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LANDFILL HARMONIC: Inspiring dreams one note at a time!

A heartfelt & moving story of how instruments made from recycled trash bring hope to children whose future is otherwise spiritless.

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Jodi Esaili's insight:

Wonderful!

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chris tobin's curator insight, April 24, 2013 2:11 PM

What a wonderful thing!   This is a very heartwarming story

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 8, 3:38 PM

One mans' trash is another mans treasure. The typical stereotypes of slums are that they are dirty, poor and lifeless. However, the people in this slum have so much more to offer. Searching through the trash, they are able to piece together junk into recycled instruments that they use to liven the slums, their lives and the world. Music is a way to brighten their today and look forward to brighter tomorrows. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 17, 8:21 AM

This video was very moving.  I was surprised how the recycled instruments sounded exactly like the real things.  I think this should make us think about how much of the trash we generate could be put to some use besides rotting in a landfill.  It also shows the ingenuity of people to find a use for a resource even if that resource is trash.  It just goes to show that the saying “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure,” is true.

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America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young

America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it

"Although we seldom think about them this way, most American communities as they exist today were built for the spry and mobile. We've constructed millions of multi-story, single-family homes where the master bedroom is on the second floor, where the lawn outside requires weekly upkeep, where the mailbox is a stroll away. We've designed neighborhoods where everyday errands require a driver's license. We've planned whole cities where, if you don't have a car, it's not particularly easy to walk anywhere — especially not if you move gingerly.

This reality has been a fine one for a younger country. Those multi-story, single-family homes with broad lawns were great for Baby Boomers when they had young families. And car-dependent suburbs have been fine for residents with the means and mobility to drive everywhere. But as the Baby Boomers whose preferences drove a lot of these trends continue to age, it's becoming increasingly clear that the housing and communities we've built won't work very well for the old."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 11, 10:36 AM

Population change is frequently a concern of city planners at the local level.  This article shows that major demographic shifts are going to mean major changes in our patterns in our cities as we become a 'greying' society. 


Tagsurban, unit 7 cities, housing, sprawlneighborhood, planning, densityplanning, declining populations, population, demographic transition model, USA.

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Scottish Independence

"Scotland is about to vote on whether to secede from the UK. There are solid arguments on both sides."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 10:04 AM

Admittedly, this video is filled with stereotypes, bad words and a strong political bias all delivered in John Oliver's trademark style--it's also filled with incorrect statements which I hope most people can recognize as humor, but it captures college students' attention.  If, however, you are looking for a more insightful piece, I recommend Jeffrey Sach's article titled "The Price of Scottish Independence," or this summary of the 9 issues that would confront an independent Scotland.  Independence in Europe today doesn't mean what it used to, and this vote will be fascinating regardless of the outcome.    


Tags: devolution, supranationalism, politicalEurope, UK.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, Today, 1:53 PM

The Vote is in

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GE Teach

"Overview video for GE Teach http://geteach.com/maps."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 12, 12:51 PM

GE Teach is a powerful mapping platform that harnesses the power of Google Earth into a user-friendly format.  I've you've ever wanted multiple maps on the screen to compare and contrast, this is great tool.  Designed by an APHG teacher, this is a great way to bring geospatial technologies into the classroom.  With multiple data layers of physical and human geography variables, this becomes an interactive globe.  Click here for the video tutorial.  


Tags: googlemapping, virtual tours, geospatialAPHG, edtech.

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Why Democrats Can’t Win the House

Why Democrats Can’t Win the House | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
Thanks to demographics, the Republicans have a virtual stranglehold on the House of Representatives.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 7, 9:39 PM

The first reaction might be to blame partisan redistricting (a.k.a. gerrymandering) for the the political gridlock between the presidential results and House of Representatives.  Gerrymandering does play a role, but the spatial concentrations and distributions of voting constituencies explain why the Democrats have recently won the popular vote in 5 out of the last 6 presidential elections, but can't control the House of Representatives.  Metro areas are highly left-leaning, currently creating a national majority for Democrats, but that high concentration is a drawback when trying to win a majority of the seats in the House.  This is a good article as a primer for electoral geography.  


Tags: political, regions, spatial, unit 4 political.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 14, 8:39 AM

Demographics and political geography affect elections.

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How Google represents disputed borders between countries

How Google represents disputed borders between countries | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
INTERNATIONAL borders are often tricky to chart on maps. Tangible topographic features can be pinned down by satellite imagery but the boundaries between many states...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 4, 9:05 PM

I've shared some links in the past that some mapping dilemmas with current events in Ukraine.  Google Maps shows international borders differently and National Geographic maps show Crimea as a part of Russia.  In this podcast we learn that this isn't the only international border dispute that is displayed differently in Google Maps.  Google uses over 30 distinct versions of international borders because there is an underlying geopolitical dimension to cartographyHowever, this article from the Economist is more explicitly geographic in its analysis of the situation and how the discipline(s) of geography/cartography shape the political situation; maps are NOT just a reflection of reality on the ground.  To paraphrase the cartographer Andy Shears, there is a lot of teaching applications and discussion material in these articles. 


Questions to Ponder: Why have different cartography for different audiences?  Why does this small cartographic decision matter? How can maps be used to lie/stretch the truth?  How to governments derive political legitimacy from maps?   Why is Google the cartographic gatekeeper?


Tags: google, Ukraine, mapping, borders, political.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 6:10 AM

How does politics affect map-making? 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 9:36 AM

unit 4

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How to Follow the Iceland and Papua New Guinea Volcano Eruptions

How to Follow the Iceland and Papua New Guinea Volcano Eruptions | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
Webcams, Twitter, and data visualizations show you what's going on with Bárðarbunga and Mount Tavurvur.

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Beautiful Landscapes

"Here's a collection of timelapses I shot during the past year. Amazing landscapes from California, Arizona, Bahamas, Florida, Japan, Taiwan to Italy."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 29, 7:04 AM

Part of a teaching geography is showing the wonders of the Earth in as way that will hopefully spark some awe, curiosity, and desire to see more of the planet.  I think this video is a nice primer for that.  


Tags: landscape, time lapsevideo.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 6:47 AM

APHG-Unit 1

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Continent by continent, TEDGlobal talks

Continent by continent, TEDGlobal talks | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
Here, go around the world in less than 180 minutes with TEDGlobal talks.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 21, 2013 12:20 PM

I've linked various TED talks on this site; this playlist is a quick global tour feature some old favorites and ones that were new to me. 


Tags: TED, worldwide, and video.

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The First Day of School Around the World

The First Day of School Around the World | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
Take a look at the first day of school celebrations around the world!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 28, 7:29 AM

Access to education is one of the great indicators of development and political stability--educators wish nothing but the best education possible for the next generation, but the experience is quite variable across the globe.  As many places have recently started school again, this article is a reminder that this practice is experienced differently around the world. 


TagseducationK12, developmentperspective, worldwide.

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The 9 biggest myths about ISIS

The 9 biggest myths about ISIS | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
If you want to understand the Islamic State, better known as ISIS, the first thing you have to know about them is that they are not crazy. Murderous adherents to a violent medieval ideology, sure. But not insane.

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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, August 31, 1:24 PM

Perhaps most people should read this. Most of this is true

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 6:50 AM

APHG-Unit 4

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 6:17 AM

things can't get more 'current' then understanding ISIS

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Welcome To Geography!

"Lets start off the new school year in style! This is a re-imagining of an older resource designed to introduce the subject to new students in a highly visual manner.  Feel free to use & share it."


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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, August 24, 8:59 PM

Introducción a la Geografía.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 12:29 PM

APHG-Intro

Sally Egan's curator insight, August 31, 3:32 PM

This is a great introduction to a Geography course, covering both the content and the fieldwork and investigation, tools and skills.

 

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Animated GIFs of Earth Over Time

Animated GIFs of Earth Over Time | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it

"It took the folks at Google to upgrade these choppy visual sequences from crude flip-book quality to true video footage. With the help of massive amounts of computer muscle, they have scrubbed away cloud cover, filled in missing pixels, digitally stitched puzzle-piece pictures together, until the growing, thriving, sometimes dying planet is revealed in all its dynamic churn. The images are striking not just because of their vast sweep of geography and time but also because of their staggering detail."


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Sally Egan's curator insight, August 26, 3:42 PM

This is a great demonstration of human impacts on ecosystems. 7 locations in the world show dramatic change over time.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 6:51 AM

APHG-Unit 1

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 6:19 AM

the Impact of HEI

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Welcome To Geography!

"Lets start off the new school year in style! This is a re-imagining of an older resource designed to introduce the subject to new students in a highly visual manner.  Feel free to use & share it."


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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, August 24, 8:59 PM

Introducción a la Geografía.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 12:29 PM

APHG-Intro

Sally Egan's curator insight, August 31, 3:32 PM

This is a great introduction to a Geography course, covering both the content and the fieldwork and investigation, tools and skills.

 

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Alexander von Humboldt

"Have you heard of Alexander von Humboldt? Not likely. The geologist turned geographer and South American explorer was a bit of an 18th century super scientist, traveling over 24,000 miles to understand the relationship between nature and habitat. George Mehler details Humboldt’s major accomplishments and why we should care about them today. See this TED ED lesson plan that accompanies the video."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 18, 1:23 PM

Alexander von Humboldt has been described as the last great ancient geographer concerned with understanding an eclectic cosmography as well as the first modern geographer. He is honored far and wide throughout Latin America and Europe, but given that intellectually people are confused as how to categorize him and classify his contributions, today he is under-appreciated.  Geographers need to reclaim his memory and call his extensive, globetrotting work on a wide range of subjects 'geography.'    


Tags:  historicalbiogeography, unit 1 Geoprinciples, TED.

David R. Perry's curator insight, September 11, 6:41 PM

History does not always remember all it should.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 14, 8:35 AM

Notable Geographer and geologist

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Deported Mexicans find new life at call centers

Deported Mexicans find new life at call centers | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it

"Henry Monterroso is a foreigner in his own country. Raised in California from the age of 5, he was deported to Mexico in 2011 and found himself in a land he barely knew. But the 34-year-old now supervises five employees amid rows of small cubicles who spend eight hours a day dialing numbers across the United States. He is among thousands of deported Mexicans who are finding refuge in call centers in Tijuana and other border cities. In perfect English — some hardly speak Spanish — they converse with American consumers who buy gadgets, have questions about warrantees or complain about overdue deliveries."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 25, 11:03 AM

I have family on both sides of the line; sometimes the border can feel like and artificial an inconsequential separation, at other times it feels like to biggest reality in the region.  This article provides just one intriguing example of how the border both unites and divides economies, peoples, and places.


Tags: Mexicolabormigration, borders, political.    

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Scottish Independence: New flag for UK?

Scottish Independence: New flag for UK? | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
Members of the Flag Institute have created designs for what the Union Flag could look like in the event of independence

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 13, 1:58 PM

I've already posted various links this week on Scottish independence and what it might mean, but I think these two are also worth considering.  Flags are the great icons of state identity, and a UK without Scotland might reconsider it iconography.  This links to an article from the Telegraph and a photogallery with 12 'candidate flags' for a UK that does not include Scotland.  Why might some resist the idea of creating a new national symbol?


Tags: devolutionhistorical, political, states, sovereignty, autonomy, Europe, unit 4 political, UK.

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Teaching September 11th

Teaching September 11th | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it

"In the years after the attacks of September 11, debates about how the United States should respond to the threat of terrorism remain of central importance. The death of Osama bin Laden, the rise of 'homegrown' terrorists, and the use of drones to kill suspected terrorists pose new questions and challenges for policy makers and citizens. Responding to Terrorism: Challenges for Democracy helps students consider the issues surrounding the 9.11.01 attacks and the U.S. response to terrorism in a constructive context that promotes dialogue about future policy directions."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 10, 7:33 AM

This video paired with this lesson plan from the Choices Program will help students explore the human dimension of the September 11 attacks as will this lesson from Teaching History. For a geospatial perspective on 9-11, this page from the Library of Congress, hosted by the Geography and Map Division is a visually rich resources (aerial photography, thermal imagery, LiDAR, etc.)  that show the extent of the damage and the physical change to the region that the terrorist attacks brought.  The images from that day are a part of American memory and change how the event is remembered and memorialized in public spaces.  Also on global terrorism, the Choices Program has also produced some materials on how to teach about ISIS as a new emerging geopolitical threat. 


Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 10, 12:02 PM

I feel that the attacks of September 11 2001 need to be taught in schools.  This being said the levels of what is taught needs to be varied with the grades that the information is being taught to.  Younger grades should understand that we were attacked as it is a very important part of history.  As students become older different things should be taught, such as the death of Osama bin Laden as well as some of the policies that have been implemented to keep the United States safe.

Marianne Naughton's curator insight, September 12, 6:12 AM

Teaching Historical Tragedy ...

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Where China and Kazakhstan Meet

Where China and Kazakhstan Meet | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it

"While people often say that borders aren’t visible from space, the line between Kazakhstan and China could not be more clear in this satellite image. Acquired by the Landsat 8 satellite on September 9, 2013, the image shows northwestern China around the city of Qoqek and far eastern Kazakhstan near Lake Balqash.

The border between the two countries is defined by land-use policies. In China, land use is intense. Only 11.62 percent of China’s land is arable. Pressed by a need to produce food for 1.3 billion people, China farms just about any land that can be sustained for agriculture. Fields are dark green in contrast to the surrounding arid landscape, a sign that the agriculture is irrigated. As of 2006, about 65 percent of China’s fresh water was used for agriculture, irrigating 629,000 square kilometers (243,000 square miles) of farmland, an area slightly smaller than the state of Texas.

The story is quite different in Kazakhstan. Here, large industrial-sized farms dominate, an artifact of Soviet-era agriculture. While agriculture is an important sector in the Kazakh economy, eastern Kazakhstan is a minor growing area. Only 0.03 percent of Kazakhstan’s land is devoted to permanent agriculture, with 20,660 square kilometers being irrigated. The land along the Chinese border is minimally used, though rectangular shapes show that farming does occur in the region. Much of the agriculture in this region is rain-fed, so the fields are tan much like the surrounding natural landscape."

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, food, agriculture, agricultural land change.


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FCHSAPGEO's curator insight, September 4, 12:58 PM

We discussed Landsat images today and borders. Here is a current article to bring it all together.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 6, 1:34 PM

APHG U4

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, September 18, 2:26 AM

what a difference a govt makes!

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Comparing the five major world religions

"It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths. John Bellaimey explains the intertwined histories and cultures of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam."


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Mary Elizabeth's curator insight, August 31, 1:41 PM

perfect for Culture Unit

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 6:48 AM

APHG-Unit 3

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 6:13 AM

Great insight into our 5 major world religions.

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Why everyone should be able to read a map

Why everyone should be able to read a map | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
New research suggests that map reading is a dying skill in the age of the smartphone. Perish the thought, says Rob Cowen

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CT Blake's curator insight, September 2, 1:21 PM

Especially Connor McCloud.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 6:17 AM

this can explain why it is important to NOT always rely on technology. It is good to keep your brain active and the spatial awareness that comes with reading a map is invaluable

Dolors Cantacorps's curator insight, September 5, 12:13 PM

Practiquem-ho a classe doncs!

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Why Finnish babies sleep in boxes

Why Finnish babies sleep in boxes | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it

"For 75 years, Finland's expectant mothers have been given a box by the state. It's like a starter kit of clothes, sheets and toys that can even be used as a bed. And some say it helped Finland achieve one of the world's lowest infant mortality rates."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 30, 12:58 PM

This is a fascinating article that can be a great case study to share with students to allow them to analyze the factors that can improve infant mortality rates.  In Finland the government provided oversight to improve infant mortality rates, pre-natal care and promote good parenting in a way that has had tangible results.  


Tags: Finland, medical, population,demographic transition model, unit 2 population.

Rebecca Renck's curator insight, July 30, 7:52 AM

The gratitude of the Finnish people is to be admired.  Here is a people that instead of accepting a gift from the government as an entitlement see it as a gift with all the excitement and appreciation that a new baby brings with it.  It makes my heart smile to think of how these boxes available to everyone, rich and poor, are received.  This is also a direct look at how family life and babies are being received with love.... lucky babies!

Gillian Campbell's curator insight, July 31, 3:04 AM

It's certainly an interesting one.....

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Fragile States Index

Fragile States Index | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it

"Weak and failing states pose a challenge to the international community. In today’s world, with its highly globalized economy, information systems and interlaced security, pressures on one fragile state can have serious repercussions not only for that state and its people, but also for its neighbors and other states halfway across the globe.  The Fragile States Index (FSI), produced by The Fund for Peace, is a critical tool in highlighting not only the normal pressures that all states experience, but also in identifying when those pressures are pushing a state towards the brink of failure."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 27, 12:31 PM

How can political stability and security be measured?  What constitutes effective governance?  The Fragile States Index (formerly known as the Failed States Index) is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.  There are  12 social, economic, and political/military categories that are a part of the overall rankings and various indicators are parts of the metrics that are a part of this index are:

SOCIAL

•Demographic Pressures 

•Refugees/IDPs

•Group Grievance

•Human Flight and Brain Drain

ECONOMIC

•Uneven Economic Development

•Poverty and Economic Decline

POLITICAL/MILITARY

•State Legitimacy

•Human Rights and Rule of Law

•Public Services

•Security Apparatus

•Factionalized Elites

•External Intervention


Tags: political, statisticsdevelopment, territoriality, sovereignty, conflict, political, devolution, war.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, August 27, 9:57 PM

How can political stability and security be measured? The Fragile States Index is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 6:49 AM

APHG-Unit 4

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EU debates biopiracy law to protect indigenous people

EU debates biopiracy law to protect indigenous people | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
Pharmaceutical companies would need to compensate indigenous people for using their knowhow in creating new medicines

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 25, 7:16 AM

new vocabulary for us all and unit 5!

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 12:27 PM

APHG-Unit 4

Shawn Wright's curator insight, September 7, 5:20 AM

The  Nagoya protocol is an international biological diversity convention. The protocol would at it's core require permission, acknowledgment of source knowledge  or practice and compensation for the use of cultural wisdom.


i don't see Nagoya as a perfect solution - there is a lot of room for language interpretation so slick corporate lawyers will find ways to legally cheat indigenous peoples from their share but I do see it as at least A small step in the right direction.   


The World Health Organisation estimates that 4 billion people, 80% of the world's population, use herbal medicine in primary healthcare. 


Cherokees Believe and have practiced healing from plant and water for thousands of years. Every and any human sickness has a plant who can cure it. Every plant in the world has a purpose if we but learn to hear and understand what that is - there are no weeds to the Cherokee.


Yona Shawn

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What Does Earth Look Like?


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 27, 9:37 AM

Unit 1

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 6:51 AM

APHG-Unit 1

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 6:18 AM

Mapping and Satellite Imagery

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A wide-angle view of fragile Earth

A wide-angle view of fragile Earth | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
In this image-filled talk, Yann Arthus-Bertrand displays his three most recent projects on humanity and our habitat -- stunning aerial photographs in his series "The Earth From Above," personal interviews from around the globe featured in his web project "6 billion Others," and his soon-to-be-released movie, "Home," which documents human impact on the environment through breathtaking video.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 14, 11:38 AM

I've linked galleries of the artistic, aerial photography of Yann Arthus-Bertrand several times before.  In this Ted Talk, you can hear what motivates his artistic vision and the global perspectives that he wants to bring to the fore.  You can also watch the 90-minute video 'Home' that he discusses in the talk here.    

 

Tags: images, art, worldwideTEDenvironment, video.

Diane Johnson's curator insight, August 25, 7:07 AM

Useful for Human Impact DCI!