Ethnobotany in th...
Follow
Find
607 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from Ethnobotany: plants and people
onto Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic
Scoop.it!

Mushrooms in the Chicago Region

Mushrooms in the Chicago Region | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it
Patrick Leacock, a mycologist at the Field Museum of Natural History, discusses the types of macro-fungi found in the Chicago area.

 

Audio only, so you don't see his slides, but still a nice talk on edible and non-edible fungi by my friend and fomer colleague Patrick Leacock. (~1 hour)


Via Eve Emshwiller
more...
No comment yet.
Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic
Plants and People in this Bioregion
Curated by Marybeth Shea
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from Agricultural Biodiversity
Scoop.it!

Beertone: A Beer Color Reference Guide

Beertone: A Beer Color Reference Guide | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it

We all know Pantone and now it's time to get educated on beer, or the color of beer, with Beertone. Beertone aims to be a beer color reference guide. (RT @simransethi: Cheers!


Via Luigi Guarino
Marybeth Shea's insight:

Very fun for craft beer drinkers and makers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

UM-Dearborn College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters

UM-Dearborn College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it
Marybeth Shea's insight:

Dan Moerman's searchable index of American tribal ethnobotany.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Romanian Love Charms: Inventory Summary

Romanian Love Charms: Inventory Summary | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it
Marybeth Shea's insight:

Plant-focused portion of this interdisciplinary project.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

The ease and appeal of DIY slivovitz

The ease and appeal of DIY slivovitz | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it
Not long ago, I gave a dinner party typical of the Washington scene, with guests who had spent considerable time in other places. Foreign service officers, journalists, academics who had enjoyed...
Marybeth Shea's insight:

Making plum brandy, in your kitchen.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science
Scoop.it!

iloveACORNS

iloveACORNS | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it
Information about preparing and eating acorns. Describes various products made from acorn oil and flour on Kea island in Greece.

Via Meristemi
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science
Scoop.it!

Hollies Get Prickly for a Reason

Hollies Get Prickly for a Reason | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it
When animals browse, holly trees make more spiny leaves, an example of epigenetic adaption to environmental pressure.

Via Meristemi
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science
Scoop.it!

Wild ginseng in steep decline in Maryland, survey reveals: Q&A with Smithsonian botanist Christopher Puttock  | Smithsonian Science

Wild ginseng in steep decline in Maryland, survey reveals: Q&A with Smithsonian botanist Christopher Puttock  | Smithsonian Science | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it

Our goal is to return wild ginseng to its historic densities in native forests in Maryland and develop a sustainable wild harvest. Forests in Maryland now hold less than 1 percent of their original density of wild ginseng and the plant is in danger of extirpation.


Via Meristemi
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

My Garden

My Garden | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it
The RHS’s online community for gardeners
Marybeth Shea's insight:

Ninebark, Physocarpus opulifolius, from US mid-Atlantic forests. The inner bark has laxitive and emetic effects.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from Agricultural Biodiversity
Scoop.it!

The ‘roots’ of Ginger

The ‘roots’ of Ginger | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it
This healthy edition of Students of Ethnobotany comes from the spicy Melissa Tong. Zingiber officinale, commonly known as ginger, is believed to originate from the tropics of Southeast Asia, around...

Via Luigi Guarino
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Richters SeedZoo Rare Seeds

Richters SeedZoo Rare Seeds | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it
SeedZoo Video: 
Introducing Plant Explorer 
Joseph Simcox

In this video plant explorer Joseph Simcox talks about food biodiversity and how, through the SeedZoo project, gardeners can grow some of the world’s threatened food plants in their gardens. By growing these plants, and sharing seeds with friends and family, Simcox believes gardeners can have a real impact on saving our food plant diversity.

Marybeth Shea's insight:

Fabulous idea. Let your small plot be a move toward biodiversity conservation.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from Agricultural Biodiversity
Scoop.it!

Gingerbread peyote cookies

Gingerbread peyote cookies | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it
This blog is intended as a forum for sharing my cacti growing ordeals. The focus is primarily on small Mexican species, e.g. Lophophora (peyote), Obregonia (artichoke cactus), Acharagma, Ariocarpus (living rock) and Strombocactus.

Via Luigi Guarino
more...
Reece Bobby's curator insight, April 8, 2013 12:44 PM

Its hard to lay off the peyote with stuff like this out there. See you when you're grown up Ricky.

lane suchy's comment, April 8, 2013 4:28 PM
oh man you got to lay off the peyote
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Students of Ethnobotany: Dyeing with Oregon Grape

Students of Ethnobotany: Dyeing with Oregon Grape | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it
This colorful edition of Students of Ethnobotany comes from the creative Emma J. Mahonia aquifolium is commonly known as Oregon Grape (though it really isn’t a grape at all!), or sometimes as...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from AnnBot
Scoop.it!

Salvia Chewing Gum: a Formula For Enhancing Psycho-spirituality

Salvia Chewing Gum: a Formula For Enhancing Psycho-spirituality | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it

Salvia, as its name suggests (Latin salvere, to feel well and healthy) has for millenia been used as a herb. Now the use in chewing gum as been patented!

 

"The present invention relates to a chewing gum formulation that serves as a means for awakening human consciousness and mindfulness to the sensorial subtleties, which in turn strengthens sovereignty such that overall psycho-spirituality is enhanced. ..."


Via Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research
Marybeth Shea's insight:

Deeper into the patent application, the need for spiritual enlightenment is given.  Cannot imagine that patent examiners often read such paragraphs on the job. :)

more...
Marybeth Shea's curator insight, December 12, 2012 8:14 AM

Salvia, now in a gum and not likely gum Arabic.....

Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Maryland breweries team up for craft beer showcase - Baltimore Sun

Maryland breweries team up for craft beer showcase - Baltimore Sun | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it
Maryland breweries team up for craft beer showcase
Baltimore Sun
Padonia Station in Timonium is taking that last element to the next level, hosting the first Super Bowl of Maryland Craft Beer from Thursday, Jan.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from Botany Whimsy
Scoop.it!

Rural Intelligence | Style: Garden - Margaret Roach Delivers The Backyard Parables

Rural Intelligence | Style: Garden - Margaret Roach Delivers The Backyard Parables | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it
Margaret Roach's latest book, The Backyard Parables: Lessons on Gardening, and Life, has just been published. Bess Hochstein interviews the author, gardener, and former editorial direct of Martha Stewart Living.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Romanian Charms: About

Romanian Charms: About | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it
Marybeth Shea's insight:

Fascinting interdisciplinary project with many plant listings on this site.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

SCUPPERNONG OR MUSCADINE? You decide.©

SCUPPERNONG OR MUSCADINE?  You decide.© | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it
It seems difficult to locate a pure variety of the actual native North American grape today, due in part to …Continue reading »
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Human Flower Project :: About

Human Flower Project :: About | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it
The Human Flower Project, directed by author and sociologist Julie Ardery, is a weblog of international flower news and floral customs.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

A Natural History of Mistletoe | Culturing Science, Scientific American Blog Network

A Natural History of Mistletoe | Culturing Science, Scientific American Blog Network | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it
Mistletoe is frequently spotted hanging above lovers' heads in terrible holiday specials--but only during one month of the year. That makes it easy to forget that ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from Botany Whimsy
Scoop.it!

The Botanist Islay Dry Gin

The Botanist Islay Dry Gin | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it
Botanicals are the very essence of gin, its reason for being. For this,
Marybeth Shea's insight:

Gin is so botany-based that without plants, we have no gin....no alcohol for that matter.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from Agricultural Biodiversity
Scoop.it!

The history of the tomato

One reason to love the internets, back into which, fully refreshed, we plunge, is this comment: [T]he plant Galen mentions is the λυκοπέρσιον, lykopersion, not lykopersikon. The name means ravager or slayer of wolves, like our wolfsbane.


Via Luigi Guarino
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from Africa and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine | Abstract | Wild vegetable mixes sold in the markets of Dalmatia (southern Croatia)

Dalmatia is an interesting place to study the use of wild greens as it lies at the intersection of influence of Slavs, who do not usually use many species of wild greens, and Mediterranean culinary culture, where the use of multiple wild greens is...

Via diana buja
more...
diana buja's curator insight, January 5, 2013 6:15 AM

The rich tradition of eating many wild greens may result both from strong Venetian and Greek influences and the necessity of using all food resources available in the barren, infertile land in the past. Although the number of wild-collected green vegetables is impressive we hypothesize that it may have decreased over the years, and that further in-depth local ethnobotanical studies are needed in Dalmatia to record the disappearing knowledge of edible plants.

Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Sweet Science: Making Marshmallows: Scientific American

Sweet Science: Making Marshmallows: Scientific American | Ethnobotany in the US Mid Atlantic | Scoop.it

A cooking chemistry challenge from Science Buddies...

 

They're also an ancient creation, originally coming from a tall marshmallow plant (Althaea officinalis) that grows in swampy fields and has a soft, spongy root. Its root contains mucilage

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from Agricultural Biodiversity
Scoop.it!

The Drunken Botanist

A book trailer for Amy Stewart's new book, THE DRUNKEN BOTANIST: The Plants That Create the World's Great Drinks. Coming March 2013 from Algonquin Books.

Via Eve Emshwiller, Luigi Guarino
more...
Eve Emshwiller's curator insight, December 22, 2012 1:00 PM

Funny video, less than 3 minutes.  Now, do I use it in teaching ethnobotany, or intro botany, or both?

Marybeth Shea's comment, January 1, 2013 9:14 PM
Both!
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

USFS Celebrating Wildflowers Ethnobotany Poster by Artist Steve Buchanan.pdf

RT @shimmanni: Celebrating Wildflowerswhere are all these going? http://t.co/0nTmMYKd
more...
No comment yet.