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Fresh from the Ground - Part 1

Traditional Plant Knowledge in the Cyber Age...

 

Video (<7 minutes) includes issues of IPR of Hoodia succulent and other aspects of ethnobotany among the San people of southern Africa.

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Ethnobotany: plants and people
Plants and peoples and their interactions
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The Secret History of Cannabis in Japan | Global Research - Centre for Research on Globalization

The Secret History of Cannabis in Japan | Global Research - Centre for Research on Globalization | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

According to Takayasu, the earliest traces of cannabis in Japan are seeds and woven fibers discovered in the west of the country dating back to the Jomon Period (10,000 BC – 300 BC). Archaeologists suggest that cannabis fibers were used for clothes – as well as for bow strings and fishing lines. These plants were likely cannabis sativa – prized for its strong fibers – a thesis supported by a Japanese prehistoric cave painting which appears to show a tall spindly plant with cannabis’s tell-tale leaves.

“Cannabis was the most important substance for prehistoric people in Japan. But today many Japanese people have a very negative image of the plant,” says Takayasu


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Dorian Q Fuller's curator insight, October 12, 2015 10:42 AM

Indeed, currently the earliest archaeobotanical evidence for Cannabis comes from Early Jomon Japan, at sites such as Torihama (ca. 5000 BC) and Okinoshima (ca. 8000 BC).

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Contesting the presence of wheat in the British Isles 8,000 years ago by assessing ancient DNA authenticity from low-coverage data

Contesting the presence of wheat in the British Isles 8,000 years ago by assessing ancient DNA authenticity from low-coverage data | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
Contamination with exogenous DNA is a constant hazard to ancient DNA studies, since their validity greatly depend on the ancient origin of the retrieved sequences. Since contamination occurs sporadically, it is fundamental to show positive evidence for ...

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Dorian Q Fuller's curator insight, November 9, 2015 8:42 PM

This study models the expected decay patterns in 8000 year old wheat DNA and compares it that that reported from off the British coast earlier this year (http://archaeobotanist.blogspot.co.uk/2015/02/mesolithic-cereal-trade-in-europe.html). Turns out the sedimentary aDNA doesn't look to Mesolithic after all. Oops.

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Climate change threatens staple potato crop in high Andes - RTCC

RTCC Climate change threatens staple potato crop in high Andes RTCC The creation of the Potato Park dates back from 1997 when an NGO called Andes Association promoted the conservation of the indigenous heritage regarding local rights, livelihoods...

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Las sesgadas teorías del hombre cazador y la mujer recolectora

Las sesgadas teorías del hombre cazador y la mujer recolectora | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Ideas y supuestos preconcebidos sobre cómo son o deberían ser las cosas dirigen nuestra mirada y la interpretación de los datos, observaciones, experimentos… y, en definitiva, lo que aceptamos como conocimiento verdadero


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Summary of the Internationl Rice Congress, with photos and videos

Summary of the Internationl Rice Congress, with photos and videos | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
In the blink of an eye, IRC2014 has come and gone. A week ago we were saying farewell to friends old and new, and getting set to leave Bangkok and return home. Was IRC2014 a success? The feedback w...

Via Mary Williams
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Mary Williams's curator insight, November 9, 2014 5:25 AM

I love this photo - the goldfish are a brilliant touch

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Brewery recreates 3,500-year-old Scandinavian alcohol

Brewery recreates 3,500-year-old Scandinavian alcohol | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
New research has found that ancient Scandinavians drank alcohol made from a combination of barley, honey, cranberries, herbs and grape wine.
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

These studies on reconstructed beer recipes are always popular.

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Searching for the Amazon's Hidden Civilizations

Searching for the Amazon's Hidden Civilizations | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
Statistical model predicts signs of agriculture in the rainforest
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Hat tip: Mario Rosina Barragán

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An Approach for Teaching Diversity

"A Dozen Suggestions for Enhancing Student Learning by Jim Winship

 

The key word in this title is "An"—this is "an approach" not "the approach" to teaching about diversity. The dozen suggestions here were derived from an extensive literature review, conversations with a number of people nationwide who are knowledgeable about the subject, the contributions of a dozen UWW faculty during a LEARN Center discussion group on "Teaching about Diversity, Teaching in Multicultural Contexts" in the Spring of 2003, and my own twenty-five-plus years of college teaching, twenty-two of these at UW-Whitewater. At UW-Whitewater, I teach a diversity course that draws students from all four colleges at the university and I also integrate diversity-related content and skill development in the social work courses I teach.

The following list of twelve suggestions is not exhaustive. They are ones that are supported by published literature on teaching for diversity, on effective college teaching, and are ones that both colleagues here at UW-Whitewater and I have found effective in teaching our undergraduate students. Faculty are encouraged to adopt those that fit with their discipline and teaching style, and adapt the exercises, simulations, and other materials on this website to their specific courses. The twelve suggestions are roughly sequential—starting with course planning and the start of a class, followed by ideas and approaches that can be used throughout a semester, ending with the importance of providing and receiving feedback."

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How Nikolay Vavilov, the seed collector who tried to end famine, died of starvation

How Nikolay Vavilov, the seed collector who tried to end famine, died of starvation | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
Nikolay Vavilov collected more seeds, tubers and fruits than any person in history. Gary Paul Nabhan chronicled Vavilov's quest in Where Our Food Comes From.
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The Twelve Days of Christmas Plants: Peppermint

The Twelve Days of Christmas Plants: Peppermint | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

This series of posts will highlight the plants that help you celebrate the Yuletide season. From candy canes to lattes, peppermint just tastes like winter. Here’s more on the flora behind the flavor.ob

Peppermint is a sterile hybrid (Mentha × piperita) of watermint (Mentha aquatic) and spearmint (Mentha spicata). Even though it doesn’t produce seeds, it is a prolific propagator via vegetative growth of stolons (plant biology word of the day). In the case of mint, stolons are runners of the root system just below the soil surface that can establish their own root system and plant. Because mint is very good at this, it can be quite invasive once it gets established.

Eve Emshwiller's insight:

Useful link for the module with mentha and yerba buena in Ethnobotany course (comparing medicinal plant use between immigrants and their source countries).

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Christian Allié's curator insight, January 3, 2014 5:25 AM

......."""........

 

[ .... ]

 

..... but there is a physiological reason that peppermint is the flavor of winter. It turns out that the cooling sensation of mint (think breath mints or menthol chest rubs) is not just a marketing gimmick. The main peppermint flavor ingredient, menthol, activates TRPM8 (aka Transient Receptor Potential cation channel subfamily M member 8), which is involved in neuronal signaling of cooling sensations. The action of TRPM8 (a channel that allows for the flux of cations like calcium) is part of the biochemical basis for how mammals sense temperature, innocuous cooling specifically. Because menthol triggers TRPM8 into action at warmer temperatures than it normally would, it makes us feel like we are cooler than we actually are.

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TEDxFIU: Breeding climate resistant crops

TEDxFIU: Breeding climate resistant crops | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
 
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Eric von Wettberg on importance of crop wild relatives for breeding crops resistant to climate change. Video is less than 10 minutes  

Hat tip: Allison Miller @ajmiller4233

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The irrational nature of pie

The irrational nature of pie | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
What is a nut, and why is the answer so convoluted? For Thanksgiving, Katherine explores pecans and the very best vegetarian turkey substitute ever: pecan pie.Traditions Thanksgiving is all about t...
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

"Fruit types should be fun, and yet people definitely have entrenched ideas about the right way to classify the fruit of a given species. We botanists seem to get particularly worked up over the definition of a nut ."
 
This engaging post will be fun to share with students when teaching about plant fruit classification. 

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Eve Emshwiller's curator insight, December 28, 2013 12:04 AM
Great fun for teaching crazy fruit classifications.
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Chemistry: A festive ferment : Nature : Nature Publishing Group

Chemistry: A festive ferment : Nature : Nature Publishing Group | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

"Harold McGee surveys a seething array of microbially transformed treats [mdash] from beard beer and grasshopper sauce to extreme herring and armpit cheese.

Rare is the holiday meal that does not owe many of its pleasures to invisible cooks with tongue-twisting names. Do you enjoy charcuterie and pickles? Bread with cultured butter? A drizzle of vinaigrette on this or that? A bit of cheese? Some chocolates? Wine, beer or cider? Then raise a glass to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Leuconostoc mesenteroides and their ilk, the fungi and bacteria that do the real work of turning blandness into piquant delight."

Eve Emshwiller's insight:

Keep for fermentation topic in ethnobotany class.  Hat tip: @emmathegardener (Emma Cooper)

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Ancient Oats Discovery Shows Cavemen Loved Carbs | The Plate

Ancient Oats Discovery Shows Cavemen Loved Carbs | The Plate | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
Maybe the Paleo Diet should include a nice warm bowl of oatmeal. Strict followers of the fashionable “caveman” regimen shun starchy foods, sticking to breakfasts such as cold halibut with fruit and…

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Answering an Appeal by Mao Led Tu Youyou, a Chinese Scientist, to a Nobel Prize - The New York Times

Answering an Appeal by Mao Led Tu Youyou, a Chinese Scientist, to a Nobel Prize - The New York Times | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
Dr. Tu was awarded the prize, shared with two other scientists, on Monday for the discovery of a drug that is now part of standard regimens to fight malaria.

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Forests that are sacred to local people are less likely to suffer deforestation, study suggests

Forests that are sacred to local people are less likely to suffer deforestation, study suggests | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Photo Credit: Ippei & Janine Naoi "As sacred forests are found in many cultures around the world, there is some hope that, in addition to their cultural significance, the persistence of these values can make an important contribution to conservation of biodiversity."

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Un nuevo análisis descarta que los perros fueran domesticados en el Paleolítico

Un nuevo análisis descarta que los perros fueran domesticados en el Paleolítico | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

La hipótesis de que los perros acompañaran al hombre mucho antes de la revolución neolítica recibe un duro golpe esta semana con la publicación de un trabajo en Scientific Reports que pone en duda los análisis anatómicos en los que se basaba. 


Via CRCiencia
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

Okay, not plants, but domestication.

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Kew’s 'codebreaker’ mourns his lily – Telegraph Blogs

Kew’s 'codebreaker’ mourns his lily – Telegraph Blogs | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
Carlos Magdalena 'has done things no one else can do’ but a thief has put at risk his work to save a tiny, rare plant. Tom Chivers reports In a little warm puddle in rural Rwanda, a tiny flower used to grow; a water lily, barely half an inch across.
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

Conservation, ethics, extinction, etc.

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To UW-Madison professor, there's nothing ordinary about vanilla

To UW-Madison professor, there's nothing ordinary about vanilla | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

A UW-Madison expert on vanilla orchids crosses the world to ensure that the spice it produces remains a valuable agricultural product.

Madison— To Ken Cameron, vanilla is a lot sexier than its name implies.

The world's leading expert on the biology of vanilla orchids sees the popular spice, not as plain or ordinary, but as a beautifully complex and valuable commodity produced from the world's largest family of plants.

While bottles of vanilla extract fly off store shelves at this time of year as holiday bakers mix it into cakes, pies and cookies, vanilla is much more than a pastry chef's favorite spice.

Deodorants, household cleaners, popular brands of vodka, pill coatings, the finest perfumes, even Coke and Pepsi count vanilla as an ingredient. And, of course, it's the No. 1 selling ice cream.

"I often tell people, 'I'll challenge you that within 10 minutes of waking, you will encounter vanilla,'" Cameron said in his book- and plant-filled office at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he's a botany professor and director of the Wisconsin State Herbarium."


Read more from Journal Sentinel: http://www.jsonline.com/newswatch/to-uw-madison-professor-theres-nothing-ordinary-about-vanilla-b99156145z1-236666281.html#ixzz2q3Z6nlzh
Follow us: @JournalSentinel on Twitter
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

A feature on my colleague Ken Cameron's research on vanilla orchids.

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What drives changes in food security and what does this imply for agricultural and food policy? | ReSAKSS - Asia

What drives changes in food security and what does this imply for agricultural and food policy? | ReSAKSS - Asia | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Food security is a particular concern for Asia. The first reason is the sheer size of Asia’s undernourishment problem. According to a recent FAO report, of the 868 million people estimated to be undernourished in the world, 564 million, or 65 percent of the total, reside in countries of Asia (FAO 2012). Undernourished people constitute 14 percent of the population of Asia. The problem is particularly alarming with regard to children. Among several Asian countries the incidence of childhood stunting exceeds 40 percent.


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Traditional knowledge, culture can be patented - Times of India

Traditional knowledge, culture can be patented Times of India MUMBAI: Traditional Knowledge (TK) and Traditional Cultural Expression (TCE) reflecting a community's cultural and social identity, handed down generations, may soon be recognized as a...
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

Useful for topic on Intellectual Property, Traditional Knowledge, Biopiracy, and research ethics in ethnobotany course.

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Michael Twitty on Culinary Injustice at MAD3 - YouTube

Learn more about culinary historian Michael Twitty's presentation at MAD3 on the MADfeed: http://tmblr.co/Z462xt-Vv4Rw
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

I will definitely show to ethnobotany class.  "Yum, yum, yummy."

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Community Biodiversity Management book is freely avaialable on line

Community Biodiversity Management book is freely avaialable on line | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research. Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research. Home · About us ... Bookmark and Share. Filed under: Publications. Tags: agrobiodiversity, Farmer, knowledge, natural resources management ...


Via Luigi Guarino
Eve Emshwiller's insight:

Download it!

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The History Blog » Blog Archive » 1000-year-old vineyards found in Basque Country

The History Blog » Blog Archive » 1000-year-old vineyards found in Basque Country | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it

"Archaeologists from the University of the Basque Country have unearthed the tell-tale signs of viticulture dating to the 10th century at the archaeological site of Zaballa, in the Álava province of Basque Country, northern Spain. Zaballa is one of 300 rural settlements in the Álava region that were deserted hundreds of years ago. It’s the one that has been most thoroughly excavated and published."

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The Archaeology of Beer

The Archaeology of Beer | Ethnobotany: plants and people | Scoop.it
Dogfish Head’s ancient, hybrid brews embody a past before ale and wine became separate categories.
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