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Psychologists link emotion to vividness of perception and creation of vivid memories

Psychologists link emotion to vividness of perception and creation of vivid memories | Human errors | Scoop.it

Have you ever wondered why you can remember things from long ago as if they happened yesterday, yet sometimes can't recall what you ate for dinner last night? According to a new study led by psychologists at the University of Toronto, it's because how much something means to you actually influences how you see it as well as how vividly you can recall it later.

 

"We've discovered that we see things that are emotionally arousing with greater clarity than those that are more mundane," says Rebecca Todd, a postdoctoral fellow in U of T's Department of Psychology and lead author of the study published recently in the Journal of Neuroscience. "Whether they're positive -- for example, a first kiss, the birth of a child, winning an award -- or negative, such as traumatic events, breakups, or a painful and humiliating childhood moment that we all carry with us, the effect is the same."

"What's more, we found that how vividly we perceive something in the first place predicts how vividly we will remember it later on," says Todd. "We call this 'emotionally enhanced vividness' and it is like the flash of a flashbub that illuminates an event as it's captured for memory."

 

By studying brain activity, Todd, psychology professor Adam Anderson and other colleagues at U of T, along with researchers at the University of Manchester and the University of California, San Diego found that the part of the brain responsible for tagging the emotional or motivational importance of things according to one's own past experience -- the amygdala -- is more active when looking at images that are rated as vivid. This increased activation in turn influences activity in both the visual cortex, enhancing activity linked to seeing objects, and in the posterior insula, a region that integrates sensations from the body.


Via Ashish Umre, Moin Rahman
John Vollenbroek's insight:

Keep the stories in your organization alive !

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Do your genes determine your entire life? - The Guardian

Do your genes determine your entire life? - The Guardian | Human errors | Scoop.it
The long read: Some scientists claim that new discoveries have proved free will is an illusion. Nonsense, says Julian Baggini
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Rescooped by John Vollenbroek from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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Screens May Be Terrible for You, and Now We Know Why | WIRED

Screens May Be Terrible for You, and Now We Know Why | WIRED | Human errors | Scoop.it
For more than 3 billion years, the cyclical light of sun, moon, and stars governed life on Earth. Then along came electric light. Our bodies and brains may not have been ready.

Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
John Vollenbroek's insight:

 It’s not just the sleep-wake cycle

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Innovation Excellence | 15 Surprising Discoveries About Learning

Innovation Excellence | 15 Surprising Discoveries About Learning | Human errors | Scoop.it
What are some of the most encouraging known facts about learning? From taking a walk to learning a new language, there are countless things we can do to improve the way we learn.

Via Charles Tiayon
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Rachid Mouzouni's curator insight, March 14, 6:12 PM

Interesting article! 

Kathleen Kampa Vilina's curator insight, March 24, 10:14 PM

Lots of great strategies for boosting learning in this article!  Wow!  

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The way pharmacists work will not change

The way pharmacists work will not change | Human errors | Scoop.it
I wish to comment on Brian Curwain’s letter on the government’s proposal to decriminalise dispensing errors (The Pharmaceutical Journal 2015;294:211). I am not convinced that the decriminalisation of dispensing ...
John Vollenbroek's insight:

Next week I have a workshop in a pharmacy

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Nuclear plant operations: unlocking the human factor - Power Technology

Nuclear plant operations: unlocking the human factor - Power Technology | Human errors | Scoop.it
At a time when nuclear energy could be playing a significantly larger role in decarbonising the world's energy mix, the nuclear industry finds itself with something of an image problem.Beyond its immediate and ongoing consequences for the...
John Vollenbroek's insight:

It's a pity that we have to wait a couple of years

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Cybercrime fighters target human error - Nature.com

Cybercrime fighters target human error - Nature.com | Human errors | Scoop.it
Researchers aim to cut passwords and people out of the data-safety equation.
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Cloud Infographic – Human Error And Data Breaches - CloudTweaks News

Cloud Infographic – Human Error And Data Breaches - CloudTweaks News | Human errors | Scoop.it
Data Breaches - We can expect an increase in fines handed out in 2015 as Human Error and Data Breaches continue to rise with unfortunately no
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Rescooped by John Vollenbroek from Learning Technology News
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Learning languages is a workout for brains, both young and old | Penn State University

Learning languages is a workout for brains, both young and old | Penn State University | Human errors | Scoop.it
Such changes, Li and colleagues suggested while reviewing a number of related studies, are consistent with anatomical changes that can occur in the brain as a result of learning a second language, no matter the age of the learner, as they reported in a recent issue of Cortex.

Via Nik Peachey
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Lisa Gorman's curator insight, February 9, 11:39 PM

I really love languages but I have only ever really mastered one.  Here's proof that one of my future goals really needs to be to decide and commit to Spanish, French or Indonesian... 

Helen Teague's curator insight, February 13, 7:00 PM

very useful article and I like the multigenerational emphasis

Pamela Hills's curator insight, February 22, 8:28 AM

There are parts of our brain laying dormant. Wake them up and learn a language . You are never to young or old to learn.

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35 Psychological Tricks To Help You Learn Better - InformED

35 Psychological Tricks To Help You Learn Better - InformED | Human errors | Scoop.it
Have you ever considered letting your students listen to hardcore punk while they take their mid-term exam? Decided to do away with Power Point presentat
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Human Errors Plague Financial Reporting - Financial Executives International Daily

Human Errors Plague Financial Reporting - Financial Executives International Daily | Human errors | Scoop.it
Technology plays a critical role in improving tax, accounting and financial reporting, but even the most sophisticated tools remain vulnerable to good old human error.
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What Research Tells Us About Making Accurate Predictions - blogs.hbr.org (blog)

What Research Tells Us About Making Accurate Predictions - blogs.hbr.org (blog) | Human errors | Scoop.it
It’s not hopeless after all.
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The greatest mistranslations ever

The greatest mistranslations ever | Human errors | Scoop.it
After Google Translate’s latest update, BBC Culture finds history’s biggest language mistakes – including a US president stating ‘I desire the Poles carnally’.

Via Charles Tiayon
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The tech helping investors ignore their emotions - BBC News

The tech helping investors ignore their emotions - BBC News | Human errors | Scoop.it
Investors are only human - but what if you could take emotion out of the equation, making people as rational as computers? There might be an app for that.
John Vollenbroek's insight:

robo-investors

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Human Error: Living With the Weakest Link - Xconomy

Human Error: Living With the Weakest Link - Xconomy | Human errors | Scoop.it
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." - Walt Kelly's Pogo Computer security breaches have become so common as to seem like a force of nature we can’t stop
John Vollenbroek's insight:

an overall system is often safer if we give users fewer warnings, not more.

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Rescooped by John Vollenbroek from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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Study Reveals Fascinating Possibilities for Video Gaming and Brain Development and Repair

Study Reveals Fascinating Possibilities for Video Gaming and Brain Development and Repair | Human errors | Scoop.it
Early Brain Development and Gaming: A New Study on Neurogenesis and Brain Connectivity Could a recent study by neuroscientist Simone Kühn reveal new ways of

Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Justin Tu's curator insight, March 25, 10:56 AM

Sam, B., 2015, 'Study Reveals Fascinating Possibilities for Video Gaming and Brain Development and Repair', Article of Cost Cutters Education Supplies. 

Sam reviews how video games are evolving within modern technology allowing it to help educate children in and out of educational establishments. The author is particularly interested in learning methods; he reviews and writes about a recent study by neuroscientist Simone Kiihn, revealing methods of stimulating early brain development, which can be activated by video games. Their research focuses on brain, neurogenesis and how video games benefit the brain. The article is useful as Sam reveals the numerous reasons on how video games can benefit a child's early development. The limitation of the article is that there is restricted information on how video games can become even more beneficial in the future for people, additionally further research by Simone will demonstrate that the use of video games could be used as a therapy tool which can tackle down various mental disorders. This article will be useful as it demonstrates the possibilities of video games being able to help studies learn how to cure mental illnesses.

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United Airlines sends stern memo to pilots outlining flight errors

United Airlines sends stern memo to pilots outlining flight errors | Human errors | Scoop.it
Several serious incidents in the cockpit triggered a written warning from United Airlines to it pilots.
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Rescooped by John Vollenbroek from Papers
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Human-level control through deep reinforcement learning

For an artificial agent to be considered truly intelligent it needs to excel at a variety of tasks considered challenging for humans. To date, it has only been possible to create individual algorithms able to master a single discipline — for example, IBM's Deep Blue beat the human world champion at chess but was not able to do anything else. Now a team working at Google's DeepMind subsidiary has developed an artificial agent — dubbed a deep Q-network — that learns to play 49 classic Atari 2600 'arcade' games directly from sensory experience, achieving performance on a par with that of an expert human player. By combining reinforcement learning (selecting actions that maximize reward — in this case the game score) with deep learning (multilayered feature extraction from high-dimensional data — in this case the pixels), the game-playing agent takes artificial intelligence a step nearer the goal of systems capable of learning a diversity of challenging tasks from scratch.

 

Human-level control through deep reinforcement learning
• Volodymyr Mnih, Koray Kavukcuoglu, David Silver, Andrei A. Rusu, Joel Veness, Marc G. Bellemare, Alex Graves, Martin Riedmiller, Andreas K. Fidjeland, Georg Ostrovski, Stig Petersen, Charles Beattie, Amir Sadik, Ioannis Antonoglou, Helen King, Dharshan Kumaran, Daan Wierstra, Shane Legg & Demis Hassabis

Nature 518, 529–533 (26 February 2015)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature14236 ;


Via Complexity Digest
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impressive

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No humans required: heuristic automation and the IT system which runs itself

No humans required: heuristic automation and the IT system which runs itself | Human errors | Scoop.it
Intelligent automation is the future of IT management
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Fatigue: the most critical accident risk in oil and gas construction

Fatigue: the most critical accident risk in oil and gas construction
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How Medtech Companies Can Reduce Costs And Increase Revenue Through ... - Med Device Online (press release)

How Medtech Companies Can Reduce Costs And Increase Revenue Through ... - Med Device Online (press release) | Human errors | Scoop.it
Healthcare is a more dangerous industry than most people realize. People are often surprised when they hear that medical error is the third leading...
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Network downtimes are more harmful than previously thought | ITProPortal.com

Network downtimes are more harmful than previously thought | ITProPortal.com | Human errors | Scoop.it
It seems network outages cost companies much more than previously thought, according to a study conducted on behalf of supplier Avaya.
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Rescooped by John Vollenbroek from Social Foraging
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Brain Network Adaptability across Task States

Brain Network Adaptability across Task States | Human errors | Scoop.it
Author Summary The human brain is a complex system in which the interactions of billions of neurons give rise to a fascinating range of behaviors.

Via Ashish Umre
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