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Dr. Stephen Krashen defends libraries at LAUSD Board Meeting - YouTube


Via Elizabeth Hutchinson
Dawn Nelson's insight:

Keeping our libraries strong supports the work to close the achievement gap. 

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Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, April 1, 2:55 AM

'The better the school library the higher the reading score' Keith Curry Lance

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Big Data Not Big Enough? How the Digital Divide Leaves People Out | Mediashift | PBS

Big Data Not Big Enough? How the Digital Divide Leaves People Out | Mediashift | PBS | Equitable Libraries | Scoop.it
The utopian hype over Big Data is being critiqued on many fronts. After all, it isn’t that new. The Romans and the Nazis amassed huge amounts of data on their populations. And then, of course, there is the creepy, Big Brother aspect.However, one problem no one seems to be talking about is that Big Data is too small.That may sound like a contradiction, what with the kajillions of information bytes that makes it not just data but “Big” data. Indeed, digital technology has enabled researchers to access, store and analyze unprecedented massive amounts of data, often online.But Big Data is too small when it is amassed, scraped and API’ed from the Internet, whether from tweets or Google searches. The problem is the digital divide.Specifically, people with lower levels of income and education are not accessing or creating online content nearly as much as people with a college degree and a comfortable middle-class lifestyle. That means if journalists, academics and policy makers rely on Big Data analytics, then they are ignoring issues important to many poor and working-class people.Click headline to read more--
Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Horrigan: Stop Using 'Digital Divide' Phrase | Techwire.net

National broadband expert and independent consultant John Horrigan suggested in a Board of Experts of a recent California Emerging Technology Fund (CETF) meeting that the public and private sector stop using the phrase “digital divide,” arguing that the issue is less about access to hardware and more about the skills to use them.
“Fewer people are not online than a half dozen years ago,” Horrigan said in a follow-up interview with Techwire. “That doesn’t mean efforts to bring the ‘not online’ into the columns of Internet users should stop. But focusing on the ‘online/not online’ issue as the main digital equity problem obscures a larger and looming one — differences in levels of digital skills for the online and offline population.”Instead, Horrigan prefers the term “digital readiness.”“The emerging challenge is about who’s ready and not ready to be online,” Horrigan said. “We need to build a user’s digital skills and trust, and we must cultivate ‘digital readiness’ and capacity for all users to go online.Since 1998, the percentage of Americans using the Internet has jumped from 36 percent to 85 percent in 2013; 70 percent of Americans have broadband in their homes and 56 percent use smartphones.However, according to data from the CETF, certain groups still have relatively low levels of broadband and smartphone adoption, including blacks, Latinos, those with high school degrees or less and senior citizens.There are multiple barriers that affect how many Americans get online, including cost, relevance in their lives and digital literacy. Since cost is not the only issue keeping people from using broadband and smartphones, Horrigan said that using cost incentives as the only way to help people adopt broadband is too little.“’Digital Readiness’ refers to helping people to acquire skills to use online applications that are going to become more consequential (e.g., telemedicine, education) but also (with the advent of the ‘Internet of things’) more daunting for some people,” Horrigan said. “Higher levels of Digital Readiness can accelerate the uptake of new application.”Click headline to read more--

Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 31, 2013 1:37 PM

It is about both. The divide is about skills and access. The latter has to do with SES issues.

Rescooped by Dawn Nelson from School Libraries and the importance of remaining current.
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Dr. Stephen Krashen defends libraries at LAUSD Board Meeting - YouTube


Via Elizabeth Hutchinson
Dawn Nelson's insight:

Keeping our libraries strong supports the work to close the achievement gap. 

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Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, April 1, 2:55 AM

'The better the school library the higher the reading score' Keith Curry Lance

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Bridging the Digital Divide: It's more than teaching computer skills...


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Rescooped by Dawn Nelson from Sharing Information literacy ideas
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Syracuse educator at forefront of national charge: 'Libraries change lives'

Syracuse educator at forefront of national charge: 'Libraries change lives' | Equitable Libraries | Scoop.it
A declaration for the right to libraries - especially for children,

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Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, March 30, 2:06 PM

Barbara Stripling is amazing! Everyone should read this. 

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The Rise of Writing Literacies, Implications for Libraries | DMLcentral

The Rise of Writing Literacies, Implications for Libraries | DMLcentral | Equitable Libraries | Scoop.it
The look of any library — school, academic, or public — is always dependent on local needs in a community, but the feature that has traditionally characterized all types of libraries is reading literacy and the tools and practices that support readers.
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