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The perfect work area

The perfect work area | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it

I think this is beautiful. This desk and chair, painted in bright yellow paint, is the perfect foil for all of plants placed here. 


Via Debra Anchors
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Neusa Leandro De Morais Maeda's comment, March 9, 2013 1:34 PM
So beautiful Debra... congratulations..

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Eating dirt can be good for the belly, researchers find

Eating dirt can be good for the belly, researchers find | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it

Most of us never considered eating the mud pies we made as kids, but for many people all over the world, dining on dirt is nothing out of the ordinary. Now an extensive meta-analysis helps explain why.


Via Cathryn Wellner
Britton Bell's insight:

If you read the book "Eat Dirt" by a man who was at death's door after sufffering several years with Crohn's Disease, AND if you like playing in the dirt, or remember when you or your kids played in it and ate it, then you already know what researchers are touting!

 

Yes!  Eating dirt IS good for the digestive system because good soil is chuck full of micro organisms which is processed out of our feeds beginning with the chemcials applied to plants and soil. Some of us remember that sweet smell of healthy soil and fondly recall the dirty faces of tykes after a day out in the yard. 

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Stephanie Jo Rountree's comment, April 5, 2013 10:44 AM
I remember as a kid eating carrots pulled from the garden with dirt on them! Didn't phase me a bit.
Cathryn Wellner's comment, April 5, 2013 11:16 AM
Children enjoy the complex tastes of earth. We move away from that because the adults in our lives are always telling us to stop eating it.
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GMO A Go Go - Truth about GMOs explained in new animated cartoon

From InfomaticFilms.com and sponsored by NaturalNews.com, this new animated cartoon covers all the basics on why GMOs are dangerous.

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Meat inspectors may be missing deadly contamination, audit warns

Meat inspectors may be missing deadly contamination, audit warns | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it

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Avocado Health Benefits: Is This the World’s Most Perfect Food?

Avocado Health Benefits: Is This the World’s Most Perfect Food? | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it

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The Latest McFib: Our Food Is Healthy

The Latest McFib: Our Food Is Healthy | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it
Last week, in what is yet another example of Big Food's symbiotic relationship with the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, McDonald's Director of Nutrition spoke to her fellow colleagues at the Utah Dietetic Association meeting about the chain's ...

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Cathryn Wellner's curator insight, April 3, 2013 12:53 PM

When organizations such as the AND are funded by fast food, why should we listen to them when they advise us about nutritional issues?

Kamna Desai's curator insight, April 18, 2013 4:07 AM

MacD really needs to come up with Health Food if it wants to retain its business !!!

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10 Homemade Organic Pesticides | Natural Health & Organic Living Blog

10 Homemade Organic Pesticides | Natural Health & Organic Living Blog | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it

110 Homemade Organic PesticidesPu

 

Ever wonder what farmers did hundreds of years ago to fight off crop pests? Long before the invention of harmful chemical pesticides (yes, the kind that is linked to cancerous cellular activity), farmers and householders came up with multiple remedies for removing insect infestations from their garden plants.

The following list will offer some of our favorite, all-natural, inexpensive, organic methods for making bug-busting pesticides for your home garden.

1. Neem

Ancient Indians highly revered neem oil as a powerful, all-natural plant for warding off pests. In fact, neem juice is the most powerful natural pesticide on the planet, holding over 50 natural insecticides. This extremely bitter tree leaf can be made in a spray form, or can be bought from a number of reputable companies.

To make your own neem oil spray, simply add 1/2 an ounce of high quality organic neem oil and ½ teaspoon of a mild organic liquid soap (I use Dr. Bronners Peppermint) to two quarts of warm water. Stir slowly. Add to a spray bottle and use immediately.

 

2. Salt Spray

For treating plants infested with spider mites, mix 2 tablespoons of Himalayan Crystal Salt into one gallon of warm water and spray on infected areas.

3. Mineral oil

Mix 10-30 ml of high-grade oil with one liter of water. Stir and add to spray bottle. This organic pesticide works well for dehydrating insects and their eggs.

 

4. Citrus Oil and/or Cayenne Pepper Mix

 

This is another great organic pesticide that works well on ants. Simply, mix 10 drops of citrus essential oil with one teaspoon cayenne pepper and 1 cup of warm water. Shake well and spray in the affected areas.

5. Soap, Orange Citrus Oil & Water

To make this natural pesticide, simply mix 3 tablespoons of liquid Organic Castile soap with 1 ounce of Orange oil to one gallon of water. Shake well. This is an especially effective treatment against slugs and can be sprayed directly on ants and roaches.


6. Eucalyptus oil

A great natural pesticide for flies, bees and wasps. Simply sprinkle a few drops of eucalyptus oil where the insects are found. They will all be gone before you know it.

7. Onion and Garlic Spray

 

Mince one organic clove of garlic and one medium sized organic onion. Add to a quart of water. Wait one hour and then add one teaspoon of cayenne pepper and one tablespoon of liquid soap to the mix. This organic spray will hold its potency for one week if stored in the refrigerator.

8. Chrysanthemum Flower Tea

These flowers hold a powerful plant chemical component called pyrethrum. This substance invades the nervous system of insects rendering them immobile. You can make your own spray by boiling 100 grams of dried flowers into 1 liter of water. Boil dried flowers in water for twenty minutes. Strain, cool and place in a spray bottle. Can be stored for up to two months. You can also add some organic neem oil to enhance the effectiveness.

9. Tobacco Spray

 

Just as tobacco is not good for humans, tobacco spray was once a commonly used pesticide for killing pests, caterpillars and aphids. To make, simply take one cup of organic tobacco (preferably a brand that is organic and all-natural) and mix it in one gallon of water. Allow the mixture to set overnight. After 24-hours, the mix should have a light brown color. If it is very dark, add more water. This mix can be used on most plants, with the exception of those in the solanaceous family (tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, etc.)

10. Chile pepper / Diatomaceous Earth

Grind two handfuls of dry chiles into a fine powder and mix with 1 cup of Diatomaceous earth. Add to 2 liters of water and let set overnight. Shake well before applying.

If you have some easy recipes for making your own organic pesticides, we would love to hear them.

~Dr. G

Related Blogposts:The Benefits of Organic Pesticides7 Tips for Starting Your Own Organic Garden6 Tips for “Going Green” Outside Your House7 Healthy Berries You Should Eat Everyday
    


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It takes a village to raise a vegetable

It takes a village to raise a vegetable | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it

“Farmers need a shitload of support,” says Amy Lounder, an organic farmer who runs Avon River CSA (community-shared, or community-supported, agriculture) in Centre Burlington, NS. “And not just financial support but support in a lot of different ways, like support in information, of learning how to problem solve.”


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Can You Reverse Memory Loss?

Can You Reverse Memory Loss? | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it
Research shows it's possible—and it starts with a trip the gym (Men's Health: Can You Reverse Memory Loss? http://t.co/5TIYafrphI)
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Chandelier in the garden

Chandelier in the garden | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it

Why not?


Via Debra Anchors
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You may think this is "over the top", but having done this myself I can say, "yes perhaps it is, and it is a show stopper" !

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LucyHill's comment, January 9, 2013 1:01 AM
Wonderful idea...
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The perfect work area

The perfect work area | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it

I think this is beautiful. This desk and chair, painted in bright yellow paint, is the perfect foil for all of plants placed here. 


Via Debra Anchors
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Neusa Leandro De Morais Maeda's comment, March 9, 2013 1:34 PM
So beautiful Debra... congratulations..
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Shutters in the garden

Shutters in the garden | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it

New ways with old window shutters. How about painted and then re-purposed in the garden?


Via Debra Anchors
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Recycling in Style

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initiales GG's curator insight, March 11, 2013 9:07 AM

comment se créer un petit coin tranquille au jardin

Mirago's curator insight, March 17, 2013 1:15 PM

why not indeed

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How to Get Rid of Ants Naturally

How to Get Rid of Ants Naturally | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it

When ants invade your home, it's time to battle. You don't have to use ant baits with pesticide in the traps, however, since there are several natural solutions to getting rid of ants and keeping them out.

Keeping Ants at Bay

To discourage ants from coming inside your house, the baby powder trick may work as well because ants won't climb over the powder. There are other options that also involve scent or clever uses, a few of which we've mentioned before:

Put cucumber slices near cracks or entry points because ants apparently hate cucumbers.Draw chalk lines around your doorways and windowsills—as with the baby powder, this may work because ants don't like particles sticking to their feet.Put bay leaves or sprinkle cayenne pepper where the ants are coming in; according toPlanet Green, ants hate the scent of these.Make a cleaning solution of vinegar, water, and about ten drops of tea tree oil and spray it around your counters/doorways/etc. Also similar to the baby powder trick, this makes ants lose their scent trails and stop coming around (hopefully).

Regularly cleaning up in your kitchen, taking out the trash, and sealing door sills and window sills are also all good measures. Have any other ant control suggestions? Let's hear them in the comments.


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New strain of MRSA found in cows

New strain of MRSA found in cows | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it

A new strain of the MRSA "superbug" is found in the milk of British cows and is believed to be infecting humans.


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Food insecurity hits almost 15 percent of US households

Food insecurity hits almost 15 percent of US households | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it
Food security means everyone having access to enough food to maintain a healthy life at all times. In the United States today, nearly 15 percent of households have reported food insecurity at some point during the last year.

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Lauren Shigemasa's curator insight, January 23, 1:58 AM

To not know where your next healthy meal is coming from is a scary thing... We need to see how to make healthy food more affordable and less expensive and scarce!

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Meatless Monday: Kale-Crazy With Chad Sarno

Meatless Monday: Kale-Crazy With Chad Sarno | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it

Good health and good food are intertwined for Austin-based Sarno. He comes from a gregarious, Italian cooking-obsessed family, but grew up as an asthmatic kid who spent much of his childhood sucking on inhalers and "going in and out of hospitals."


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Breeding a Better Veggie - Lancaster Farming

Breeding a Better Veggie - Lancaster Farming | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it

Despite serious flooding from Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee last September, a potato grower in Athens, Pa., still harvested a beautiful crop of Lehigh potatoes that not only resisted flood waters but also common scab and the dreaded golden nematode, one of the world’s most damaging potato pests.

And for that he can thank Cornell University’s plant breeders.

With the continual change in plant pathogen populations, insects, requirements for increases in yields, greater nutrient use efficiency of crops, and changes in consumer preferences, vegetable breeders are continually trying to produce new varieties that will fill the needs. Since its founding, Cornell has been a leader in that area.

In the last few years, Ithaca plant breeders have released a number of new vegetable varieties, including two new potato varieties — Lehigh and Red Maria — from the potato breeding program and Honeynut, a miniature butternut squash from the cucurbit breeding program.

Lehigh, is a mid-late season table stock that has large tubers with yellow flesh. One of the few potato varieties grown in North America with name recognition is the yellow-fleshed Yukon Gold, but it does not yield very well in the Northeast.

A hope for Lehigh is that it has the Yukon Gold yellow flesh and is also well adapted to the region, resulting in good yields of high-quality tubers with few internal defects.

The Pennsylvania grower with the flooded fields noted that the Lehighs were the only variety that yielded well.

As for Lehigh’s flavor, Walter De Jong, an associate professor and director of Cornell’s potato breeding program, said, “I like it. The two potatoes I eat most (and I have lots of choices) are Lehigh and Andover.”

Yellow-flesh potato varieties are not known for being good for chip production, however De Jong said, “Lehigh chips fare better than most yellows, but not as well as white-fleshed chipping potatoes.”

Potato varieties released from Cornell University have often been named after potato growing regions of New York. De Jong works closely with Barb Christ at Penn State to evaluate breeding material from both programs at New York and Pennsylvania testing sites and on this occasion chose to name the breeding clone known earlier as NY 126 after Lehigh, a potato-growing region in Pennsylvania.

“Certified seed should be fairly easy for commercial growers to find, as about 100 acres was planted for seed in 2011 in the Northeast, (New York and Maine) with most being in Maine.”

Red Maria, previously known as NY 129, is a very pretty red-skinned, white flesh table stock potato variety. A good red that retains its color through storage is hard to find, but Red Maria can live up to this test, De Jong said.

 

Read more at:

http://www.lancasterfarming.com/news/northeedition/Breeding-a-Better-Veggie-#.UU0R6hJ_2so


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Do you know dirt about soil? Here's a three-step primer

Do you know dirt about soil? Here's a three-step primer | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it
Gardeners obsess over that stuff in the ground. Year after year, we throw potions and powders at it to break it apart and build it up. But most people dont know dirt about soil. Thats a big problem.

 

Gardeners obsess over that stuff in the ground.

Year after year, we throw potions and powders at it to break it apart and build it up. But most people don't know dirt about soil.

That's a big problem.

"There are so many earnest people doing so many earnestly bad things to their soil," says Jean Reeder, consultant and retired soil scientist. "They mean well, but don't know they're harming it."

Achieving real understanding of soil can be daunting. You don't have to ask many questions before you're buried in hydrogen potential, electrical conductivity and hydrophobicity. It's enough to make your brain beg for simplicity.

So we went to the top minds in what's underfoot. Here's how they broke down.


Read more: Do you know dirt about soil? Here's a three-step primer - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/grow/ci_22885028/do-you-know-dirt-about-soil-heres-three#ixzz2PGrDSjd8

 

Structure: Soil is a building

Here's your first geeky soil term: tilth.

It refers to the suitability of soil to support plant growth, and it's a combination of texture, structure, microorganisms and fertility. Soils with good tilth take many forms.

"You're shooting for a sense of balance that promotes healthy plants. The classic rule of thumb is that an ideal soil is 50 percent solids and 50 percent pore space. Of the pore space, half is filled with air, half with water," said Reeder. "The solids are the minerals (sand, silt, and clay), plus organic matter, which in most Colorado soils is usually less than 3 percent."

Where gardeners go wrong: doing things that decrease pore space (walking on wet soil, for example); and overdoing organic amendments and fertilizers.

Second geeky term: texture. That's how much sand, silt, or clay your soil has. Structure is how those ingredients group together and create pore spaces of various size. All three, clumped with organic matter, form aggregates.

Different soils have different types of aggregates, leading to different types of structure. Topsoils often have a granular structure that allows water to drain rapidly. Soils with high clay content usually have a blocky, chunky structure where water drains moderately well.

But compacted soils, or soils with very high clay content, usually have a plate-y structure. So water moves very slowly through those plates. Think of the differences between a bucket of pea gravel and a bucket of pennies.

"Water and air move differently in soil," said Reeder. "Water coats particles and fill small pore spaces. Air resides in the big pore areas. This is why clay soil holds more water than air; it has really small pore spaces. Sandy soils are the opposite: With mostly large pores, it holds more air, but less water."

When different soil textures come in contact with one another, the results work against plant success. And you thought Congress had gridlock.

Third geeky term: Textural interface — which is what it's called when this happens in soil. If one soil type is layered against another, a boundary is formed. The differences in pore sizes mean that water won't move from one soil into another until the first soil is completely saturated. This is commonly called a "bathtub effect." You get it when you're planting trees or building raised beds and fail to blend the edges of the hole you've dug, and the soil you're putting into it, together. (Scurfing, or mixing, the two edges ensures that water will drain from one type of soil into the other).

Fourth geeky term: Compaction. It's the No. 1 problem in urban soils, compressing pore space and limiting oxygen.

"The worst thing to do is walk on, drive on, or work wet ground," Reeder says. "When you do that, you measurably increase compaction."

The best time to deal with compaction is before landscaping goes in, by adding organic matter. But if the landscape is already installed, you can help by making paths to walk on, aerating the lawn, or planting cover crops in vegetable gardens. In perennial beds, a blanket of mulch prevents compaction when you're weeding and working.

And a final, non-geeky term: caution.

Be sparing when adding organic matter and fertilizer to gardens, Reeder said. Too much of a good thing ceases to be helpful. Many commercial composts, especially the animal-manure based


Read more: Do you know dirt about soil? Here's a three-step primer - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/grow/ci_22885028/do-you-know-dirt-about-soil-heres-three#ixzz2PGrleVXQ
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Read more: Do you know dirt about soil? Here's a three-step primer - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/grow/ci_22885028/do-you-know-dirt-about-soil-heres-three#ixzz2PGrf6tqK
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Read more: Do you know dirt about soil? Here's a three-step primer - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/grow/ci_22885028/do-you-know-dirt-about-soil-heres-three#ixzz2PGrXWUdG
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Read more: Do you know dirt about soil? Here's a three-step primer - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/grow/ci_22885028/do-you-know-dirt-about-soil-heres-three#ixzz2PGrOiikk
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Biology: Soil is a zoo

Within the soil is a teeming community of bacteria, fungi and soil fauna such as protozoa and nematodes, says Mary Stromberger, associate professor of soil microbiology in the Department of Soil and Crop Sciences at Colorado State University.

Bacteria are only the simplest life forms in soil.

Extremely tiny bacteria break down dead plant material. Then they excrete a sticky waste that holds soil particles together. Called "biological glue," this gummy material is vital to keeping soil together and helping roots grow.

"As decomposers go after carbon, they excrete unused nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus, turning them into a form the plant can take up. This is known as mineralization," Stromberger explained.

Some bacteria even live in symbiosis with the plant, colonizing roots and converting the very nutrients those roots need. Gardeners planting peas or beans, for example, often inoculate their seed with the bacteria Rhizobium. This gives the plant a head start.

Fungi in the soil often work to help plants, too. Some wrap hyphae — long strands of cells — around soil particles to hold them together. They also decompose plant litter. And some, such as mycorrhizae, take up residence on plant roots. There, they pull carbon from the plant and in return, make phosphorus, nitrogen, and micronutrients to feed the plant. They even specialize: ectomycorrhizae grow along the surface of tree roots, while arbuscular mycorrhizae grow within the roots of grasses, vegetables, and shrubs.

Healthy communities need predators, Stromberger said. Soil life has its share.

Protozoa and nematodes swim through the water in the soil to feed on bacterial or fungal spores, keeping these populations in check. The fungus Trichoderma wraps its hyphae around other fungi, then releases a digestive enzyme that dissolves them so the Trichoderma can feast. (Before you feel sorry for the victim, it's often pest fungi, such as Phytopthora, that are on the dinner plate).

Such benefits from soil microorganisms are what Stromberger focuses on in her research. She points to antibiotics, streptomycin, and cancer-fighting drugs that have their origins in soil biology.

But her driving focus is how to harness the beneficial side effects of our tiny soil neighbors. "I'm interested in soil's role in food security, sustaining it in the face of drought."

So: that handful of grayish brown stuff from your yard is really a zoo. What can you do to conserve its life forms?

Stromberger: "To build a healthy community, you need good organic matter. That's lots of food for those species. Then you need good structure of the soil. Don't disturb it. Tilling rips up fungal hyphae, and many can't survive that."

Vegetable gardeners need to add organic material, she acknowledged, but they should be cautious and limit the number of times soil is tilled. Leave as much surface residue as you can, and your soil will feed the plants that feed you.

Chemistry: Soil is a symphony

If soil is a symphony, pH is its tympani. It speaks loudly. Muting its effect, or at least helping it not overtake the rest of the ensemble, takes long and careful orchestration.

That's why we turn to Thomas Borch, CSU associate professor of environmental soil chemistry.

Recently named one of the world's top 15 brightest minds in this area, Borch is passionate about soil conservation, and explained why understanding pH is key to understanding the fate of pesticides, nutrients and contaminants in the ground.

"So much is influenced by pH, and any change to that can potentially change the availability — or toxicity — of a substance," he said.

These two letters express a measure of the acidity or alkalinity of a soil. The scale is 1 to 14, and 7 is neutral. Most Colorado soils are slightly alkaline (above 7). And that's a condition Borch said is difficult to change because of our soil's high amounts of calcium carbonate.

"When you add something like sulfur (to an alkaline substance) in water, it releases acid. But calcium carbonate, dissolved in water, is a base, (so) together they neutralize each other," or cancel each other out. Meaning: You're wasting your time and money.

In fact, Borch said, "We have so much calcium carbonate, whenever you add a little acid, it neutralizes it; add more, it neutralizes that, and so forth. This is called buffering." And it's why you're never going to get a yard full of soil that acid-loving plants adore.

What you can do is this: Add organic material. It gradually lowers pH over the long term — we're talking a decade here — plus it benefits many other things. "Take good compost and till it in, then add a layer each year and turn that in if you really want to change pH."

Because here's the real deal with soil: We've broken it down into structure, biology and chemistry, but all three of these properties interact. And organic matter helps them all.

"Organic matter increases the water holding capacity of the soil; you'll have water available to plants over a longer time. It increases the aggregation of soil, so you increase oxygen. It increases nutrient retention, so they're less likely to leach away. It limits erosion and stimulates a healthy microbial community," Borch explains.

It does more: It actually prevents pollution. Leaching and runoff of nutrients, pesticides, and contaminants is where Borch focuses his research. "What really controls the fate of pesticides, nutrients, and contaminants in the ground is retention, binding it to soil minerals or soil organic matter," he said.

Good soil structure and biology keep nutrients and pesticides from flowing right out of the soil. If your soil is healthy, it helps the good stuff bind to soil, meaning a Colorado cloudburst won't wash it away into groundwater, where it does your plants no good and may do harm. They limit how much damage can do.

Borch is passionate that organic management of lawns and landscapes is vital to keeping soil healthy. Overapplications of chemical fertilizers, by contrast, are harmful in a variety of ways. Phosphate, a negatively charged ion, binds to soil minerals such as iron oxides and remains there — unless rainfall or irrigation causes runoff of soil. Then it flows into the stormwater system. Even worse, nitrogen is highly water soluble. It leaches right down into groundwater.

Overapplication of either chemical has ripple effects throughout the environment, making it even more important to apply at the right time and in the right amount.

Borch says it's better and safer to use organic fertilizer that is slowly released through the action of microbes. "It's much easier to control than synthetic soil amendments. You don't' have to be afraid of contamination by runoff or leaching. But if you want to use synthetic, follow the directions on the bag for when, how much, and don't over-apply it."

Carol O'Meara is a local gardening enthusiast. Read her blog at gardeningafterfive.wordpress.org.


Read more: Do you know dirt about soil? Here's a three-step primer - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/grow/ci_22885028/do-you-know-dirt-about-soil-heres-three#ixzz2PGqyflDF
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Giri Kumar's comment, April 2, 2013 7:10 AM
The article has to be read in original for more info. Thank You.
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How Your Personality Impacts Your Health | Anne Garland Enterprises

How Your Personality Impacts Your Health | Anne Garland Enterprises | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it
RT @AGEnterprises: Learn what new science is saying about your health and reproduction straight from Dr. Dorothy Martin-Neville, Ph.D. http://t.co/1BTwYXa1
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Hidden in plain sight

Hidden in plain sight | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it

Since you're stuck with it, here's a smart way to disguise that ugly utility box. A simple slipcover box made of bead board and topped with a birdhouse covers up the eyesore and draws nature into your yard.


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Nicer looking than a hitching post !

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Melody Yesterday's comment, March 29, 2013 3:04 PM
<3
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Wall planters

Wall planters | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it

Using flip-flops and coffee mugs, this creative gardener added interest to a wall.


Via Debra Anchors
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Every well appointed "garden" office needs coffee cups - 

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HiddenValleyRV.net's curator insight, March 9, 2013 10:40 AM

Lightweight and easy to move when you do...these planters are perfect for the RVer

Neusa Leandro De Morais Maeda's comment, March 9, 2013 1:35 PM
delicated
Shari Hrabec's comment, March 25, 2013 11:37 AM
These are all over Pinterest...think alot of us are going to have fun with this come summer!
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Cinder blocks become a garden bench

Cinder blocks become a garden bench | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it

Follow the photo-link to find the supplies needed to create this DIY bench.


Via Debra Anchors
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"Rock" Garden Furniture !

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Gîtes de Lauzanac's curator insight, March 8, 2013 4:31 AM

Very easy to create especially after having done big works to your home! We can do that even if we prefer to use stones!

 

Art Home Naturel''s curator insight, April 4, 2013 3:28 AM

Une réalisation facile à mettre en place... Attention tout de même à bien stabiliser les agglos et les transversales en bois. 

Art Home Naturel''s curator insight, April 4, 2013 3:36 AM

Une autre façon de se reposer après une bonne journée de travaux...

Pensez à bien stabiliser les agglos et les traverses de bois, autrement vous risqueriez de vous recycler en cascadeur...  ;-)

Rescooped by Britton Bell from Upcycled Garden Style
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Stone PAVERS become stone PLANTERS

Stone PAVERS become stone PLANTERS | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it

This wonderful DIY idea will provide you with the look of expensive stone planters for a fraction of the cost. 

 

Follow the photo-link to read more.


Via Debra Anchors
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Cheryl Williams's comment, April 5, 2013 2:18 PM
What a brilliant idea... I think I'll make some of these! #gardening
bancoideas's curator insight, April 8, 2013 12:46 PM

¿que opinas de esta #idea?

Art Home Naturel''s curator insight, April 29, 2013 11:32 AM

Il vous reste des dalles utilisées pour votre terrasse????.... voici une idée originale et pour le coups, assortie à votre extérieur... 

 

Avec du ni clou ni vis, votre jardinière prendra forma en un rien de temps.

 

Prévoyez quand même un plastique à l'intérieur afin que si de la terre devait s'échapper, qu'elle ne vous salisse pas votre belle terrasse....

Scooped by Britton Bell
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Four Rules of Meal Planning

Four Rules of Meal Planning | Essentially Good Information | Scoop.it
I loved the feedback you offered me Friday about which topics you enjoy reading about. A popular request was meal planning. It just so happens I could talk all day about this topic.
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