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Brits are genetically grumpier

Brits are genetically grumpier | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
New research from the University of Warwick has revealed that the Brits, French and Americans are more likely to be grumpy
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Article discusses research presented at the ESRC Festival of Social Science.

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It is being a misery that keeps me going

It is being a misery that keeps me going | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
HURRAH! I’m a grumpy old woman – and it’s not my fault!
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Article discussing research to be presented at the Happiness Around the World Festival of Social Science event.

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​Brits genetically ‘programmed’ to be grumpy

​Brits genetically ‘programmed’ to be grumpy | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
According to research published on Thursday, Brits are more likely to be grumps because they possess a “short form” version of a gene that produces serotonin – the neurochemical which controls happiness levels in the brain.
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Article discussing research to be presented at the Happiness Around the World Festival of Social Science event.

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Feeling grumpy? Britons were officially BORN to be miserable

Feeling grumpy? Britons were officially BORN to be miserable | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
HERE'S some news to brighten your day - Britons are born to be miserable and down–trodden, according to new research.
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Article discussing research to be presented at the Happiness Around the World Festival of Social Science event.

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Feeling grumpy? Britons were officially BORN to be miserable

Feeling grumpy? Britons were officially BORN to be miserable | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
HERE'S some news to brighten your day - Britons are born to be miserable and down–trodden, according to new research.
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Article discussing research to be presented at the Happiness Around the World Festival of Social Science event.

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DNA key to Danish happiness: study

They are officially the happiest people on Earth and now scientists think they know why life is such a dream for the Danes.
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The article features findings from economists at the ESRC-funded Centre for Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy.

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Richard Layard: ‘Money is not the only thing affecting people’s happiness’

Richard Layard: ‘Money is not the only thing affecting people’s happiness’ | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
How could we become a happier nation? One pioneering economist has spent the best part of a decade arguing that we simply must find an answer to this question – gaining the support of David Cameron, who backed the notion of happiness as “the new GDP”.
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Interview with the founder of the ESRC-funded Centre for Economic Performance.

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However you spend it, money isn't the key to happiness

However you spend it, money isn't the key to happiness | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it

How important, if at all, is having more money for our happiness and well-being? Unsurprisingly this question stimulates a lot of opinion and debate.But are people accurate in their predictions about the benefits of having money?


A new study published in the Journal of Positive Psychology highlights that people are often mistaken in how spending our money might benefit our lives. People are prone to forecasting errors – that is, they mistakenly predict future events to be better or worse than they actually turn out to be.

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This article was written by Christopher Boyce, Research Fellow at Stirling Management School at University of Stirling, Christopher is funded by the ESRC.


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Emotional health in childhood ‘is the key to future happiness’

Emotional health in childhood ‘is the key to future happiness’ | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
LSE study says money, success and good grades are less important
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Article features research from the ESRC-funded Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

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Olivia Perez's curator insight, November 13, 11:03 PM
Defiantly being a happier healthy child is a key factor to having a happier life as an adult. They said that income gives you 1% of satisfactory as an adult, so therefore as humans happiness has to come not from accomplishments, but because you grew up happy and that you have a happy healthy life.
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It's official: The British are born to be miserable, new research finds

It's official: The British are born to be miserable, new research finds | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
“The British do not expect happiness,” claimed English writer Quentin Crisp – and it appears he may have been right.
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Article discussing research to be presented at the Happiness Around the World Festival of Social Science event.

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Americans, Brits and French are born miserable: Length of gene determines how happy you will be

Americans, Brits and French are born miserable: Length of gene determines how happy you will be | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it

The French are often accused of being grumpy and dismissive. But Britons and Americans are also hardwired to be miserable, scientists claim, the Daily Mail reports.

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Article discussing research to be presented at the Happiness Around the World Festival of Social Science event.

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Americans and Brits are genetically programmed to be MISERABLE 

Americans and Brits are genetically programmed to be MISERABLE  | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
  • Scientists at Warwick University discovered the gene responsible for serotonin levels in the brain is responsible for setting your mood
  • The shorter the gene, the lower the levels of the mood-enhancing hormone
  • Longer the gene the higher the levels of serotonin, thus people are happier
  • Danes found to be happiest, and have longest form of the gene
  • But those in France are most miserable, with the shortest form
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Article discussing research to be presented at the Happiness Around the World Festival of Social Science event.

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Britons are born grumpy. But cheer up, French are worse

Britons are born grumpy. But cheer up, French are worse | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
The British, Americans and the French are born to be miserable and no amount of money or sunshine will change that, researchers suggest
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Article discussing research to be presented at the Happiness Around the World Festival of Social Science event.


Please note, you may need to pay to access this article.

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Want To Be Happy? Get Some Danish DNA

Want To Be Happy? Get Some Danish DNA | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it

"Some people seem to be happy no matter what. If you visit many places in Africa, even when the existence may seem hard to Europeans or Americans, a lot of people are quite happy."

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The article features findings from economists at the ESRC-funded Centre for Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy.

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The Secret To Happy Kids: A Bit of TV and the Odd Takeaway

Seven-year-olds are happier when they are allowed some sweets, snacks and television time, rather than none at all, suggests a study of children's
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The data for the study was gathered from the Millennium Cohort Study of 12,877 children, and their parents, born in 2000 and surveyed in 2008. The MCS was funded by the ESRC.

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