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Rescooped by Nita Hunter from Archaeology Articles and Books
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Early Neolithic Water Wells Reveal the World's Oldest Wood Architecture

Early Neolithic Water Wells Reveal the World's Oldest Wood Architecture | Educational Leadership | Scoop.it

The European Neolithization ~6000−4000 BC represents a pivotal change in human history when farming spread and the mobile style of life of the hunter-foragers was superseded by the agrarian culture.

Permanent settlement structures and agricultural production systems required fundamental innovations in technology, subsistence, and resource utilization. Motivation, course, and timing of this transformation, however, remain debatable.

 

Here we present annually resolved and absolutely dated dendroarchaeological information from four wooden water wells of the early Neolithic period that were excavated in Eastern Germany. A total of 151 oak timbers preserved in a waterlogged environment were dated between 5469 and 5098 BC and reveal unexpectedly refined carpentry skills.

 

The recently discovered water wells enable for the first time a detailed insight into the earliest wood architecture and display the technological capabilities of humans ~7000 years ago. The timbered well constructions made of old oak trees feature an unopened tree-ring archive from which annually resolved and absolutely dated environmental data can be culled.

 

Our results question the principle of continuous evolutionary development in prehistoric technology, and contradict the common belief that metal was necessary for complex timber constructions. Early Neolithic craftsmanship now suggests that the first farmers were also the first carpenters.

 

Citation: Tegel W, Elburg R, Hakelberg D, Stäuble H, Büntgen U (2012) Early Neolithic Water Wells Reveal the World's Oldest Wood Architecture. PLoS ONE 7(12): e51374. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0051374


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David Connolly's curator insight, January 4, 2013 4:16 AM

Important article from PLOSone regarding the ability of Neolithic societies could have sophisticated carpentry without metal tools

Sarah Kerr's curator insight, November 7, 2013 1:02 AM

This scoop is about how some wooden water wells that were excavated in Eastern Germany give insight on to what the earliest wood was used for the wells. 

Rescooped by Nita Hunter from Hamurabi's Law Code
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Clues To Lost Prehistoric Code Discovered

Clues To Lost Prehistoric Code Discovered | Educational Leadership | Scoop.it
Researchers studying clay balls from Mesopotamia have discovered clues to a lost code that was used for record-keeping about 200 years before writing was invented.

Via Kenny Nguyen
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Kenny Nguyen's curator insight, October 11, 2013 1:50 PM

It may be a lost part of the hamurabi code we have never gotten

 

Cindy Garcia's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:28 AM

In this webpage The HuffingtonPost, reseachers claim findings of a record-keeping system made in the Neolithic period from Clay Balls. These artifacts were found in Mesopotamia. They represent a Worlds "very first data storage systems" scientists know of. ( Owens Jarus, pg 1-2)

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Curation as Digital Literacy Practice

Curation as Digital Literacy Practice | Educational Leadership | Scoop.it
I have been writing my PhD so haven't updated this blog for a while. Thesis writing is taking up a lot of my mental space as I get the ideas, storyline and contentions to 'coalesce' and cohere in a...
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A nice explanation of curating!
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Curation as Digital Literacy Practice

Curation as Digital Literacy Practice | Educational Leadership | Scoop.it
I have been writing my PhD so haven't updated this blog for a while. Thesis writing is taking up a lot of my mental space as I get the ideas, storyline and contentions to 'coalesce' and cohere in a...
Nita Hunter's insight:
A good explanation of curating!
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Los Angeles: Court Rules that Public Has No Right to Know Job Ratings of Individual Teachers

Los Angeles: Court Rules that Public Has No Right to Know Job Ratings of Individual Teachers | Educational Leadership | Scoop.it
Remember that the Los Angeles Times released the value-added ratings (made up by their own consultant) with the names of teachers in 2010?   Recently, the paper sued to get the ratings for thr...
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Radio Days revisited: Actor to produce old-time radio-drama at Chief Theater - Bemidji Pioneer

Radio Days revisited: Actor to produce old-time radio-drama at Chief Theater - Bemidji Pioneer | Educational Leadership | Scoop.it
Bemidji Pioneer
Radio Days revisited: Actor to produce old-time radio-drama at Chief Theater
Bemidji Pioneer
Webster began researching the old radio dramas and discovered those mysteries written by Carlton E.
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Rescooped by Nita Hunter from Archaeology Articles and Books
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PLoS ONE: Squaring the Circle. Social and Environmental Implications of Pre-Pottery Neolithic Building Technology at Tell Qarassa (South Syria)

PLoS ONE: Squaring the Circle. Social and Environmental Implications of Pre-Pottery Neolithic Building Technology at Tell Qarassa (South Syria) | Educational Leadership | Scoop.it

We present the results of the microstratigraphic, phytolith and wood charcoal study of the remains of a 10.5 ka roof. The roof is part of a building excavated at Tell Qarassa (South Syria), assigned to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B period (PPNB). The Pre-Pottery Neolithic (PPN) period in the Levant coincides with the emergence of farming. This fundamental change in subsistence strategy implied the shift from mobile to settled aggregated life, and from tents and huts to hard buildings. As settled life spread across the Levant, a generalised transition from round to square buildings occurred, that is a trademark of the PPNB period.

 

The study of these buildings is fundamental for the understanding of the ever-stronger reciprocal socio-ecological relationship humans developed with the local environment since the introduction of sedentism and domestication. Descriptions of buildings in PPN archaeological contexts are usually restricted to the macroscopic observation of wooden elements (posts and beams) and mineral components (daub, plaster and stone elements). Reconstructions of microscopic and organic components are frequently based on ethnographic analogy.

 

The direct study of macroscopic and microscopic, organic and mineral, building components performed at Tell Qarassa provides new insights on building conception, maintenance, use and destruction. These elements reflect new emerging paradigms in the relationship between Neolithic societies and the environment. A square building was possibly covered here with a radial roof, providing a glance into a topologic shift in the conception and understanding of volumes, from round-based to square-based geometries. Macroscopic and microscopic roof components indicate buildings were conceived for year-round residence rather than seasonal mobility. This implied performing maintenance and restoration of partially damaged buildings, as well as their adaptation to seasonal variability.


Via David Connolly
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Perfect for common core,  claims evidence 

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Lessons for Today From 5 Ancient Civilizations

Lessons for Today From 5 Ancient Civilizations | Educational Leadership | Scoop.it

This April, National Geographic explorers and other experts in five of the world's oldest civilizations will gather in Guatemala to discuss how the past can be a window to the future.

At least five distinct times in world history, human beings created a unique writing system that allowed them to organize their thoughts and record and transmit information like never before: the Egyptians, Mesopotamians, Chinese, People of the Indus Valley, and the Maya. They each spread to inspire more written systems (for example the Latin alphabet we use comes from Phonecian, which stems ultimately from Egyptian).


Via David Connolly, Kenny Nguyen
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joseph mora's curator insight, October 22, 2013 12:15 AM

talks about Mesopotamians, Egyptians, Chinese, People of the Indus Valley, and the Mayans and some importance in which they impacted.

joseph mora's curator insight, November 14, 2013 11:26 PM

what we could learn from ancient civilizations

Chris Tat's curator insight, January 17, 2014 10:15 PM

I thought this article was intriguing because our blog for this week was to compare ancient civilization to modern day civilization.  I am awe stricken that even in ancient times, human beings created a unique writing system.  It is crazy to think that the tradition of writing has been passed down from generation to generation for years.

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Curation as Digital Literacy Practice

Curation as Digital Literacy Practice | Educational Leadership | Scoop.it
“ I have been writing my PhD so haven't updated this blog for a while. Thesis writing is taking up a lot of my mental space as I get the ideas, storyline and contentions to 'coalesce' and cohere in a...”
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Curation explained nicely!
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Rescooped by Nita Hunter from social studies education
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Common Core Illinois

Common Core Illinois | Educational Leadership | Scoop.it
Common Core Illinois provides information and resources about the Common Core State Standards to the parents and educators of Illinois.

Via Mel Riddile, Nita Hunter
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Old Time Radio appeals to actors with limited hours - Your Houston News

Old Time Radio appeals to actors with limited hours
Your Houston News
This season the Players plan old-time radio shows to be broadcast worldwide each month on Lone Star Internet Radio that Dick Schlissler helms in Conroe.
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