Ethnobotany: plants and people
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Ethnobotany: plants and people
Plants and peoples and their interactions
Curated by Eve Emshwiller
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Coffee Plants Don't Like It Hot | EveryONE - PLOS Blogs Network

Coffee Plants Don't Like It Hot | EveryONE - PLOS Blogs Network | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
Until about ten years ago, reports of H. hampei attacks on coffee plants growing above 1500 m (the preferred altitude of cultivated and naturally occurring C. arabica) were few and far between. But thanks to the 0.2-0.5 ...

Via Nanci J.
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valenzuela_et_al_0.pdf


Via Ana G. Valenzuela Zapata
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Ana G. Valenzuela Zapata's curator insight, April 17, 2013 3:32 AM

Charreria Mexican sport, lasos-lauriats made with Agave inaequidens, ixtle agave fibers.

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Could plant diversity become free (as in speech)?

Could plant diversity become free (as in speech)? | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

I’ve been tremendously privileged to be at the Seed Savers Exchange 33rd Annual Campout and Conference in Decorah, Iowa.


Via Luigi Guarino
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Seeding the future: tapping gene banks to secure our food future

Seeding the future: tapping gene banks to secure our food future | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Seeding the future: tapping gene banks to secure our food future ABC Online There are over 1700 gene banks around the world, including seed banks that store a range of plant and crop seed samples.


Via Luigi Guarino
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Redefining agricultural yields: from tonnes to people nourished per hectare - Abstract - Environmental Research Letters - IOPscience

Worldwide demand for crops is increasing rapidly due to global population growth, increased biofuel production, and changing dietary preferences.
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

And here's the original paper associated with the previous scoop.  It could be interesting to include in class discussions comparing "traditional" and "industrialized" agriculture.

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Indigenous Peoples and the Diversity of Food

Indigenous Peoples and the Diversity of Food | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
Today is International Day of the World’s Indigenous People. This year’s theme around building alliances is a reminder that indigenous people are often left out of political decision making process...
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Nanci J. 's comment, August 11, 2013 12:08 PM
Got this from Eve Emschwiiler...thanks, Eve!
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Broken treaties must become a thing of the past. UN expert calls for reconciliation with indigenous peoples - Statements - UNSR James Anaya

Broken treaties must become a thing of the past. UN expert calls for reconciliation with indigenous peoples - Statements - UNSR James Anaya | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

“In no instance should new treaties or agreements fall below or undermine the standards set forth in the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples or established in other international sources,” he said.

 

“Broken treaties must become a thing of the past,” he stressed.


Via Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson
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Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson's curator insight, August 9, 2013 10:35 AM

Broken treaties must become a thing of the past. - #IdleNoMore! #HonorTheTreaties

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Why Is My Prof Annoyed With Me? Expectations for Classroom Presence

Why Is My Prof Annoyed With Me? Expectations for Classroom Presence | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
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Eve Emshwiller's curator insight, August 9, 2013 11:51 AM

These ought to be obvious, but they aren't.  Maybe providing a link to students early in semester would help?

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Minnesota's - Wisconsin's - Michigan's Lakes Are Too Important to Risk regarding OPEN PIT MINES

Factual documentation of the statements made in the ad is available here: http://bit.ly/UvMWwp

Via Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

Could be shown to ethnobotany class along with the guest lecture about manoomin (wild-rice) harvest at Bad River's Kakagon Slough.

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Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson's curator insight, August 5, 2013 4:02 PM

Factual documentation of the statements made in the ad is available here: http://bit.ly/UvMWwp

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Mixing methods for rich and meaningful insight

Mixing methods for rich and meaningful insight | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Via International Potato Center (CIP)
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

Will be interesting to read this.

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International Potato Center (CIP)'s curator insight, August 1, 2013 12:50 PM

Pradel, W.; Cole, D.; Prain, G. (2013) Mixing methods for rich and meaningful insight: Evaluating changes in an agricultural intervention project in the Central Andes. BetterEvaluation.

The different perceptions of participants regarding the effectiveness of a project can, at times, be hard to identify. Therefore it can become extremely difficult to effectively incorporate these differences of opinion into an evaluation so that they make sense. This article provides a detailed examination of how this was done during a project among small vegetable producers in the Andes in 2010.

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Scanning Electron and Optical Light Microscopy: two complementary approaches for the understanding and interpretation of usewear and residues on stone tools

Scanning Electron and Optical Light Microscopy: two complementary approaches for the understanding and interpretation of usewear and residues on stone tools | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Usewear analysis is now well established as a powerful means by which to identify the function of stone tools excavated from archaeological sites. However, one of the main issues for usewear analysts is still to provide quantified analyses and interpretations. Several attempts have yielded promising results but have not, as of yet, been widely applied and usewear analyses are still mainly performed using either Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) or Optical Light Microscopy (OLM). The systematic comparison of micrographs from both types of microscope presented here enables us to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each system. Furthermore, it shows beginners or experts using only one type of microscope that these techniques are complementary and should be considered as such. It also represents a significant basis for developing the implementation of quantitative methods for usewear analysis with SEM and OLM.


Via Dorian Q Fuller
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Dorian Q Fuller's curator insight, July 16, 2013 2:03 AM

Looks like some promising methodological developments in this often problematic field, which can contribute to a more integrated view on past plant use

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Contrasts in the large herbivore faunas of the southern continents in the late Pleistocene and the ecological implications for human origins - Owen-Smith - 2013 - Journal of Biogeography - Wiley On...

Contrasts in the large herbivore faunas of the southern continents in the late Pleistocene and the ecological implications for human origins - Owen-Smith - 2013 - Journal of Biogeography - Wiley On... | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

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Worthwhile Canadian Initiative: Do use Wikipedia as a reference

Worthwhile Canadian Initiative: Do use Wikipedia as a reference | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
I wish professors would stop saying to students "Do not use Wikipedia as a reference." What the professor means is "Do not read Wikipedia. Do not take ideas from Wikipedia.
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

See the interesting discussion about how to talk to students about how or whether to use and cite Wikipedia in writing assignments.

hat tip:  Marc F. Bellemare ‏@mfbellemare

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Mary Williams's curator insight, July 15, 2013 11:18 AM

The comments are definitely worth reading

AckerbauHalle's curator insight, July 15, 2013 1:34 PM

Das ist schon spannend. Wie soll Wikipedia als Quelle eingesetzt werden?

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plagiarism.pdf

Eve Emshwiller's insight:

More on avoiding plagiarism - good to show when assigning term paper.  Hat tip to @jrossibarra - thanks!

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Ending Hunger | A modern ark of seeds

Ending Hunger | A modern ark of seeds | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Remember the story of Noah gathering animals two by two to save them aboard his ark? Today, on an island near the North Pole, the Svalbard Global Seed Vault acts as a modern-day ark for seeds.


Via Luigi Guarino
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Junín: La maca en la historia andina

Junín: La maca en la historia andina | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Los incas conocieron las propiedades nutritivas de la maca, por lo que fue un alimento exclusivo para los combatientes incaicos. (RT @Cipotato: En La raíz de hoy: La #maca en la historia #andina.


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A diverse look at productivity

A diverse look at productivity | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
Take a look at the graphic up there and tell me what you see? If you’re anything like me, you’ll be a bit surprised. In this kind of “heat map” green is usually good and red is usually bad, but
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

Jeremy Cherfas discusses a paper that looks at agricultural yield in a different way.

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Ants are laying siege to the world's chocolate supply – Ed Yong – Aeon

Ants are laying siege to the world's chocolate supply – Ed Yong – Aeon | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
History tells us that plant diseases cause famines, pestilence and war. Now one is coming for our chocolate (Yikes! Cocoa trees are being threatened and it's not by traditional agriculturalists... it's by those pesky ants!
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Eve Emshwiller's curator insight, August 10, 2013 10:59 PM
In addition to the ethnobotany class, this could also be used in conjunction with including cacao as Plant of the Day in into botany as well.
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Cataloguing Potato Varieties and Traditional Knowledge from the Andean Highlands of Huancavelica, Peru

Cataloguing Potato Varieties and Traditional Knowledge from the Andean Highlands of Huancavelica, Peru | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Via International Potato Center (CIP)
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

Looks like a fascinating and valuable book! 

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International Potato Center (CIP)'s curator insight, August 7, 2013 8:51 AM

 Scurrah, M.; Haan, S. de; Winge, T. (2013). Cataloguing Potato Varieties and Traditional Knowledge from the Andean Highlands of Huancavelica, Peru.  IN: Andersen, R.; Winge, T. (eds.).  Realising Farmers' Rights to Crop Genetic Resources Success Stories and Best Practices.  Routledge, pp. 65-79.

In 2006, a potato catalogue from Peru broke new ground in the documentation of agricultural biodiversity and traditional knowledge. The Catalogo de variedades de Papa Nativa de Huancavelica - Peru (Catalogue of Native Potato Varieties from Huancavelica, Peru) was published by the International Potato Centre (CIP), and the Federation of Farmer Communities s of the Department of Huancavelica (FEDECCH). This chapter tells the story of how the catalogue was created and relates the views and experiences of the involved farmers as well as those of its other users, looking back on the process, the catalogue itself and some of the results.

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Co-occurrence of linguistic and biological diversity in biodiversity hotspots and high biodiversity wilderness areas

RT @Ethnobotanica: Open access paper on co-occurence of linguistic & biological diversity http://t.co/PqGyrKEAld


Via Luigi Guarino
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The Archaeobotanist: The eastern fertile crescent returns

The Archaeobotanist: The eastern fertile crescent returns | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

The recent paper in Science by Riehl et al. on the evidence for Chogah Golan has rightly garnerd wide attention (e.g. Science news; commentary by Willcox). This is a highly significant paper, which shows that the beginnings of cultivation were indeed mutlicentric within the fertile ccrescent, and it suggests that there was an independent domestication process for emmer wheat in the eastern fertile crescent in addition to that in the western fertile crescent.

 

Are there surprises? Yes. The big surprise here is the emmer wheat domestication, as many have argued on biogeographical and modern genetic grounds that there should have been and eastern and western barley domestication, but this has been little considered for wheat. 


Via Dorian Q Fuller
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Dorian Q Fuller's curator insight, July 15, 2013 7:33 AM

my quick digestion of, digression from, the recent Science paper by Riehl, et al.

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Helping the most vulnerable farmers adapt to climate change – lessons from a Farm Africa project

Helping the most vulnerable farmers adapt to climate change – lessons from a Farm Africa project | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
By Jonathan Finnighan Helping the most vulnerable farmers adapt to climate change – lessons from a Farm Africa project The first thing that strikes me about Mwangangi’s farm is that it looks abando...

...The impact evaluation found that two-thirds of the farmers in the project are now using new micro-catchments on their farms, and about half started cultivating drought tolerant crops that they weren’t before. Crop yields from zai pits greatly improved, especially for farmers with very arid soils: many reported that their yields tripled or more. And on average, farmers estimated that their families had an additional month of food from their harvests after using the new farming methods, and that this allowed them to spend more money on things other than food – such as buying animals and farming inputs and improving their home.


Via diana buja
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diana buja's curator insight, July 9, 2013 2:47 AM

The zai pits described in this piece are indigenous to parts of the Sudanese Sahel.  They work quite well in water-stressed areas, and I'm glad to see them being introduced in Kenya.

Farm Africa has been doing some interesting work in east Africa.  More than many other NGOs, their follow-up over the longterm is generally quite good.  And that's where many of the problems of improvements or new technologies being continued are located - lack of ongoing assessment and assistance.

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Agriculture's roots spread east to Iran | Humans | Science News

Agriculture's roots spread east to Iran | Humans | Science News | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Agriculture originated across a broader swath of southwestern Asia’s Fertile Crescent, and over a longer time period, than many scientists have thought, excavations in western Iran suggest.

Between 11,700 and 9,800 years ago, residents of Chogha Golan, a settlement in the foothills of Iran’s Zagros Mountains, went from cultivating wild ancestors of modern crops to growing a form of domesticated wheat called emmer, say archaeobotanist Simone Riehl of the University of Tübingen, Germany, and her colleagues. Until now, most evidence of farming’s origins came from sites 700 to 1,500 kilometers west of Chogha Golan, the scientists report in the July 5Science.


Via Dorian Q Fuller, diana buja
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KEW GARDENS - Beyond the Gardens: The Forgotten Home of Coffee

A story of guardianship by Kew over one of the world's most economically valuable crops, we reveal the surprisingly fragile foundations that lie beneath the multi-billion…
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

Nice introduction to problems of low diversity in crops, featuring many people's favorite stimulating beverage.

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