ESOL Bilingual Education
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NABE - Bilingual Education

NABE - Bilingual Education | ESOL Bilingual Education | Scoop.it
Kassandra Saravia's insight:

The key point of bilingual education in helping a student learn English is that they can't advance in an unknown language without a good and continuously growing base in their native language. The article even says, "Once we can read in one language, we can read in general." The easiest way to abide by this statement in helping a student learn a new language is to increase their knowledge in their primary language before teaching them a new one, or rather at the same time that they are expanding it. At the same time it's also important to have time to teach the students English directly in ESL classrooms. 

I do agree with the sheltered classes in the beginning in order to help them feel comfortable with the language before full immersion but I don't think that it should be the whole day for them because it is important to be around conversational English which can be of great difference to the educational English terms having to do with science and math. The students also need to learn how to speak comfortably and that is something that can only be possible with them also being in class with students speaking casually. 

This article also points out that there have people who have succeeded without the bilingual education programs but that also has to do with the neighborhoods that the students grow up in. If a student is immersed in a Spanish speaking neighborhood then he will not have help learning English because those around him don't and so he may also fail to see the point. The other part is that the students who succeed without it need to have knowledge of subject matter in thier language because that can translate over into English given that they already have a base to build off of. 

It also works with langages besides Spanish of course and it is possible with languages such as Chinese like I have scooped earlier with the school that has a Mandarin Chinese immersion program.

The evidence that is used to go against bilingual programs isn't strong enough. The programs just need improvements and support both from the communities around them and financially. A very important way that it can be helped is in providing English books to those learners so that they can continue to work on the language at home as well and improve all around. 

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Slam Poet Wants To Change The Way You Think About ESL Education

Slam Poet Wants To Change The Way You Think About ESL Education | ESOL Bilingual Education | Scoop.it
The statistics regarding education for English as a Second Language Learners (ESL) in America are bleak and abstract: According to George Washington University Face the Facts initiative, there is only one public school teacher for every 150 ESL...
Kassandra Saravia's insight:

I LOVE THIS SPOKEN WORD WITH EVERY OUNCE OF MY BEING. I have watched it so many times and I could watch it so many more times without getting tired of it. He points out all the problems that are present in ESL education and the way people see them. One of the quotes that he says that angers me about this situation is that a senator said "throwing money at an urban school is like giving caviar to a dog, they wont know what to do with it" This is terrible, because giving money to these schools to improve them can only help, it isn't just throwing money away, they aren't animals and shouldn't be compared as such. This senator has to really look at how these schools need help and stop being so close minded in the way that these students need help. Hearing that someone actually said this, blew my mind because it sounds terrible and against socioeconomic diversity in schools. Super frustrating.  

Something that I loved is when he asks, "Since when does being a teacher mean having to swear not to help?" This is something that hurts me in thinking about there being students that are still trying to learn a language that they are so uncomfortable with and being unable to help them because those in charge of education THINK that one year is enough to be fluent. That is literally preposterous and it shows how flawed the system is and how they don't really take into account the needs of the students. 

THE TRUEST THING he said that I loved the most is, "Learning to read in a new language before you know how to read in your own is like learning to walk while a pitbull is chasing you." This quote is a serious slap back into reality. It puts things into perspecitve and really shows that the expectations we have for these poor kids are too high when they aren't getting all the help they need and when their heritage and language is a "banned book" as he also says. They are taught to go against it and learn the English language when they don't have the resources or support. The ESL program really needs modifications and this spoken word puts all of it into perspective.  

 

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MandarinImmersionBrochure.pdf

Kassandra Saravia's insight:

This shows that it doesn't even just have to be Spanish that students are immersed in. There are many languages spoken and this school gives students the opportunity to learn a great language, Mandarin has the highest number of native speakers than any other language. This pamplet points out all the things that other people do about the benefits of bilingual education and the way it helps students in the long run. Elementary school is a great time to start this because their brains are still developing and new languages can be embraced easier. The children still learn the curriculum that they need but also get to learn much more. 

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Direct Method of Teaching English | Blog About ESL

Direct Method of Teaching English | Blog About ESL | ESOL Bilingual Education | Scoop.it
The Direct Method of Teaching English is a way that learners acquire the English language. Developed over 100 years ago, this method is still widely used today.

Via Will Lake, Roselink, Inna Piankovska, Luciana Viter, BilingualStudyGuides
Kassandra Saravia's insight:

This is a very good insight to one of the ways that different languages are taught, whether it is English or another language. Peronsally I don't feel that this quite works because it is feeding them the language and having them simply memorize words instead of having them understand it and think in the language which would then allow them to grow as well. It also doesn't seem very plausible to be done in school because it would take away from learning the lessons and not help develop their conversational skills in said language. 

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Carmenne Kalyaniwala-Thapliyal's curator insight, October 5, 2013 3:10 AM

Not sure how effective this way of teaching is, though you can't deny its influence on the communicative method of teaching. Certainly makes good food for thought.

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U.S. Faces New Education Challenges

U.S. Faces New Education Challenges | ESOL Bilingual Education | Scoop.it
MIAMI — Duna Lopez started school in Miami last fall not knowing a single word of English. The 8-year-old girl from Barcelona, Spain, with dark blond hair was placed in the Coral Way Bilingual K-8 Center, the nation's oldest bilingual school.
Kassandra Saravia's insight:

One of the pressing new issues in education is that of English learners entering schools; students who do not have English as their first language. The U.S. is trying to figure out ways to deal with this but it is difficult because it is hard to find well qualified teachers and because the methods of teaching are so scattered and not agreed upon. The other struggle is the fact that most of the students who do not have English as their first language also live in lower income neighborhoods with schools that lack enough funding for things including a program that could help them. Because of this, the programs are not even helping them and so they don't ever really understand and may just drop out of school. One of the statistics that stands out is that 4.7 million students were classified as "English language learners" because they have not acheived proficiency in English in the 2009-2010 school year. This is such a vast number of students that there needs to be more action taken in order to make sure that they are being taken care of all across the board. 

The first thing that is a key issue is the fact that people can't seem to decide which method of teaching and helping them is best; whether they deserve a bilingual program or an English only program because apparently that's a way that would really work. In reality an English only program would be like trying to just throw them in the deep end and assuming that they'll learn how to swim eventually. However, it is pretty possible that they would instead just drownwithout the resources and help that they need in order to reach a level where they can be on par with their English speaking classmates. 

Duna Lopez of this article is an example of how the bilingual programs help best because it not only allows them to be immersed in the language without being overwhelmed but also improving their own language the way it should be done. She did not know any English upon entering the school system and seven months later, she is participating in the class discussions feeling comfortable with the English she is learning. The school she is in has half the day in English and half in Spanish with the students who need assistance in English being pulled out for more help only during language arts. This way they aren't being taken out of subjects that they need to be in the class to understand but instead they are getting help in the subject they are missing in class. This type of programs lets the students learn both the formal English language while gaining conversational English being surrounded by English speakers as well. Full immersion bilingual programs like this have been studied as being the most effective way of learning and teaching the students. The next thing of course is that there need to be teachers that are qualified enough to pull off these programs. While I understand that the price of providing programs for these students is high, letting them drop behind neglected brings down the whole education system with it. 

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The Politics & Efficacy of Bilingual & ESL Education in New York City: Exploring the Challenges of English Language Learners by Christina Antonakos-Wallace, Fairouz Hadji | Humanity in Action

The Politics & Efficacy of Bilingual & ESL Education in New York City: Exploring the Challenges of English Language Learners   by Christina Antonakos-Wallace, Fairouz Hadji | Humanity in Action | ESOL Bilingual Education | Scoop.it
Graciella Bravo: Bronx, New York Born and raised in New York City, Graciela Bravo spoke only Spanish as a child.  Immediately placed in a bilingual…
Kassandra Saravia's insight:

The stories of students who were placed in bilingual versus monolingual education programs vary on the student and their experience based on the quality of the program. This article shows Graciella being unhappy with the bilinugal program she was in that didn't seem to help her and when she went into an all English program she began to fall behind because she didn't understand and then as she did improve her classes still were of lower standards. However other students felt more comfortable in the ESL programs because of course they actually understood the things that were going on and learning the material was more important to them than the fact that their English was taking longer to advance. 

New York has 160,000 students in the ESL programs and the problems with the programs are evident in that the students in these programs or in these schools are performing significantly lower than their counterparts. 

The dilemma with the bilingual programs in New York are that there isn't one specific ethnic group or language besides English spoken because the area is so diverse and they haven't figured out how exactly to address this in a way that would appeal to the variety of people. Another problem which is sad is that of the tachers that are doing the ELL programs, 27% of bilingual teachers and 14% of ESL teachers are uncertified to actually help in these situations and teach the students in a way that is going to be productive. The challenge of balancing keeping the students cultures intact and helping them learn the English language is something that also needs to be kept in consideration. It's all a difficult situation but there needs to be some way to help their education be improved. 

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Bilingual education: Why gutting it hurts us all

Bilingual education: Why gutting it hurts us all | ESOL Bilingual Education | Scoop.it
Hispanic Heritage Month provides the perfect opportunity to explore how bilingual education positively or negatively affect our children. Despite study after study showing that bilingual education ...
Kassandra Saravia's insight:

It was interesting to find an article talking about how bilingual education is something that benefits everybody involved. For children whose first language is Spanish (or any other language) and then get to receive bilingual education in both English and Spanish (or their native language) are able to learn both the curriculum and the English language much easier. It works because they work on expanding their native language and the new language. Same goes for the English speaking students in the class. They get the opportunity to learn another language and it keeps their minds thinking and working throughout the day. Bilingual education helps both types of students in the classroom, it improves their cognitive ability and opens them up to more diverse experiences. It's a plus all around. 

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