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Why playing video games is good for your brain

Why playing video games is good for your brain | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it

Whether playing video games has negative effects is something that has been debated for 30 years, in much the same way that rock and roll, television, and even the novel faced much the same criticisms in their time.

ESRC's insight:

Author, Mark Griffiths, receives funding from the ESRC.

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Denise Price's comment, June 17, 2015 7:04 PM
The things stated in this article are very interesting because of the fact that most people feel that video games have a negative impact. My children love video games too, and I will be sure to share this information with them.
Marc Magliari's comment, June 20, 2015 12:32 AM
While there is some research saying gaming is good for your brain, when is it good for your heart, the emotional one?
Joe Kasper's comment, June 29, 2015 9:00 PM
I've always been a firm believer that video games have a positive effect on people so it's refreshing to see that studies are coming out that agree with my opinion. I can't stand people who say video games have a negative effect on people but have no evidence to back it up.
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Video Games Are Good For Your Brain - Here's Why

Video Games Are Good For Your Brain - Here's Why | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
ESRC's insight:

Dr Mark Griffiths, the author of the article, has received funding from the ESRC.

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Brain Training Games Won't Help Children Do Better at School

Brain Training Games Won't Help Children Do Better at School | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it

There has been a big increase recently in the number of computerised “brain training” programs marketed at young children.

ESRC's insight:

Article written by Emma Blakey who is an ESRC PhD researcher.

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RaiseYourIQ.com's curator insight, August 12, 2014 3:43 PM

add your insight...

Terry Doherty's curator insight, August 15, 2014 11:32 AM

Good to know ... science doesn't completely back up these claims. The analysis about the areas of the brain that are affected and their capacity to 'retain' this brain training really hit home.

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Video-game playing for less than an hour a day is linked with better-adjusted children

A new study suggests video game-playing for less than an hour a day is linked with better-adjusted children and teenagers. The research, carried out by Oxford University, found that young people who indulged in a little video game-playing were associated with being better adjusted than those who had never played or those who were on video games for three hours or more.

ESRC's insight:

Article cites data from the British Household Panel Survey which is funded by the ESRC

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Gaming communities can self-police against bigotry, research shows

Gaming communities can self-police against bigotry, research shows | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it

Games industry professionals can make gaming communities more tolerant by actively promoting and exhibiting inclusive values, according to new research. 

ESRC's insight:

The article cites research by the ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS) at Lancaster University.

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Playing video games is good for your brain – here’s how

Playing video games is good for your brain – here’s how | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it

Whether playing video games has negative effects is something that has been debated for 30 years, in much the same way that rock and roll, television, and even the novel faced much the same criticisms in their time.

ESRC's insight:

Author, Mark Griffiths, receives funding from the ESRC.


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Daily gaming is not inherently harmful to kids

Daily gaming is not inherently harmful to kids | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it

The positive and negative effects of daily gaming are small, and indicate that broader social issues are responsible for both.

ESRC's insight:

The article cites the Understanding Society Household Longitudinal Study which is ESRC-funded.

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How gaming behaviour can spill over into real life

How gaming behaviour can spill over into real life | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
These phenomena tend to occur when video game players become so immersed in their gaming that, when they stop playing, they sometimes transfer some of their virtual gaming experiences to the real world.
ESRC's insight:

Author Dr Mark Griffiths has received research funding from a wide range of organisations including the Economic and Social Research Council.

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