Subsidies: Thomas, E.
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Deadspin: 'Good News, Miami! There's More Stadium Work For You To Publicly Finance.'

Deadspin: 'Good News, Miami! There's More Stadium Work For You To Publicly Finance.' | Subsidies: Thomas, E. | Scoop.it

Miami has another outdated stadium that needs hundreds of millions of dollars worth of renovations. A politician instrumental in getting the Marlins taxpayer funding says the renovations are necessary. The Dolphins don't have the cash or the desire to pay for it. Guess who's left? Miami-Dade County residents, whose descendants will still be paying off the bonds for Marlins Park through 2049. Isn't sports fun?

 

Sun Life Stadium began life in 1987 as Joe Robbie Stadium, until Wayne Huizenga bought the Dolphins and sold the naming rights after Robbie died. It's not a wonderful place to watch football, being designed with soccer in mind. It's too big. The seats are far away from the field. It rains all the time. The sprinklers go off in the middle of games. But it's a perfectly functional NFL venue. What could possibly spur a cash-strapped city into deciding it needs major work?

 

Blame Roger Goodell. A few years back, the commissioner said Sun Life would need significant renovations if it wanted to continue to host Super Bowls and other major events. This, despite hosting a Super Bowl in 2010, and being one of the three stadiums shortlisted for the 2016 an 2017 games. This, despite hosting the BCS Title Game in six weeks. This, despite the stadium receiving $300 million worth of renovations over the last decade already. But Goodell's threat (and it was a threat) is working, and there's momentum building for the stadium to receive a makeover.

 

The Dolphins won't be picking up the tab. As of last year, they were still $230 million in debt from previous renovations, and sought to cover the costs of new work by pushing the county to raise hotel taxes. That was shot down, as Marlins Park backlash was in full swing. But people have short memories, and Miami-Dade County commissioner Jose "Pepe" Diaz yesterday acknowledged that the stadium's renovations are not a question of "if," but of "when" and "how."...

 

(click pic to continue reading)


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John Zuniga's curator insight, July 14, 2013 2:44 PM

What does the NFL do with the earned income? Why can't the NFL take the bill to let fans appreciate the game and players and coaches play the game?

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#FF Richard #Sherman: Make #billionaires pay for their own stadiums #YES

#FF Richard #Sherman: Make #billionaires pay for their own stadiums #YES | Subsidies: Thomas, E. | Scoop.it
A major part of the NFL’s business model is getting taxpayers to spend hundreds of millions of dollars on new stadiums. One of the NFL’s best players thinks it’s time for that practice to stop.
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Rescooped by ERICA SOLIS THOMAS from Sports Subsidies
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Pay to play: Why we gladly give franchises our money for new sporting venues ... - SB Nation

Pay to play: Why we gladly give franchises our money for new sporting venues ... - SB Nation | Subsidies: Thomas, E. | Scoop.it
Pay to play: Why we gladly give franchises our money for new sporting venues ...
SB Nation
Public funding of sports arenas and stadiums brings out venom typically reserved for the most heated on-court rivalries.

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Jason Cain's curator insight, March 22, 2014 10:29 PM

The article talks about the salary of players and elected officials that support the players. Also it mentions that big cities do benefit from having big time teams in their area. Politics are also mentioned in this article. When it comes to subsidies you will always see a politician in the background.

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Evaluating Subsidies for Professional Sports in the United States and Europe: A Public-Sector Primer


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Stop Raiding Taxpayers to Pay for Stadiums That Leave Fans High and Dry



Recently, Oakland Raiders owner Mark Davis was in Nevada to pitch a state panel on a $1.4 billion stadium deal.

Using the rosiest of rose-colored glasses, Davis and others have essentially portrayed the new stadium as a "gift for taxpayers" and an "economic boon" for Las Vegas.

In reality: "It picks their pockets." Here's why: The public is being asked to kick in $750 million of the $1.4 billion price tag; paid in $50 million annual increments over 30 years.

Taxpayers Commitment: $50 Million Annually Over 30 Years!

John Diaz, editorial page editor for the San Francisco Chronicle, said this enormous level of public funding would never happen in the Bay Area:

I think Nevada taxpayers might want to think about that when they're going to commit $50 million a year for 30 years. ... How long will it be before that venue will be considered obsolete? I would just give this cautionary note to the people of Las Vegas and Nevada who are hearing Mark Davis talk about making a lifetime commitment to Las Vegas: Don't be swept away by this. ... A lifetime commitment from the Davis family is kind of like a marriage to Liz Taylor or Larry King.


Case in point, beleaguered Missouri citizens who lost their football team earlier this year will still be paying $12 million a year until 2022 on the stadium in St. Louis!

It May Just Be a Power Play to Squeeze Oakland

The Raiders have tried and failed for years to see a new stadium built in Oakland, a city with formidable financial woes and no extra cash for such extravagances. Oh and by the way, Oakland and Alameda County are still $100 million in debt over the reconstruction of the east end of the Coliseum in 1996!

Still, some see the Las Vegas stadium bid by Davis as little more than a leverage play to win concessions from city officials in Oakland. After all, as skeptics point out, the "NFL is simply too averse to gambling" to allow a team to move to Vegas.

What they fail to consider though is the league certainly is not averse to accepting hundreds of millions of dollars of taxpayer money for its stadiums!

Subsidized Stadiums Provide Little Return on Investment to Communities

Economists have long argued that subsidized stadiums provide little, if any, return on investment to the communities relative to construction costs alone. Contrary to arguments from the NFL and its owners.

Citing the work of Judith Grant Long, a Harvard University professor of urban planning, Gregg Easterbrook, author of The King of Sports: Football's Impact on America, has noted that, "70 percent of the capital cost of NFL stadiums have been provided by taxpayers, not NFL owners. Many cities, counties, and states also pay the stadiums' ongoing costs, by providing power, sewer services, other infrastructure, and stadium improvements."

"When a stadium is publicly financed," as reported in Forbes, "it might be assumed that local governments are simply making an investment in a revenue-generating structure. However, most publicly financed projects allow teams to keep virtually all ticket, concession, and parking revenue. The public is building stadiums for wealthy team owners, and then essentially passing all the benefits of the new facility to the team."

Do Fans Benefit from Public Stadium Funds? Not really.

When was the last time you heard about owners bringing down the price of tickets, or for that matter the cost of parking, hot dogs, or beer decreasing as a result of taxpayer money building a stadium? How about better access to televised games as a result of public money?

Public funding does little to help the typical fan to enjoy a game. And if any public funds are spent, fans should demand fair prices, wide distribution of televised games, and maybe even something for the local community, like free use of the facility for all PeeWee and Little League games.

The NFL and its Billionaire Owners Don't Need Public Funding

If there is one thing that is clear from all this it is this, the most profitable sports league on the planet and its billionaire owners do not need any more taxpayer assistance!

As fans, we love the game of football, and we love our favorite teams. But when billionaire owners and politicians use our hard earned tax dollars to fund stadiums at the expense of the fan experience and other local priorities, it leaves a bitter taste in our mouths.

It's time for the NFL and its billionaire owners to pay their own way and stop leaving the rest of us high and dry!



Oakland Raiders Owners and Las Vegas Sands Chairman Sheldon Adelson. Image via Kron4.com

You can follow the Sports Fans Coalition on Twitter at https://twitter.com/sportsfanorg.

Ryan Rudominer is Chairman of the Sports Fan Coalition's Mid-Atlantic region, a sports advocacy organization for fans. Rudominer previously co-founded SackNFLTaxBreaks.org, a winning grassroots campaign that successfully sacked the National Football League's nonprofit tax-exempt status, a special exception in the tax code carved out by Congress in the 1960s.

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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Vegas Taxpayers Could Spend A Record $750 Million On A New NFL Stadium


The NHL announced this week that its owners had approved an expansion franchise in Las Vegas, bringing professional sports to the city for the first time. Now, Republican mega-donor and casino mogul Sheldon Adelson wants to bring an NFL team to Vegas too -- and he wants $750 million in taxpayer money to make it happen.


The $750 million, financed with municipal bonds that would be paid off by hotel taxes, would go toward a new domed football stadium Adelson and a development group have proposed, according to Bloomberg. That figure would surpass the $620 million Indianapolis spent on a new stadium for the Colts, making it the biggest public contribution toward a stadium in American history, based on figures compiled last year by the Taxpayer Protection Alliance.


Adelson, who now owns the Las Vegas Review-Journal, is pitching the stadium as a means of enticing the Oakland Raiders to move to Vegas. The Raiders and owner Mark Davis have sought a new publicly funded stadium from the city of Oakland, but Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf has said that while she is confident the city can keep the team, it won't subsidize a new stadium with public money.


In January, Davis tried to relocate the Raiders to Los Angeles, where the team played from 1982 to 1994, but the St. Louis Rams beat him to the punch. He's also visited San Antonio and other cities in an effort to either find a city that will give him hundreds of millions in taxpayer money for a new stadium, or to exert leverage on Schaaf and Oakland to do the same.


The NFL, like America's other pro sports leagues, has been reluctant to consider moving a franchise to Vegas in the past, given its obvious association with legalized gambling. 


But this is a league that loves little more than pressuring cities to get what it wants -- its current stadiums have cost taxpayers more than $7 billion, according to the Taxpayer Protection Alliance -- so if there's anything that can assuage the NFL's Vegas fears, it may just be the chance to take even more money from the public for the benefit of its wealthy owners and billionaires like Adelson.

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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IL: Hidden deals, hefty subsidies keep sports teams in your city

IL: Hidden deals, hefty subsidies keep sports teams in your city | Subsidies: Thomas, E. | Scoop.it
By Scott Reeder | Watchdog.org SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — The most miraculous baseball play of 1988 didn’t happen in a...

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Jason Cain's curator insight, March 22, 2014 10:23 PM

Here again we see the benefits of having a major team in the area along with politicians that do not want to lose a team while they are in office. 

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Are Seattle taxpayers giving away $731M in arena subsidies? - KOMO News

Are Seattle taxpayers giving away $731M in arena subsidies? - KOMO News | Subsidies: Thomas, E. | Scoop.it
Northwest Cable News
Are Seattle taxpayers giving away $731M in arena subsidies?

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