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Broadband Planning & Big Data for the Lake Michigan Region | Gigabit Fiber Networks | iCAIR

Broadband Planning & Big Data for the Lake Michigan Region | Gigabit Fiber Networks | iCAIR | Erate | Scoop.it

This coming Tuesday, April 16th from 3:30 to 5:00 pm the International Center for Advanced Internet Research (iCAIR) at Northwestern University will host a  workshop and a live webcast as part of the American Planning Association's annual conference in Chicago, IL. 

 

This workshop will cover Gigabit Broadband Planning and Big Data for the Lake Michigan Region and will include the live webcast for regional planners, telecommunications and data professionals, higher education IT professionals and the healthcare industry unable to attend in person. 

 

The link to the live webcast portal is: http://www.digibridge.net/gigabitfiber and includes video archives of past seminars and workshops on the subject.  Remote viewers will find the archived videos instructive and useful as context of Tuesday's webcast.

 

Click headline to access the iCAIR website to view the webcast and the archive of past webcasts--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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How to Pick an FCC Chair Who Gets It | Preeti Vissa Blog | Huff Post

How to Pick an FCC Chair Who Gets It | Preeti Vissa Blog | Huff Post | Erate | Scoop.it

 

With outgoing FCC Chair Julius Genachowski's next career move already announced, talk in Washington is that President Obama will be nominating his successor sooner rather than later. This is important to the future of all communities in a world increasingly dependent on telecommunications technology.

 

And getting this appointment right isn't as simple as it seems.

 

As my colleague Stephanie Chen has been pointing out in a series of posts lately, this is not just a question of finding someone with generic qualifications for working at the FCC -- smarts, knowledge of telecommunications, etc. Lots and lots of people have those basic qualifications.

 

What we need is someone specifically ready for the unique and complex challenges that telecom regulators will have to address over the next several years. Those challenges haven't gotten nearly enough attention from the media.

 

First of all, you might expect the world's leading economy to have a world-leading telecommunications network. Instead, out of 33 countries, we rank 15th in terms of broadband adoption, 9th in broadband speed, and 21st in broadband prices. Indeed, our phone companies have trouble guaranteeing you'll actually be able to place and receive a call when you want to.

 

Perhaps most critically, there's the question of "universal service." Universal Service -- the notion that everyone should have access to affordable telephone service at just and reasonable rates -- has been this country's policy since 1934. It's still a vital principle, but the technological landscape in which it operates is changing rapidly. Instead of essentially immobile devices connected by miles of copper wire, we now have mobile networks and increasing use of Voice over Internet Protocol, or VoIP, to transmit phone signals.

 

And, as Stephanie noted recently, that's where things get tricky:

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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A Failing Grade for Broadband - Slate Magazine

A Failing Grade for Broadband - Slate Magazine | Erate | Scoop.it
Slate Magazine A Failing Grade for Broadband Slate Magazine And the problem is not just at home: Nearly 80 percent of the schools receiving subsidies for broadband connections through the Federal Communication Commission's E-Rate program have...
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Jan Zanetis's comment, May 5, 2013 1:40 AM
Pretty sad state of affairs.
Jan Zanetis's curator insight, May 5, 2013 1:40 AM

Interesting stats from the U.S.

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eRate Reform, National Public Safety Network FirstNet, Focus of Senate-FCC Oversight Hearing | BroadbandBreakfast.com

At Tuesday’s oversight hearing of the Federal Communications Commission, Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.V., on Tuesday put the focus on the portion of the Universal Service Fund designed to provide connectivity to schools and libraries, as well as on the public safety network described as FirstNet. The Senate and the agency, he said, “need to think big about the future of eRate.”

 

Touting the success of the eRate in connecting the vast majority of classes to the internet, Rockefeller said it was necessary to continue to ensure that every child has access to the internet – and just how vital the internet is to current education system.

 

“More than 92 percent of classrooms have Internet access,” he said. “But, as impressive and important as this statistic is, basic internet connectivity is not sufficient to meet our 21st Century educational needs. Digital information and technology will continue to play an increasing role in education, so we need to think about how we are going to meet the broadband infrastructure needs of our schools and libraries.

 

Additionally, Rockefeller highlighted the importance of FirstNet, the “nationwide interoperable public safety network that our first responders are owed,” In a like fashion, he said that the internet is vital to fulfilling the needs of students around the country. “If every coffee shop in America can offer wireless connectivity, than by-golly every school should as well,” he said.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Australia: Can Turnbull deliver his NBN? Have your say | Biz Spectator

Australia: Can Turnbull deliver his NBN? Have your say | Biz Spectator | Erate | Scoop.it

 

Have a view on The Coalition's NBN plan? Have your say in our questionare below. 

 

The Coalition’s National Broadband Network (NBN) plan has been poorly received in many quarters and the subsequent NBN-related polls indicate that Labor’s NBN is a clear winner. 

 

Business will be affected by any decision to wind back the current NBN rollout and the extent of this concern will become evident as more becomes known about the Coalition NBN plan. Some of the members of the Australian Information Industry Association have cautiously supported elements of the plan and provided guidance of key concerns, including the need for the Coalition to ensure that Telstra is structurally separated and for NBN Co to be prevented from competing with internet service providers.

 

Just how NBN Co would remain solvent under the Coalition’s plan to bolster competition in the access market has not been explained by the Coalition.

 

As things stand, companies with existing access networks will be able to expand their networks and cherry pick customers in major urban areas without being required to commit to providing wholesale access for competitors or committing to products and price restrictions imposed on NBN Co.

 

This is just one of many issues that the shadow communications minister Malcolm Turnbull will need to address.

 

While the release of the Coalition’s long-awaited NBN policy provides a modicum of certainty for businesses and consumers, there are substantial execution and regulatory hurdles that could pose headaches for Turnbull. 


Click headline to read more and access hot link to survey--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Japan Unveils 2/1Gbps Fiber Broadband Service for $51/Month; Phone Service for $5.38 | Stop the Cap!

Japan Unveils 2/1Gbps Fiber Broadband Service for $51/Month; Phone Service for $5.38 | Stop the Cap! | Erate | Scoop.it

Japan has leapfrogged over Google’s revolutionary 1Gbps broadband service with twice the speed for roughly $20 less a month.

 

Sony-owned So-net Entertainment on Monday introduced its 2Gbps optical fiber GPON service called NURO, charging as little as $51 a month for 2/1Gbps service.

 

“Light NURO is reasonably priced, very high-speed fiber to the home broadband that delivers the world’s fastest speeds on technology usually reserved for commercial service,” the company said.

 

NURO is available in Tokyo and six Kantō region prefectures, including Kanagawa, Chiba, Saitama, Gunma, Tochigi, and Ibaraki.

 

Customers agreeing to a two-year contract get the best prices and a waiver (in certain circumstances) of installation fees as high as $540. Customers wishing to avoid a term contract can sign up for around $77 a month.

 

Customers are supplied a wireless router with support for speeds up to 450Mbps backwards-compatible with all Wi-Fi wireless devices.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Petition calls for more eRate funding | eSchool News

Petition calls for more eRate funding | eSchool News | Erate | Scoop.it

The federal eRate program, which helps schools and libraries connect to the internet, should receive more funding so that more schools and libraries can serve not only students, but community members as well, eRate compliance firm Funds For Learning wrote in a letter to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

 

In an open letter to FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski, John Harrington, CEO of Funds For Learning, requests that the commission increase the available funding in the eRate program and invites eRate stakeholders and supporters to sign the online petition before it is delivered to the FCC in early 2012.

 

In the letter, Harrington explains that schools and libraries, especially those in the nation’s poorer communities, rely on the eRate program as “the financial backbone that enables them to keep their sophisticated and expensive telecommunications networks up and running.”

 

“The eRate program has been hugely successful,” said Harrington. “However, with demand outpacing the available funding, it is time to consider how much more funding and regulatory support the commission should allocate to the eRate program, as the increase in funding, or lack thereof, will determine whether any schools or libraries get left behind.”

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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