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Rescooped by mymalvern from Landscape Urbanism
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Fresh Kills Park's proposal by Field Operations

"Fresh Kills, which operated from 1948 until it closed initially in 2001, is the world’s largest landfill. Consisting of more than 2,000 acres on the western edge of Staten Island, it contains within its boundaries intact tidal wetlands and significant wildlife habitats. Because of its size and diverse topography, the site lends itself to both recreational and scenic uses. We hope that Fresh Kills Park, with its unprecedented size, metropolitan context, and challenging but rich opportunities for end-use development, will serve as a model for land reclamation projects around the world. [...] Only 45% of Fresh Kills’ four square miles is actually landfill; the other 55% is made up of wetland, creeks and tidal flats, open meadows and woodland. Paradoxically, the landfill operations during the past 50 years have afforded a unique opportunity for the preservation of this huge land reserve from development sprawl and fragmentation. Now that the landfill is approaching fi nal capping of the mounds, the beauty and potential of the area are striking. The Draft Master Plan is the first step in beginning the process of transformation that will open the site for new public uses."

 

Further information about the competition and the rest of the proposals here: http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/html/fkl/fkl2_1.shtml


Via Ignacio López Busón
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Rescooped by mymalvern from Landscape Urbanism
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"A city is not a tree" by Christopher Alexander (pdf)

"At a time of increasing concern over the adequacy of design methods, "A City is not a Tree" broke open and reoriented the debate. It also represented a fundamental change in Christopher Alexander's thinking. While retaining the mathematical foundation underlying his Notes on the Synthesis of Form, "A City is not a Tree" takes it in a very different direction. Where the one seeks a crystalline logic to arrive at the notion of "fitness" between form and programme, the other points to a fundamental ambiguity and overlap in the relation of form to its uses. The one is an extreme extension of Modernist rationalism, the other a reaction against it." Charles Jencks and Karl Kropf

 

"The tree of my title is not a green tree with leaves. It is the name of an abstract structure. I shall contrast it with another, more complex abstract structure called a semi-lattice. The city is a semi-lattice, but it is not a tree. In order to relate these abstract structures to the nature of the city, I must first make a simple distinction..." Christopher Alexander (1965)


Via Ignacio López Busón
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Landscape MASLA ETH Zurich's curator insight, January 26, 2013 9:02 AM

Great, thanks for sharing the pdf with us - the texts of Christopher Alexander are always very inspiring!