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Why eating insects makes sense

The world's population is projected to reach 11 billion by the end of the century. Feeding that many people will be a challenge, and it is further complicated by the impact of climate change on agriculture. That is why some people advocate an unusual way to boost the food supply and feed people sustainably: by eating less meat, and more insects.

http://econ.st/1sDYlfM


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 20, 10:00 AM

While it might make economic, nutritional, and environmental sense, I'm sure that many are squeamish at the idea of insects primarily because in violates many deeply engrained cultural taboos.  The main reasons listed in the video for promoting the production and consumption of more insects:

  1. Insects are healthier than meat.
  2. It is cheap (or free) to raise insects.
  3. Raising insects is more sustainable than livestock.


Questions to Ponder: Would you be willing to try eating insects?  How do you think this idea would go over with your family and friends?  What cultural barriers might slow the diffusion of this practice?    


Tagsfoodculturediffusioncultural norms, economicfood production, agriculture.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, June 8, 9:33 AM

When speaking of sustainability, many seek new options, new and more efficient—productively speaking—ways of exploiting resources, different types of energies to make up for the missing future expected quota. However, at not point do they seem to ask themselves what makes inefficiency be the norm, and scarcity the automatic reason to why we need more. The solution is right there, in front of our eyes, and not necessarily in the form of insects., though under the current monetary and economic paradigm, that may seem like a good option.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 19, 10:18 AM

Agriculture, Food security, sustainability, Culture - Yuck factor!

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Five reasons why we should still read maps

Five reasons why we should still read maps | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
The Royal Institute of Navigation says reliance on sat-navs is undermining map-reading skills. So why should we still read maps?

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bernieshoot's curator insight, June 5, 6:56 AM

#geography #education 

Catherine Lamarque-Manuel's curator insight, June 6, 5:55 AM
Lire un carte est toujours le début d'une histoire...
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 6, 12:44 PM

É isso aí!

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Why 12-Foot Traffic Lanes Are Disastrous for Safety and Must Be Replaced Now

Why 12-Foot Traffic Lanes Are Disastrous for Safety and Must Be Replaced Now | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
Let's make "10 not 12!" a new mantra for saving our cities and towns.

 

[12 foot lanes] are wrong because of a fundamental error that underlies the practice of traffic engineering—and many other disciplines—an outright refusal to acknowledge that human behavior is impacted by its environment.

 

Tags: transportation, planning, spatial, scale.


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Prayer in Various Global Faiths

Prayer in Various Global Faiths | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 20, 12:15 PM

See how people around the world pray...video examples of prayer and the cultural/spiritual significance are shown highlighting Buddhists, Mormons, and Sikhs.  Place is very important component to prayer for many and the 4th example shows how some use a labyrinth as a tool to commune with the divine.


Tags: religion, culture, Christianity, Buddhism.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 9:54 AM

unit 3

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 9:55 AM

unit 3

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High Def Earth

NASA Commentator Dan Huot talks with David Hornyak, the project manager of the High Definition Earth Viewing experiment, about the first year of the project’s operation and screens some of its memorable scenes. From a perch on the nadir side of the International Space Station’s Columbus module, HDEV’s four high definition off-the-shelf video cameras have been transmitting clear, sharp views of Earth from an altitude of 250 miles, providing impressive views while testing how the hardware holds up in the harsh environment of Earth orbit.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 12, 8:24 AM

If you are impatient, the 'highlight reel' of this high definition video begins at 3:50 in this clip (but understanding the 'behind-the-scenes' context helps to understand how we get these videos of our planet). 


Tags: mapping, perspective, images, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 28, 9:12 AM

No matter how High Def these images are, how many geopolitical frontier lines can be viewed? The ones that stand out, are where political and economic practices have visible degraded the environment in one country, and not in the other. Otherwise, it's all still one planet for all.

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The Precision Agriculture Revolution

The Precision Agriculture Revolution | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it

"Thousands of years ago, agriculture began as a highly site-specific activity. The first farmers were gardeners who nurtured individual plants, and they sought out the microclimates and patches of soil that favored those plants. But as farmers acquired scientific knowledge and mechanical expertise, they enlarged their plots, using standardized approaches—plowing the soil, spreading animal manure as fertilizer, rotating the crops from year to year—to boost crop yields. Over the years, they developed better methods of preparing the soil and protecting plants from insects and, eventually, machines to reduce the labor required. Starting in the nineteenth century, scientists invented chemical pesticides and used newly discovered genetic principles to select for more productive plants. Even though these methods maximized overall productivity, they led some areas within fields to underperform. Nonetheless, yields rose to once-unimaginable levels: for some crops, they increased tenfold from the nineteenth century to the present.  

Today, however, the trend toward ever more uniform practices is starting to reverse, thanks to what is known as 'precision agriculture.' Taking advantage of information technology, farmers can now collect precise data about their fields and use that knowledge to customize how they cultivate each square foot."

 

Tags: technology, food production, agriculture, agribusiness, spatial, GPS.


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MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:29 AM

Ag Unit

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 11:52 AM

Development and diffusion of agriculture-

This article explains how agriculture has developed and grown for thousands of years, and today with our technology, we can do what seemed impossible to the past peoples.

This article represents Development and Diffusion of Agriculture by showing how in our past years, we could mostly only do substinence agriculture, but today with technology, we can do so much more, with so much less people.

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 11:59 AM

Land use/land cover change: irrigation, desertification, deforestation, wetland destruction, conservation efforts to protect or restore natural land cover, and global impacts-

This article explains how today we have the best technology we have ever created agriculture-wise, but with this, more land has been used. But thanks to precision agriculture, we can use data to determine where we can use the least amount of raw materials needed, thus helping protect more land than before.

 This article demonstrates land use/land cover change: irrigation, desertification, deforestation, wetland destruction, conservation efforts to protect or restore natural land cover, and global impacts by showing how with the technology today and precision farming, we can use less raw materials than ever before, thus helping lessen global impact.

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These maps depict the world's news in real time

These maps depict the world's news in real time | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
An experimental tool to understand the world.

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Sameer Mohamed's curator insight, May 27, 8:49 AM

I think this is an interesting representation to show how the ability to have access to news and internet is the new most important thing to have to get word out. Now if you can speak English and have a computer with internet access you can.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 9:14 AM

This map allows people to understand the flow of news from around the world. We can use it to see where and what is happening and chart it to connect trends for example Syria and France are large because of the recent happenings with terrorists and terror attacks.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:30 AM

Intro

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Utahns, Mainers and Wyomingites: The ultimate guide to what to call people from each state

Utahns, Mainers and Wyomingites: The ultimate guide to what to call people from each state | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it

"For most states, you’re safe adding an –n, and maybe a few other letters, to the state’s name – a la Coloradans, Nebraskans and Californians. For three states, Wyoming, Wisconsin and New Hampshire, the correct method is to add an –ite. For a handful of states in the northeast, the style is to add an 'r' – New Yorker, Vermonter, Mainer, Marylander, Connecticuter and Rhode Islander."


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Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 10:21 PM

This is a really interesting view on a map projection and shows how many possibilities there are for differences.  

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 9:17 AM

This map has data allocating what people are called based on their region. What concerns me is that there is no information depicting what one would be called depending on which city you are from. For example I am from Austin, Texas so you would call me an Austinite but since I am from Texas you would call me a Texan.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:31 AM

Intro-Ch 1 Toponyms

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Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities

Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
Beginning in the 1950s, cities demolished thousands of homes in walkable neighborhoods to make room for freeways.

 

At the time, this was seen as a sign of progress. Not only did planners hope to help people get downtown more quickly, they saw many of the neighborhoods being torn down as blighted and in need of urban renewal.  But tearing down a struggling neighborhood rarely made problems like crime and overcrowding go away. To the contrary, displaced people would move to other neighborhoods, often exacerbating overcrowding problems. Crime rates rose, not fell, in the years after these projects.  By cutting urban neighborhoods in half, planners undermined the blocks on either side of the freeway. The freeways made nearby neighborhoods less walkable. Reduced foot traffic made them less attractive places for stores and restaurants. And that, in turn, made them even less walkable. Those with the means to do so moved to the suburbs, accelerating the neighborhoods' decline.


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MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:34 AM

Urbanization - transportation

 

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 10:16 AM

Industrialization changed not only the physical face of cities, but also the social. Innovations such as highways have caused transportation to become widely easier, allowing people from all different regions of the city to travel easily back and forth from place to place. 

Jill Wallace's curator insight, May 30, 9:41 PM

Maps, Urbanization

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How to Make an Attractive City

We've grown good at making many things in the modern world - but strangely the art of making attractive cities has been lost. Here are some key principles for how to make attractive cities once again.

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Seth Forman's curator insight, May 26, 6:57 PM

Summary: This interesting video talks about principles that should be considered by city planners that could make our life's better and happier.

 

Insight: This video is relevant  to unit 7 because it shows efforts that should be taken by urban planners and how a simple city layout can effect our lives. 

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 27, 1:01 AM

This video gives you an overview of how to make the most attractive city in six ways. It explains the reasons and the wants of a city that potential residents are looking for.

 

This video relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it talks about the orgin, site and situation a city should have for it to be considered attractive to people. A city should be chaotic/ordered, should have visible life, compact, is should have a nice/mysterious orientation, it should not be too big or too small, and it should be local and lively. Today, many cities lack attractiveness because of the intellectual confusion around beauty and the lack of political will. I totally agree with video and the requirement s to have an attrative city. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 4:17 AM

We definitely need more visually pleasing cities, our world is lacking and we are loosing it to like in the video "corporate opportunists".

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Floods might have doomed prehistoric American city

Floods might have doomed prehistoric American city | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
Cahokia settlement's decline began in 1200, around time of major Mississippi River surge.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 7, 2:27 PM

In a flat landscape, what represents power more than a towering mound?  My family loved our excursion to this site and it show so many geographic issues. 


Tagsfluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape, environment depend, environment adapthistorical.

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10 truly absurd features of contemporary geopolitics

10 truly absurd features of contemporary geopolitics | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it

"The U.N. Security Council. What’s Up With That?  And 9 other truly absurd features of contemporary geopolitics."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 8, 11:32 AM

"Some of these absurdities persist because they’ve been around a long time, or because powerful interests defend them vigorously, or because they align with broader social prejudices. Some of them may in fact be defensible, but we should still bring such oddities out into the open air on occasion and ask ourselves if they really make sense."


Tags: political, geopolitics.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 14, 9:13 AM

Absurdity is in the eyes of the beholder ... if the beholder doesn't understand what's behind the actions and behaviors of those who, in this case, are the face of the powers that move the world. The veil of absurdity gets lifted immediately when you take a look at the economic motivations and interconnections, as well as at the fact that politics is the Petri Dish of psychopathy—Look up: Political Ponerology, the subject matter of my new novel: THE GALAPAGOS AGENDA, coming out soon with Suspense Publishing (e-Book) and Story Merchants Books (print).

Kevin Barker's curator insight, June 5, 10:09 AM

What exactly is geopolitics?  Well this is a very interesting article help  understand the concept while having fun with prevailing attitudes, assumptions and structures of the world today.

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Kahoot! as a Review Tool

Kahoot! as a Review Tool | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
Kahoot! is a classroom response system which creates an engaging learning space, through a game-based digital pedagogy. Kahoot! is an easy-to-use blended learning platform which works on any device, making the classroom interactive, encouraging both educators and learners to ask great questions.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 11, 3:36 PM

Here are resources to join the 166,000 students preparing to take the AP Human Geography Exam this Friday:

  • Above is the link to a Kahoot! APHG review...a good way to gamify the review process.  
  • There is also this APHG Kahoot! interactive quiz--in this one the students match a development clue to a regional map.
  • This Prezi is a systemic, unit-by-unit review of major ideas. 


Tags: APHG.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 9:47 AM

test review

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Whatever happened to Psy and K-pop’s bid to conquer the world?

Whatever happened to Psy and K-pop’s bid to conquer the world? | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it

"K-pop sensation Psy was everywhere once but little has been heard since. What happened to him?  Having earned an estimated $55m (£36m) from his work in the West, Psy is now racking up similar amounts from the lucrative Chinese market, where his collaboration with world-class pianist Lang Lang is currently producing a run of consecutive number ones. Psy's decision to focus on the Asian music market may be an indication of where the entertainment industry turns over the highest profits for musicians."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 4, 6:17 PM

In 2012, we were analyzing the cultural geography of a viral sensation, that seemed to fizzle out so we dismissed it as a one-hit wonder.  So often we assume that being culturally and economically viable in the West is of greatest importance, but truly savvy brands aren't sleeping on East Asian markets.  This "one-hit wonder" in the West strategically moved on to even larger markets. 


Tags: popular culture, diffusion, globalization, culture, music

Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 19, 10:21 AM

Pop culture - after Gangnam Style

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22+ International Borders Around The World

22+ International Borders Around The World | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
History (and sometimes, unfortunately, current events) shows us just how easily national borders can change, but we still like to think that they are permanent fixtures. These photos of different national borders around the world show you how both friendly and hostile nations like to fence off their turf.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 9:38 AM

Unit 4

Level343's curator insight, June 1, 3:00 PM

Now that's cool!!

Dwane Burke's curator insight, June 3, 6:16 PM

What do these say about the world?

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Why China's ethnic minorities are being left out of the economic boom

Facing ethnic discrimination, China's Uighurs and Tibetans have fallen behind as the rest of the country surges ahead

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 20, 9:41 AM

This video from the Economist touches on many of the same cultural/political issues as I did in my recent article for the National Geographic Education Blog (except, obviously, this video provides a greater economic emphasis).  Ethnic tensions are always simmering tensions in the China's westernmost province and Tibet remains culturally resistant to the program set forth by the People's Republic of China.  


TagsCentral Asia, culture, economic, China, East Asia.

Jessica Ruddy's curator insight, June 3, 2:15 PM

What does this mean for these minorities....will they be phased out of existence?  What cultural impact is there?

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'Love locks' to be removed from Paris bridge

'Love locks' to be removed from Paris bridge | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it

"The city of Paris will start removing padlocks from the Pont des Arts on Monday, effectively ending the tourist tradition of attaching 'love locks' to the bridge. For years, visitors have been attaching locks with sentimental messages to the bridge in symbolic acts of affection. Some further seal the deal by throwing keys into the Seine River below.  It was considered charming at first, but the thrill wore off as sections of fencing on the Pont des Arts crumbled under the locks' weight. The bridge carries more than 700,000 locks with an estimated combined weight roughly the same as 20 elephants."


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Leslie G Perry's curator insight, June 2, 8:32 AM

I LOVE Seth Dixon's insight on this and how it figures in with Design Technology. What mark do we leave and why? What are the unintended consequences of leaving out mark?

 

Seth Dixon's insight:

Graffiti, tombstones, love locks, monuments...each of these are manifestations of people's desire to have some tangible impact on the landscape.  Something that manifests a connection to place in a profoundly personal way. 

 

Questions to Ponder: Why do people want leave a mark on places that are meaningful to them?  When do you think that they that these markers are appropriate or inappropriate?  Do we have more of a 'right' to mark some places than others? Why do many oppose these personal marks on the landscape?

Linda Denty's curator insight, June 4, 8:32 PM

Great discussion point for your classes!  As Seth Dixon says why do people choose to leave a mark on certain places and is this appropriate?  Could people be doing something else that doesn't have such a deleterious effect on it's environment?  

CMuddGeo's curator insight, June 7, 6:29 PM

This is understandable but very sad...

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HDI over time in Central America

HDI over time in Central America | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it

"Explore public data through Google's visualization tools." 


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Savannah Rains's curator insight, May 27, 1:41 AM

This HDI model is showing rankings of Central America. The HDI combines stats like life expectancy, education, and per capita income and compares countries to one another. This is an interesting graph to observe ans study because people should be able to have the knowledge of their country compared to others and where places lie in comparison to their neighboring countries. 

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:28 AM

Population Unit

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 1:05 PM

Human Development Index-

This article explains how more and more countries in Central America are becoming more developed and have higher HDI. This helps create better views on Central America, thus giving it better chances via trade with other countries.

 

This article demonstrates the idea of HDI by showing the actual HDI's in Central America, and how most countries are increasing overall.

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World's largest hotel coming to Mecca

World's largest hotel coming to Mecca | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
Abraj Kudai, a complex in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, is set to become the world's largest hotel by room count when it opens in 2017.

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Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 3:20 AM

Hmm it seems hot deserts hold the greatest things. Las Vegas will soon no longer have the largest hotel, with over 6000 rooms. I wonder how this will play out during the next hajj. Will the people love Abraj Kudai or hate it because of its expensiveness?

Jill Wallace's curator insight, May 30, 9:40 PM

Religion

Ambre Cooper's curator insight, June 26, 12:25 PM

beautiful architecture in Saudi Arabia

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3 easy ways to tell if a viral photo is bogus

3 easy ways to tell if a viral photo is bogus | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it

"Many people posting it wrote that the photo was taken during the recent Nepal earthquakes, and that it depicts 'a brother protecting his sister.' Pretty heartwarming, right? It’s the exact sort of thing your aunt would share on Facebook. A perfectly clear, resonant message about survival and empathy and inequality, all that good stuff.  There’s only one problem: That picture is fake."


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 27, 10:43 AM

course resource, life resource :)

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 27, 1:05 PM

This picture supposedly taken in Nepal of a brother protecting his younger sister due to recent earthquakes is, in fact, false. These kinds of photos portraying helpless people in foreign countries are often created to increase Instagram likes and retweets on twitter. Some times are real photos of someone or something going through tragedy, but often they are not.    

Wendy Zaruba's curator insight, June 2, 9:21 AM

This is a GREAT Tip for checking out all those sad stories you see on Facebook and Twitter.  Once again Thank You Google!!

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Map Projections

This video describes what map projections are, and how the Earth can be represented using map projections within a GIS.

 

Tags: Mapping, video, map projections, cartography.


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Campbell Ingraham's curator insight, May 25, 3:14 PM

This video relates to Use of geospatial technologies, such as GIS, remote sensing, global positioning systems (GPS), and online maps. It tells about how the world is a 3D shape, but we view it as 2D, which leads to distortions in world size. The use of GIS allows for the world to be projected onto any shape such as a cone, rectangle, prism, or pyramid. And this leads to the different map projections. 

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:31 AM

Ch 1 Map Projections

Jill Wallace's curator insight, May 30, 9:41 PM

Maps

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Historian Says Don't 'Sanitize' How Our Government Created Ghettos

Historian Says Don't 'Sanitize' How Our Government Created Ghettos | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it

"We have a myth today that the ghettos in metropolitan areas around the country are what the Supreme Court calls 'de-facto' — just the accident of the fact that people have not enough income to move into middle class neighborhoods or because real estate agents steered black and white families to different neighborhoods or because there was white flight.  It was not the unintended effect of benign policies, it was an explicit, racially purposeful policy that was pursued at all levels of government, and that's the reason we have these ghettos today and we are reaping the fruits of those policies."

 

Tags: economic, race, racism, historical, neighborhood, podcast, urban, place, poverty, socioeconomic.


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Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 3:57 PM

Ghettos were created because of many factors; one of these being in the 20th century real estate agents "blockbusting" basically meaning scaring white folks into thinking their neighborhood was becoming a slum causing them to quickly sell their house to real estate agents for an extremely low price and then turning around to sell the same house to black folks for much more because of limited homes for them to live in.

The ethnic neighborhoods and ghettos that still exist now are the result of people not having enough income to move to middle class neighborhoods and because real estate agents steered black and white families apart. 

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Map of Most Common Race

Map of Most Common Race | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it

"The map above shows the most prevalent race in each county, based on data from the 2013 American Community Survey 5-year estimates. Select and deselect to make various comparisons."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, census, ethnicity, race.


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Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 27, 12:17 AM

This census map shows the diversity of America, but also largely shows how entire counties, such as those around Baltimore and St. Louis can be seemingly segregated between races, though all persons are American. This leads to bizarre nationalism and continued ethnic and racial divides in society through the uneven distribution of race and ethnicity in the US.

Sameer Mohamed's curator insight, May 27, 9:00 AM

I think it is interesting to think about the reasons where certain ethnic groups live. It is sad but also interesting to see that because of the slavery in the south, black americans make a large if not  dominant percentage of the majority  of the south. It is also interesting to see where Asian Americans living where they do because it is a newer migration pattern. This is reflected in the areas that Asians settle because of how they got to their homes.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:34 AM

Culture-race

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Christianity faces sharp decline as Americans are becoming even less affiliated with religion

Christianity faces sharp decline as Americans are becoming even less affiliated with religion | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
There are more religiously unaffiliated Americans than Catholic Americans or mainline Protestant Americans.

 

Christianity is on the decline in America, not just among younger generations or in certain regions of the country but across race, gender, education and geographic barriers. The percentage of adults who describe themselves as Christians dropped by nearly eight percentage points in just seven years to about 71 percent, according to a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center.

 

Tags: religion, culture, Christianity, USA.


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Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 27, 12:23 AM

As scientific knowledge and material goods continue to rise in abundance for many Americans, the need for religion and otherworldly salvation is declining, which can be found in recent census surveys of religion and affiliation, which sees many Americans becoming unaffiliated with religion in favor of a more secular lifestyle.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 4:23 AM

It is a shame that millennials are declining religion more. Religion is one of the bases of culture. If you take away a base from a house it crumbles. The more we deny our religion, values, and culture in general the more we will become plain, and no longer culturally diverse.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:35 AM

Religion-Christianity in USA

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Why Earthquakes Are Devastating Nepal

Why Earthquakes Are Devastating Nepal | Esaili's Geography | Scoop.it
The May 12 7.3 magnitude aftershock was one of many that followed the April 25 earthquake that shook Nepal. Why is this part of the world such a hotbed of tectonic activity?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 13, 8:11 AM

This video is in a series by National Geographic designed to show the geography behind the current events--especially geared towards understanding the physical geography.  Check out more videos in the '101 videos' series here.   

 

Tags physicalNational Geographic, tectonics, disasters, video.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 9:44 AM

Summer reading, tectonic plates