Ethnobotany: plants and people
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Ethnobotany: plants and people
Plants and peoples and their interactions
Curated by Eve Emshwiller
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Floating gardens can feed Bangladesh

Floating gardens can feed Bangladesh | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Bangladesh is a crowded nation where more than 150 million people live in an area smaller than the U.S. state of Washington. Poverty, malnutrition, and rural unemployment are daily challenges to food security.


Via Luigi Guarino
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These Vegetables Can Protect You From Fukushima Radiation #radiation #fukushima

These Vegetables Can Protect You From Fukushima Radiation #radiation #fukushima | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Georgetown University Medical Center researchers say a compound derived from cruciferous vegetable such as cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli protected rats and mice from lethal doses of radiation.

Their study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) suggests the compound, already shown to be safe for humans, may protect normal tissues during radiation therapy for cancer treatment and prevent or mitigate sickness caused by radiation exposure.


Via Elle D'Coda
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

The headline is a bit hyped up, compared to the evidence in the paper, don't you think?  Nonetheless, we know Brassicas are good veggies. 

Another question:  Why are those parsnips in that (otherwise) very attractive photo?  Or, aren't those parsnips?

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Elle D'Coda's curator insight, October 18, 2013 11:59 AM

Known for protecting against cancer, 3,3'-diindolymethane is now shown to protect from heavy radiation! With Fukushima continuing to release massive amounts of radiation into our environment, folks had better eat these veggies daily.

Rousseau's curator insight, October 20, 2013 8:34 AM

la catastrophe de Fukushima est connue de tous...
Cette étude peut donc révéler à beaucoup de personnes les bienfaits

 des crucifères

 

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The origins of wheat in China and potential pathways for its introduction: A review

The origins of wheat in China and potential pathways for its introduction: A review | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Today in China, hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum – common wheat or bread wheat) is one of the major staple food crops. The other key cereal staples – rice, foxtail millet and broomcorn millet – are widely accepted as Chinese domesticates, but the origins of wheat cultivation in China are the subject of debate. There has long been a belief among Chinese scholars that China was an independent centre of wheat domestication, but recent scholarship suggests that cultivated wheat was introduced to China from its original site of domestication in the Near East. The precise path of entry is unknown. It is argued here that it is most likely to have been introduced at some time around the late 6th to early 5th millennium BP. Two hypotheses are presented. One hypothesis, supported primarily by the paleobotanical evidence, postulates that T. aestivum came in from the west, through northern Xinjiang, probably from Afghanistan or the Central Asian oases rather than the Eurasian steppes. The second, supported by the available archaeological evidence, proposes that the route of entry might have been from the north-west, from Eurasia, through southern Siberia and Mongolia.


Via Dorian Q Fuller
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Dorian Q Fuller's curator insight, September 1, 2013 3:47 AM

Another attempt to make sense of the esrly wheat finds in China, in this case in terms of hypotheses for routes of introduction. There is a preference in this paper from a route from southern central Asia via Xinjiang, with the case made that the lack of early finds in Xinjiang is due to a lack of archaeobotanical sampling. An introduction from Sibera/Mongolia directly to Gansu is also entertained as a second possibility.

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Serranía de los Paraguas: Diversidad para la Resiliencia

Serranía de los Paraguas: Diversidad para la Resiliencia | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
Serranía de los Paraguas, a recognized Coffee Cultural Landscape and World Heritage Site by UNESCO, sits in a mountainous region of western Colombia. The rich biodiversity of the landscape’s natural reserves has been protected by establishing a network of leaders with a commitment to agroecological farming and community-based ecotourism, based on activities that affirm local culture and develop local markets. Its network of producers and organizations offer a range of environmentally friendly products and services. Such diversification of land uses and income sources within the landscape is helping to build resilience within the Serranía and beyond.
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A Secret Illustrated History of Coffee, Coca, and Cola

A Secret Illustrated History of Coffee, Coca, and Cola | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

"What America's premier anti-drug autocrat has to do with Bach and helping Coke import illegal coca leaves.


On the heels of the year’s best picture-books and the question of what makes a great one comes A Secret History of Coffee, Coca & Cola .."

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Using yaupon to brew a truly Texas tea

Using yaupon to brew a truly Texas tea | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
This native plant is North America's only indigenous source of caffeine.

Via Meristemi
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

Tea made of yaupon tastes similar to its relative yerba mate.

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Farmers and genebanks, an alliance to save traditional crops ...

Farmers and genebanks, an alliance to save traditional crops ... | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Farmers and genebanks, an alliance to save traditional crops from Agrobiodiversity Platform on Vimeo. Together with indigenous farmers we explored their possible alliance with genebanks to support the conservation, better ...


Via Luigi Guarino
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Tribal Trust - The treaties is not a gift, or special interests, they are a core responsibility of trust and agreement.

Tribal Trust - The treaties is not a gift, or special interests, they are a core responsibility of trust and agreement. | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

The Fish and Wildlife Service's Midwest Region recently developed this video as a tool to help our employees better understand our trust responsibilities as a federal agency for working with Indian Tribes.

A unique relationship exists between Native American Tribes and the United States Government; and, this relationship has important implications for the Service and the work that we do.

"This video is the newest tool developed to help us all better understand what our responsibilities are, how this applies to the work we do, and how we can work together to meet our shared goals," said Midwest Regional Director, Tom Melius. "Effectively working with Tribes is a priority for our Region and presents a tremendous conservation partnership opportunity".

Many individuals, including many of our Tribal partners, Service employees, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and our regional Office of the Solicitor contributed to producing the video. We hope it will be a valuable resource not only for our employees but also for our Tribal partners and others who are interested in learning more about the Federal trust responsibility to Indian Tribes.

More information on our work with Tribes is available on our Partnerships with Native Americans website at: http://www.fws.gov/midwest/Tribal


Via Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson, JRey Crow, Fawn Youngbear-Tibbetts
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Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson's curator insight, April 7, 2013 9:59 AM

The treaties is not a gift, privilege or special interests, they are a core responsibility of trust, promise and agreement; its a duty and obligation.

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The Botany of Booze - Discover Magazine

The Botany of Booze - Discover Magazine | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
Sake began with a grain of rice. Scotch emerged from barley, tequila from agave, rum from sugarcane, bourbon from corn. The new book The Drunken Botanist explores the dizzying array of herbs, flowers, trees, fruits and fungi that humans ...

Via Nanci J. Ross
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plagiarism.pdf

Eve Emshwiller's insight:

More on avoiding plagiarism - good to show when assigning term paper.  Hat tip to @jrossibarra - thanks!

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Ending Hunger | A modern ark of seeds

Ending Hunger | A modern ark of seeds | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Remember the story of Noah gathering animals two by two to save them aboard his ark? Today, on an island near the North Pole, the Svalbard Global Seed Vault acts as a modern-day ark for seeds.


Via Luigi Guarino
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Junín: La maca en la historia andina

Junín: La maca en la historia andina | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Los incas conocieron las propiedades nutritivas de la maca, por lo que fue un alimento exclusivo para los combatientes incaicos. (RT @Cipotato: En La raíz de hoy: La #maca en la historia #andina.


Via Luigi Guarino
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Wis. Mining legislation foes say bill to eliminate local control over #WIMINE - #LRB 3146 #LRB3408

Wis. Mining legislation foes say bill to eliminate local control over #WIMINE - #LRB 3146 #LRB3408 | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
Area officials express outrage at “power grab” but proposal’s supporter says law would add clarity

Via Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

Very relevant to topic on harvest of Manoomin at Bad River Nation in Ethnobotany course.

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Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson's curator insight, October 19, 2013 1:29 PM

#WIMINE - #LRB 3146 #LRB3408 - #IdleNoMore #NOMINE -- Russo and Jauch both fear that the provisions of the frac sand bill will also be sued to invalidate Ashland and Iron Counties efforts to provide local regulation of proposed taconite mining on the Penokee Range east of Mellen. According to an analysis by the Wisconsin Legislative Reference Bureau: “This bill generally prohibits a county, city, village, town, county utility district, town sanitary district, public inland lake protection and rehabilitation district, or metropolitan sewage district (local governmental unit) from establishing or enforcing a standard of water quality; issuing permits related to water quality or quantity; imposing restrictions related to water quality or quantity; or requiring monitoring of water quality or quantity.” - - According to the LRB It also abrogates such authority related to air quality. Current law authorizes a county to administer an air pollution control program with requirements that are consistent with or stricter than those in state laws related to air quality if DNR approves the program. This bill eliminates that authority, the LRB analysis said.

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How Science Figured Out the Age of the Earth: Scientific American

How Science Figured Out the Age of the Earth: Scientific American | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
For centuries scholars sought to determine the earth’s age, but the answer had to wait for careful geologic observation, isotopic analyses of the elements and an understanding of radioactive decay
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

Useful for lectures on the origin of Life on Earth.

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Eve Emshwiller's curator insight, October 20, 2013 5:17 PM
I meant to scoop it onto this page in the first place (Botany Teaching & cetera) not the ethnobotany one.
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The Southern Foodways Alliance's Oral History Initiative Features Women at Work - LA Weekly (blog)

The Southern Foodways Alliance's Oral History Initiative Features Women at Work - LA Weekly (blog) | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
LA Weekly (blog) The Southern Foodways Alliance's Oral History Initiative Features Women at Work LA Weekly (blog) If you've spent any time planning a trip through the South, your research may have already led you to the Southern Foodways Alliance's...
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Biodiversity and Andean grains: balancing market potential and sustainable livelihoods

Biodiversity and Andean grains: balancing market potential and sustainable livelihoods | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Via Bioversity Library
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What Ales You: 'Botany of Beer' explores how it grows on us - Press Herald

What Ales You: 'Botany of Beer' explores how it grows on us - Press Herald | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
Press Herald
What Ales You: 'Botany of Beer' explores how it grows on us
Press Herald
Hops has the botanical name "humulus," Boland said, and is in the hemp or cannabaceae family, making it a close relative of marijuana.
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Archaeologists Uncover First Use of Spices in European Cuisine | Science/AAAS | News

Archaeologists Uncover First Use of Spices in European Cuisine | Science/AAAS | News | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Bits of silica stuck in charred residues scraped from pots reveal that chefs in northern Europe were cooking with spices at least 6 millennia ago. Although researchers have previously noted the use of strong-flavored ingredients such as onions by cooks in this region during the same era, the new find is the first to report the use of an ingredient that didn’t also have nutritional value—which means that the spice, ground seeds from a plant called garlic mustard, was almost certainly used solely for its flavor.


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About Afroculinaria

About Afroculinaria | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

"Afroculinaria is a food blog authored by Michael W. Twitty, (Twitter: @Koshersoul), a food writer, independent scholar, culinary historian , and historical interpreter personally charged with preparing, preserving and promoting African American foodways and its parent traditions in Africa and her Diaspora and its legacy in the food culture of the American South.  Michael is a Judaic studies teacher from the Washington D.C. Metropolitan area and his interests include food culture, food history, Jewish cultural issues, African American history and cultu ral politics. Afroculinaria will highlight and address food’s critical role in the development and definition of African American civilization and the politics of consumption and cultural ownership that surround it."

Eve Emshwiller's insight:

Foodways of the African diaspora.  Excellent example in topic of Global Movement of Plants and People.  Keep on following this blog.

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White Wolf: Looking back to see ahead: One woman’s quest to bring back Native American food traditions

White Wolf: Looking back to see ahead: One woman’s quest to bring back Native American food traditions | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
The survival of wolf populations by teaching about wolves, their relationship to wildlands.Find beautiful Videos creations, photographie,wolf wisdom,quotes,wolf poetry,native american legends.

Via Fawn Youngbear-Tibbetts
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Coffee Plants Don't Like It Hot | EveryONE - PLOS Blogs Network

Coffee Plants Don't Like It Hot | EveryONE - PLOS Blogs Network | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
Until about ten years ago, reports of H. hampei attacks on coffee plants growing above 1500 m (the preferred altitude of cultivated and naturally occurring C. arabica) were few and far between. But thanks to the 0.2-0.5 ...

Via Nanci J. Ross
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valenzuela_et_al_0.pdf


Via Ana G. Valenzuela Zapata
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Ana G. Valenzuela Zapata's curator insight, April 17, 2013 3:32 AM

Charreria Mexican sport, lasos-lauriats made with Agave inaequidens, ixtle agave fibers.

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Could plant diversity become free (as in speech)?

Could plant diversity become free (as in speech)? | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

I’ve been tremendously privileged to be at the Seed Savers Exchange 33rd Annual Campout and Conference in Decorah, Iowa.


Via Luigi Guarino
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Seeding the future: tapping gene banks to secure our food future

Seeding the future: tapping gene banks to secure our food future | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Seeding the future: tapping gene banks to secure our food future ABC Online There are over 1700 gene banks around the world, including seed banks that store a range of plant and crop seed samples.


Via Luigi Guarino
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