ES1 HSIE 'Meeting Needs'; Science 'Staying Alive'.
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Rumble, Grumble, Gurgle, Roar | EconEdLink

Rumble, Grumble, Gurgle, Roar | EconEdLink | ES1 HSIE 'Meeting Needs'; Science 'Staying Alive'. | Scoop.it
This free lesson by EconEdLink covers Economic Wants, Economics, Family/Consumer Science, Scarcity
Casey Lee Rich's insight:

Animation followed my comprehension questions - everybody has wants, looking specifically at food. Lesson presented as discussion of wants but looks at food, could adapt.

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What Animals Need in Order to Survive

What Animals Need in Order to Survive | ES1 HSIE 'Meeting Needs'; Science 'Staying Alive'. | Scoop.it
This SmartBoard activity is about what animals need in order to survive.
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Animals needs - science "staying alive"

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Basic needs and children's rights | Global Education

Basic needs and children's rights | Global Education | ES1 HSIE 'Meeting Needs'; Science 'Staying Alive'. | Scoop.it
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Global perspective on needs - cultural differences, meeting needs in the face of poverty.

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Rescooped by Casey Lee Rich from Early Stage 1 HSIE: "people who met their needs in the past"
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Smartboard Resource: Needs and Wants

Smartboard Resource: Needs and Wants | ES1 HSIE 'Meeting Needs'; Science 'Staying Alive'. | Scoop.it
Students can identify the differences between wants and needs.

Via Patrick Madden
Casey Lee Rich's insight:

Notebook file: introduction to concept of needs vs wants, includes prompting questions, brainstorming, interactive activities, song (to tune of Old MacDonald)

List of similar resources: http://exchange.smarttech.com/search.html?q=wants+and+needs&region=en_AU&region=en_US

(Membership required - free)

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Patrick Madden's curator insight, April 21, 2013 3:15 AM

This website, which enables teachers to download an interactive Smartboard resource, could be used by Kindergarten teachers to assist students in understanding the differences between needs and wants. This resource also provides students with an opportunity to develop critical inquiry and information organisation skills (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011; McInerney & McInerney, 2010) as the Smartboard file contains brainstorming and categorisation games and activities. As this resource is sixteen slides in length it would be wise for teachers to use this file over the course of three lessons to ensure that students have a clear understanding of the differences between needs and wants. For example, the first lesson could focus on students’ prior understandings of what needs and wants are (slides 1-3); the second lesson could explore examples of needs in students’ daily lives (slides 4-10); and the final lesson could develop students’ critical thinking skills (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011) as they learn to categorise items as either needs or wants (slides 11-15). Following this three-part lesson series the teacher should assess whether students understand the differences between needs and wants by leading a whole-class activity in which students create a chronological, pictorial timetable of their school day. Events would include waking up, eating breakfast, brushing teeth, attending school, eating recess and lunch, playing during break times, playing after school, eating dinner and going to bed. Following this the teacher could name each activity recorded on the timetable and ask the class to raise their hands if they think the activity is a need or a want. Such an assessment strategy would enable students to share their ideas with their peers if there was disagreement (McInerney & McInerney, 2010). Teachers could also facilitate an individual assessment activity by having students draw their most important need and their favourite want and write a sentence about each.

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Compare clothing over time

Compare and contrast clothing today with clothing popular in past eras. Identify similarities and differences. Generate discussion around needs vs wants when it comes to clothing (something that can cross both categories). Can also look at food and shelter of the past.

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Rescooped by Casey Lee Rich from Early Stage 1 HSIE: "people who met their needs in the past"
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People Who Help us Meet our Needs


Via Patrick Madden
Casey Lee Rich's insight:

Activity ideas: firefighters, police, etc.

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Patrick Madden's curator insight, April 21, 2013 3:02 AM

This website provides Kindergarten teachers with inspiration for a series of lessons about how people in the community help to meet the needs of others. The author of the website, Jo Bertrand, suggests that teachers select one occupation per lesson and use quality children’s literature and puppetry to show students how particular social systems and structures assist them in meeting their needs. The inclusion of quality children’s literature (Gibson & Ewing, 2011) and puppetry (Ewing & Simons, 2010) in primary school classrooms has been shown to improve students’ literacy and oral communication skills. Examples of occupations that could be explored over the course of a one or two week period include medicine, dentistry, nursing, teaching, policing and fire fighting. To assess that the class understands that various people in the community have helped them to meet their needs in the past (New South Wales Board of Studies, 2007) students could complete a worksheet in which they must match a picture of a problem, for example a house on fire, with a picture of a person or organisation who could help them, in this case a fire fighter. Additionally, educators should seek to establish meaningful relationships with local service providers and community organisations so that it is possible to have guest speakers visit the class to talk about how their occupational field helps others meet their basic needs. For example, a nurse may visit the classroom and talk to students about the important role nurses play in hospitals.

Rescooped by Casey Lee Rich from Early Stage 1 HSIE: "people who met their needs in the past"
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Exploring Needs and Wants Through Literacy Activities


Via Patrick Madden
Casey Lee Rich's insight:

Sorting objects into different hula hoops for needs vs wants. Drawing/writing our needs.

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Patrick Madden's curator insight, April 21, 2013 3:07 AM

This blog, which outlines a number of learning activities appropriate to Kindergarten students studying a unit of work on needs and wants, is a fantastic resource for teachers. Mrs Luciani, the blog’s author, shows how she used categorisation and literacy exercises to assess whether her students were able to identify needs and wants in their own lives. As outlined by McInerney and McInerney (2010), activities that seek to show students how ‘formal’ knowledge learnt in the classroom is relevant to their daily lives are likely to encourage students to develop positive associations with school and inspire intrinsic motivation when completing future tasks. Instead of using Mrs Luciani’s learning activities as the foundation for a HSIE lesson, however, it would be wise for teachers to consider how they could integrate her games and activities with other key learning areas to develop students’ early literacy skills (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011). For example, during the class’ ‘show and tell’ segment students could be asked to bring an object that represents a need and an object that represents a want. During their presentation students could explain, with assistance from the teacher if necessary, why the objects they have selected meet the criteria of a need and want respectively. The traditional understanding of ‘show and tell’ could be further adapted so that students’ objects are used as the primary teaching resource in a literacy lesson that focuses on oral language development (Mills, 1996). Here, the presenter could place one of their objects in a cardboard box. The presenter must use descriptive language, following prompts from the teacher if necessary, to describe their object to the class without revealing what the object is. They could discuss the shape or colour of the object, when they use the object or where the object is usually found. Following this description the class must guess what object is inside the box and then identify whether the object represents a need or want. Mills (1996) believes that activities such as this are essential to early literacy development as they familiarise students with descriptive language and the conventions of formal oral communication.