Erba Volant - App...
Follow
Find
6.3K views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Meristemi from Emerging Research in Plant Cell Biology
onto Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science
Scoop.it!

Evolution of Lemon Flavor

Evolution of Lemon Flavor | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
A batch of lemon balm-lemon verbena syrup reminds Jeanne of the multiple evolutionary origins of lemon flavor. The citrus lemon itself is only one of many plant species that lends its namesake flav...

Via Jennifer Mach
more...
Jennifer Mach's curator insight, October 13, 2013 4:39 PM

Blog post, not primary research paper.

From around the web

Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science
Medicinal Plants, Phytochemistry and Applied Botany
Curated by Meristemi
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Meristemi from Plants and Microbes
Scoop.it!

Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews: Oomycete Interactions with Plants: Infection Strategies and Resistance Principles (2015)

Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews: Oomycete Interactions with Plants: Infection Strategies and Resistance Principles (2015) | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it

The Oomycota include many economically significant microbial pathogens of crop species. Understanding the mechanisms by which oomycetes infect plants and identifying methods to provide durable resistance are major research goals. Over the last few years, many elicitors that trigger plant immunity have been identified, as well as host genes that mediate susceptibility to oomycete pathogens. The mechanisms behind these processes have subsequently been investigated and many new discoveries made, marking a period of exciting research in the oomycete pathology field. This review provides an introduction to our current knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms used by oomycetes, including elicitors and effectors, plus an overview of the major principles of host resistance: the established R gene hypothesis and the more recently defined susceptibility (S) gene model. Future directions for development of oomycete-resistant plants are discussed, along with ways that recent discoveries in the field of oomycete-plant interactions are generating novel means of studying how pathogen and symbiont colonizations overlap.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Meristemi from Plants and Microbes
Scoop.it!

Slides: Plant pathology in the post-genomics era (2015)

Presented at BASF Science Symposium: sustainable food chain - from field to table, Jun 23-24, 2015, Chicago.

 

Notes and acknowledgements at http://kamounlab.tumblr.com/post/122151022390/plant-pathology-in-the-post-genomics-era


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Meristemi
Scoop.it!

[Tome] | Plants Communicate Using An Internet Of Fungus - TIMEWHEEL

[Tome] | Plants Communicate Using An Internet Of Fungus - TIMEWHEEL | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
TIMEWHEEL is an artistic collective, audiovisual studio and blog.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Meristemi
Scoop.it!

Agroecology can help fix our broken food system. Here’s how.

Agroecology can help fix our broken food system. Here’s how. | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
The various incarnations of the sustainable food movement need a science with which to approach a system as complex as food and farming.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Meristemi
Scoop.it!

Sexual deception in orchids | OUPblog

Sexual deception in orchids | OUPblog | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
“In the spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love” (Alfred, Lord Tennyson), but he could have said the same for insects too. Male insects will be following the scent of females, looking for a partner, but not every female is what she seems to be. It might look like the orchid is getting some unwanted attention in the video below, but it’s actually the bee that’s the victim. The orchid has released complex scents to fool the bee into thinking it’s meeting a female.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Meristemi
Scoop.it!

Link of green tea extracts to liver injury raises age old question: How much of a good thing is too much?

Link of green tea extracts to liver injury raises age old question: How much of a good thing is too much? | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
Botanical ingredient experts are not surprised by a recent report on the association of green tea extracts with liver toxicity. It’s consistent with recent literature and could serve as a warning sign of the potential dangers lurking in the pharmaceutical-style, reductionist approach toward botanical ingredient development.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Meristemi
Scoop.it!

Orchid Observers | Natural History Museum

Orchid Observers | Natural History Museum | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
Photograph wild orchids and document Museum collections to examine what impact climate change is having on the UK’s orchids.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Meristemi
Scoop.it!

Can grains of the past help us weather storms of the future?

Can grains of the past help us weather storms of the future? | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
Combining science with traditional knowledge, researchers turn to ancient rice as a source of climate resilience
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Meristemi
Scoop.it!

Flowers Are “Darker” at Lower Latitudes

Flowers Are “Darker” at Lower Latitudes | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
UV radiation may explain why plants and animals closer to the equator come in darker varieties
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Meristemi
Scoop.it!

Ayahuasca Psychedelic Tested for Depression

Ayahuasca Psychedelic Tested for Depression | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
A pilot study with the shamanic brew hints at its therapeutic potential
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Meristemi
Scoop.it!

Widest possible photosynthesis, absorbing any color of sunlight, from oranges through near-infrared

Widest possible photosynthesis, absorbing any color of sunlight, from oranges through near-infrared | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
A small team of chemists, having learned the secrets of light absorption from chlorophylls a and b, can now tune molecules to absorb anywhere in the solar spectrum. They are using this facility to synthesize pigments that fill gaps in the sunlight absorbed by native pigments and to push deeper into the infrared than any native pigment.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Meristemi
Scoop.it!

Un nuovo aspetto per l’albero della vita | Zanichelli Aula di scienze

Un nuovo aspetto per l’albero della vita | Zanichelli Aula di scienze | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
La storia evolutiva di oltre 50.000 specie viventi è stata rappresentata in un nuovo albero della vita che rivela una nuova informazione: la vita si è espansa a velocità costante.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Meristemi from Plants and Microbes
Scoop.it!

Book: Leaf Defence: Edward E. Farmer - Oxford University Press (2014)

Book: Leaf Defence: Edward E. Farmer - Oxford University Press (2014) | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it

Leaves are among the most abundant organs on earth and are a defining feature of most terrestrial ecosystems. However, a leaf is also a potential meal for a hungry animal and the question therefore arises, why does so much foliage survive in nature? What mechanisms protect leaves so that, on a global scale, only a relatively small proportion of living leaf material is consumed? Leaf survival is in large part due to two processes: firstly, leaf-eating organisms fall prey to predators (top-down pressure on the herbivore); secondly, leaves defend themselves (bottom-up pressure on the herbivore). Remarkably, these two types of event are often linked; they are controlled and coordinated by plants and the molecular mechanisms that underlie this are now beginning to emerge.  

This novel text focuses exclusively on the leaf, on the herbivorous organisms that attack leaves, and the mechanisms that plants use to defend these vital organs. It begins with an assessment of the scale of herbivory, before examining direct physical and chemical defences on leaf surfaces and within the leaf itself. Although some leaf defences are easily seen, most operate at the molecular level and are therefore invisible to the naked eye. Many of these recently elucidated mechanisms are described. Throughout the book, perspectives from both the laboratory and the field are combined. A central feature of the work is its emphasis on the coevolution of leaf defences and the digestive tracts of animals including humans, making the book of relevance in understanding the role of leaf defences in agriculture. 

Leaf Defence is suitable for senior undergraduate and graduate students taking courses in plant science, as well as a broader audience of biologists and biochemists seeking a comprehensive and authoritative overview of this exciting and emerging topic.

 

Readership: Senior undergraduate and graduate students taking courses in plant science, as well as a broader audience of biologists and biochemists seeking a comprehensive and authoritative overview of this exciting and emerging topic.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Meristemi from Plants and Microbes
Scoop.it!

Nature News: Plant denizens get the big-science treatment (2015)

Nature News: Plant denizens get the big-science treatment (2015) | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it

A plant may be rooted in place, but it is never lonely. There are bacteria in, on and near it, munching away on their host, on each other, on compounds in the soil. Amoebae dine on bacteria, nematodes feast on roots, insects devour fruit — with consequences for the chemistry of the soil, the taste of a leaf or the productivity of a crop.

 

From 30 June to 2 July, more than 200 researchers gathered in Washington DC for the first meeting of the Phytobiomes Initiative, an ambitious proposal to catalogue and characterize a plant’s most intimate associates and their impact on agriculture. By the end of the year, attendees hope to carve out a project that will apply this knowledge in ways that will appeal to funders in industry and government.

 

“We want to get more money,” says plant pathologist Linda Kinkel at the University of Minnesota in St Paul. “But beyond that, let’s just all try to talk the same language and come up with some shared goals.”

 

Leach coined the term phytobiome in 2013,at a retreat about food security. She defines the phytobiome broadly, to encompass microbes, insects, nematodes and plants as well as the abiotic factors that influence all these.

 

Since then, she has visited companies, funding agencies and universities to call for a unifying phytobiomes initiative. She has teamed up with Kellye Eversole, a consultant based in Bethesda, Maryland, and the co-owner of a small family farm in Oklahoma, who has experience working on large agricultural genomics projects, including the US National Plant Genome Initiative. That initiative was launched in 1998 and continues to crank out databases and other tools for analysing plant genomes.

 

Leach hopes that the Phytobiomes Initiative will leave a similar legacy, but she is mindful that federal funding has tightened considerably since 1998. Still, she notes that the project can build on several emerging trends in agriculture. Industry has shown renewed interest in boosting plant growth by manipulating associated microbes (Nature 504, 199; 2013). Companies and farmers are also investing in ‘precision agriculture’, which uses high-tech monitors to track conditions in a field or even around individual plants, allowing farmers to water and fertilize in exactly the right places.

 

High-tech future

 

Eversole foresees a day when tractors will carry dipstick-like gauges that provide a snapshot of the microbial community in the soil. Data from the Phytobiomes Initiative would then help farmers to manipulate that community to their advantage, she says.

 

But first, the initiative needs to standardize protocols and metrics, the meeting’s attendees determined. Kinkel says that efforts are likely to focus initially on cataloguing microbes and insects and their interactions with different crops and habitats. “We’re where plant biologists were 150 years ago,” she says. “We’re still trying to inventory things.”

 

Work has already begun along these lines: for example, a group at the International Rice Research Institute in Los Baños in the Philippines is fishing for microbial DNA in data discarded from an effort to sequence the rice genome. The goal is to determine which microbes prefer which strains of the crop.

 

Kinkel, meanwhile, has begun experimenting with manipulating carbon levels in the soil to alter the microbial population, with the aim of improving plant productivity. “If we can understand better who lives on and within plants, we have the potential to manage them to have healthier, more resilient plants,” she says.

 

Projects such as these would move faster under an organized, cohesive framework, says Sarah Lebeis, a microbiologist at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville who is studying how plants manipulate microbial communities by secreting antibiotics into the soil. “Right now we’re working as individuals,” she says. “Having an initiative will give us focus and hopefully we’ll progress further, faster, better.”


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Meristemi
Scoop.it!

Dying Trees Can Send Food to Neighbors of Different Species via ‘Wood-Wide Web’

Dying Trees Can Send Food to Neighbors of Different Species via ‘Wood-Wide Web’ | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
No tree is an island, and no place is this truer than the forest. Hidden beneath the soil of the forest understory is a labyrinth of fungal connections between tree roots that scientists call the mycorrhizal network.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Meristemi
Scoop.it!

With Google’s Support, Plant Biologists Build First Online Database Of All The World’s Plant Species

With Google’s Support, Plant Biologists Build First Online Database Of All The World’s Plant Species | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
Four leading botanical gardens from around the world want to make it easier for researchers to identify plants in the field.
more...
Ra's curator insight, June 23, 5:14 PM

This is amazing. A huge project with implications for a range of industry. Not wikipedia but wouldn't you like to be part of it!

Scooped by Meristemi
Scoop.it!

Saharan Cypress - Global Trees

Saharan Cypress - Global Trees | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
The Saharan cypress is one of the world’s oldest trees, with ages in excess of 3000 yrs.  The trees are the relict species of a Saharan forest, from a time when the area had a milder, more mediterranean climate.  Today, the species is extremely rare, with only 233 known individuals left growing in the wild…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Meristemi
Scoop.it!

Ecologists make their own flowers to study moths - AoB Blog

Ecologists make their own flowers to study moths - AoB Blog | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
Thanks to JSTOR Global Plants for pointing to an interesting paper in Functional Ecology, Shape matters: corolla curvature improves nectar discovery in the
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Meristemi
Scoop.it!

Could traditional plants hold the secret to saving crops from pests?

Could traditional plants hold the secret to saving crops from pests? | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
Researchers build on age-old practices to reduce food loss in Africa
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Meristemi
Scoop.it!

What does the term microbiome mean? And where did it come from? A bit of a surprise ..

What does the term microbiome mean? And where did it come from? A bit of a surprise .. | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
Microbiome is such a hot term these days.  And one key question many ask is "what does it mean?"  A related question is - "where did the term come from?" I tried to tackle this many years ago on my...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Meristemi
Scoop.it!

The app that helps you discover edible weeds

The app that helps you discover edible weeds | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
Scientists from the University of California, Berkeley are using crowdsourcing to locate edible weeds in urban areas.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Meristemi
Scoop.it!

Started From The Bottom: The Discovery That Could Upend The Maple Syrup Industry

Started From The Bottom: The Discovery That Could Upend The Maple Syrup Industry | Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science | Scoop.it
A new discovery about how maple trees produce sap could change the way the industry works.
more...
No comment yet.