"Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions
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The Science and Psychology behind Patient Engagement

The Science and Psychology behind Patient Engagement | "Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art  | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions | Scoop.it
Patient engagement continues to be one of the hottest topics in the industry. However, most discussions seem to focus only on exciting new digital and mobile technologies that are empowering patients to manage their health and revolutionizing the ways they can do it. But technology is just one part of the complex process of patient engagement.

Where are the discussions about applying proven behavior change models or the principles of adult learning and health literacy? Studies have shown that patients of all literacy levels forget key information provided to them during doctor visits, sometimes within minutes! Low health literacy can create dangerous situations and even highly educated patients can be affected, particularly if they are sick. Therefore, a critical factor to successful patient engagement is the ability to develop patient education materials that are not only understandable, but are also appealing, relevant, and easy to act on.
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Recognition of Patient Expertise Can Improve Adherence --Doctors Lounge

Recognition of Patient Expertise Can Improve Adherence --Doctors Lounge | "Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art  | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions | Scoop.it
FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Recognizing the unique role of patients and their expertise within the physician-patient interaction can help to prevent non-adherence based on disagreement, according to an article published online May 18 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.
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Prescription Non-Adherence: A Bitter Pill to Swallow

Prescription Non-Adherence: A Bitter Pill to Swallow | "Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art  | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions | Scoop.it
Did you take your medicine the right way for the prescribed time the last time your doctor wrote you a prescription? If you did, you are in the minority. 

A review of drug adherence and strategies to overcome non-adherence highlights some of the issues:
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Reading may save your life - PMLiVE

Reading may save your life - PMLiVE | "Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art  | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions | Scoop.it
Why is all this important? Because research shows that people who are better informed about their health status are more likely to have better outcomes. In fact, let me be far more precise: differences in health literacy levels have been consistently associated with increased hospitalisations, greater emergency care use, lower use of mammography, lower receipt of influenza vaccine, poorer ability to demonstrate taking medications appropriately, poorer ability to interpret labels and health messages, and, among seniors, poorer overall health status and higher mortality. And it's important because in today's day and age of 'information at my fingertips', there are an increasing number of people who self-diagnose and self-treat based on information they've found online.
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Why Your Patient Story Matters

Why Your Patient Story Matters | "Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art  | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions | Scoop.it
In her latest blog, Marie Ennis-O'Connor explains how you can benefit from telling your story.

Via Patient Empowerment Network
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Is it time to change the way we use social media in medicine?

It’s no secret that social media has now consumed most of our lives. It’s everywhere and there’s really no avoiding it. Don’t get me wrong, social media is a powerful tool and when used appropriately a lot of good things can come out of it. For instance, as a medical student who moved from New York to Los Angeles, it helps me stay connected to my loved ones back home.

However, social media has now expanded beyond the realm of liking photos from your best friend’s wedding. It has been incorporated into a variety of business models. It’s no surprise to me that you can now buy a product by clicking on an Instagram post, or pinning a pin on Pinterest.


Aside from retail, social media has now made headway in the field of medicine. Oftentimes, I scroll through my Instagram feed and see quick 30 to 60 second clips of physicians performing cosmetic procedures on patients (of course, with consent). Physicians also have a growing presence on television as well. Flip through your TV channels or your Netflix guide and see how many new shows and reality series you find documenting the lives of doctors and their practices. Truthfully, I don’t think that this is necessarily a bad thing. I personally love binge-watching episodes of physician-centered reality shows when I have the time, or watching quick Instagram clips of filler injections, “surgery-free” rhinoplasties, Botox injections, and other cosmetic procedures.


With that being said, I can’t help but feel like a lot of the medical messages in social media have been for self-gain. One of my favorite doctors that I like to see on Instagram recently started a new page where she started to post advice. I was glad to see her using her “instafame” to draw attention to more than her practice and the procedures that she offered.

However, within a few weeks, the following on her new page grew and what I thought was going to be an educational page became a platform for her new cosmetic products that she was launching. When I scroll through the feeds of some of the more “popular” physicians, I mostly see advertisements for their practices and products that they sell.

Let me be clear, I am 100 percent in support of entrepreneurship and expanding your network. And I do realize that there are physicians in the media spreading knowledge and vital information, but these days it seems like those posts are few and far between.

Like I said before, social media has revolutionized the way we live our lives and the way we teach, communicate, learn, and conduct business. However, I think that we need to do more to revolutionize the way that we use social media in medicine. If we get creative, I think we can use social media for more than promoting ourselves, and instead, use it to educate patients and to reach those who we would have a harder time reaching otherwise.

Honestly, I’m not sure how one would embark on a task like this, but I think it’s an important discussion to have. If you’d like to brainstorm with me, you can catch me during my breaks between shelf studying and watching episodes of the latest medical reality show.


Via Plus91, Chanfimao
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Patient education, nudge, and manipulation: defining the ethical conditions of the person-centered model of care

Patient education, nudge, and manipulation: defining the ethical conditions of the person-centered model of care | "Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art  | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions | Scoop.it
Abstract: Patient education (PE) is expected to help patients with a chronic disease to manage their lives and give them the possibility of adopting, in an appropriate manner, beneficial changes in health behaviors that are prescribed by their physicians. It is aimed at delineating, agreeing on, and implementing a patient’s personal action plan and is therefore an essential constituent of the person-centered model of care. The aim of this article is to examine the idea that PE may sometimes be a manipulation that is organized for the good of patients in a paternalistic framework. Theoretically, PE differs from manipulation by addressing the reflective intelligence of patients in full light and helping them make autonomous choices. In this article, we examined some analogies between PE and nudge (ie, techniques used to push people to make good choices by organizing their environment). This analysis suggests that PE is not always as transparent and reflective as it is supposed to be and that unmasking these issues may be useful for improving the ethical quality of educational practice that must be performed in a framework of a trusting patient–doctor relationship. Under this condition, PE may sometimes represent a form of persuasion without being accused of patient deception and manipulation: trust is therefore the core of the person-centered model of care.
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Penn’s Melanie Mariano to Turn Public Libraries Into Hubs of Health Information

Penn’s Melanie Mariano to Turn Public Libraries Into Hubs of Health Information | "Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art  | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions | Scoop.it
Public libraries serve communities in myriad ways, providing places where people gather to read, learn a new language, access the internet, pick up tax forms or apply for jobs.

During the next year, with leadership from University of Pennsylvania student Melanie Mariano, Philadelphia’s public libraries will also become hubs of health information and preventive health for the city’s residents.

“The library is a place of social capital, it's a place people see as a safe haven,” Mariano says. “If I can provide library visitors something similar to what a health clinic can provide in a less-intimidating environment, then why shouldn’t a nurse be there?”
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Cracking the code of health care terminology

Cracking the code of health care terminology | "Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art  | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions | Scoop.it
For years, it has been received wisdom: if you are a doctor or a nurse, the language you speak belongs to you alone. Patients can’t possibly use or understand it.
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How Pill Color Affects Drug Adherence

How Pill Color Affects Drug Adherence | "Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art  | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions | Scoop.it
Editor's Note:
While on site at the 2016 American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting, Medscape interviewed Tricia Ting, MD, associate professor in the Department of Neurology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, about her new study exploring the influence of pill color on drug adherence.
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JIM.fr - Autonomie des patients : les pharmaciens hospitaliers peuvent agir

JIM.fr - Autonomie des patients : les pharmaciens hospitaliers peuvent agir | "Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art  | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions | Scoop.it
Paris, le lundi 23 mai 2016 - Avec plus de 40 sessions et un thème majeur « Les pharmaciens d'hôpitaux prennent l'initiative - les partenariats et les technologies », le 21èmecongrès annuel de l’Association européenne des pharmaciens hospitaliers (EAHP) a rassemblé 3500 participants de 73 pays à Vienne (Autriche) du 16 au 18 mars. Une attention particulière a été accordée à certains sujets tels que : la refonte des services autour du patient ; l'autonomisation des malades grâce à la technologie ; les nouvelles façons de distribuer les médicaments ; les médicaments de thérapie innovante : les nouvelles compétences en pharmacie hospitalière ; la lutte contre la résistance aux antimicrobiens,etc…

Des soins centrés sur le patient

Le Congrès a ouvert sur le thème de l'autonomisation des patients, avec un pharmacien hospitalier et un patient atteint de maladie chronique qui ont présenté en duo les nouveaux développements mis en place au Canada. Ils ont souligné combien les professionnels de santé peuvent apprendre en écoutant les expériences des patients. Malgré tous les efforts entrepris, la réalité reste cependant que nous manquons encore de volonté pour consolider l'autonomisation du patient, regrette l’EAHP. À cet égard, et ce fut l'une des conclusions du congrès, les pharmaciens hospitaliers sont de plus en plus convaincus qu'ils peuvent prendre les devants dans l’implémentation de cette nouvelle vision et l'éducation interprofessionnelle.

L'EAHP lance un appel aux administrations et gouvernements soulignant que « si les soins de santé doivent être centrés sur le patient il faut mettre à la disposition des pharmaciens les outils adéquats », a indiqué l’irlandaise Joan Peppard, présidente de l’association, qui a succédé au Dr Roberto Frontini depuis juin 2015. L'EAHP dénonce le manque d'accès du pharmacien aux dossiers médicaux. Il y a beaucoup d'obstacles juridiques, selon les pays, empêchant les pharmaciens d’avoir accès au dossier médical, arappelé la présidente. Elle reconnait par ailleurs l’aide apportée par la prescription électronique, mais à l'égard de la pharmacothérapie, elle souligne que le système doit répondre à certaines lacunes, comme la vérification de l’automédication des patients.
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NHS England » Patient activation and PAM FAQs

What is patient activation?

Patient activation describes the knowledge, skills and confidence a person has in managing their own health and care.

The concept of patient activation links to all the principles of person-centred care, and offers care that is suitably personalised and supports people to recognise and develop their own strengths and abilities. It is an asset-based approach that puts individuals in the driving seat by increasing their capability. It supports people by giving them information they can understand and act on, and provides them with support that is tailored to their needs.
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Most cancers preventable

Most cancers preventable | "Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art  | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions | Scoop.it
There was a time when doctors would have the difficult conversation with patients about their weight and lack of exercise, but most doctors just don’t have the time to treat people as opposed to health conditions.

Pharma companies, as marketers, have found opportunities in Americans poor health habits.  The first line of treatment for high cholesterol is prescribing a statin as opposed to telling patients to change their diets.  Most ED is due to lack of exercise and poor weight control, but it’s easier to just ask for an Rx for Cialis.
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New report identifies six practices to improve health care for disadvantaged populations

A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine identifies six promising practices to improve health care for individuals with social risk factors for poor health care outcomes, such as people who are in a low socio-economic position, reside in disadvantaged neighborhoods, identify as a racial or ethnic minority, or possess limited health literacy. The committee that carried out the study and wrote the report said it is possible to deliver high-quality care to these populations. With adequate resources, providers can feasibly respond to incentives to deliver high-quality and good-value care to socially at-risk populations. This is the second report in a series of five that addresses social risk factors that affect the health care outcomes of Medicare beneficiaries and ways to account for these factors in Medicare payment programs.
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WHO IRIS: Health literacy toolkit for low- and middle-income countries : A series of information sheets to empower communities and strengthen health systems

WHO IRIS: Health literacy toolkit for low- and middle-income countries : A series of information sheets to empower communities and strengthen health systems | "Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art  | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions | Scoop.it
This series of information sheets introduces health literacy, its relevance to public policy, and the ways it can be used to inform the promotion of good health, the prevention and management of communicable and noncommunicable diseases, and the reduction of health inequities. It provides information and links to further resources to assist organizations and governments to incorporate health literacy responses into practice, service delivery systems, and policy.
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Helping women take health into their own hands | Toronto Star

Helping women take health into their own hands | Toronto Star | "Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art  | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions | Scoop.it
Accessing health information is as simple as keying a few search terms into your computer's browser. But can you trust the results — especially when it comes to women's health?
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Patients with low literacy levels get health information from commercial websites | Science Codex

MAYWOOD, IL - When searching the internet for health information, people with less education and lower literacy levels are more likely to visit poorer quality commercial websites, according to a study by researchers at Loyola Medicine and Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

"These findings should encourage physicians to guide patients towards appropriate high quality websites, particularly patients with low literacy and/or education levels," senior author Gopal N. Gupta, MD and colleagues wrote in the ARC Journal of Urology.
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Readability of online health information for patients with pancreatic cancer

The degree to which patients are empowered by written educational materials depends on the text's readability level and the accuracy of the information provided. A patient's health literacy or ability to comprehend written health information can impact clinical outcomes. Reading materials are rarely written at the recommended sixth-grade reading level. Tara S. Kent, M.D., of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, and colleagues compared the readability and accuracy of patient-oriented online resources for pancreatic cancer by treatment method and website affiliation. The researchers conducted an online search of 50 websites discussing 5 pancreatic cancer treatment methods (alternative therapy, chemotherapy, clinical trials, radiation therapy, and surgery). The website's affiliation was identified. Readability was measured by 9 standardized tests, and accuracy was assessed by an expert panel.
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BMC Research Notes

BMC Research Notes | "Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art  | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions | Scoop.it
Background
Health literacy (HL) is low for 40–50 % of the population in developed nations, and is strongly linked to many undesirable health outcomes. Older adults are particularly at risk. The intervention research on health literacy in ageing populations project systematically created a large inventory of HL interventions targeting adults age 50+ , to support practical production of policy and practice guidelines for promoting health literacy in European populations.
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How to read and understand a scientific paper: a guide for non-scientists - Jennifer Raff

How to read and understand a scientific paper: a guide for non-scientists - Jennifer Raff | "Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art  | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions | Scoop.it

From vaccinations to climate change, getting science wrong has very real consequences. But journal articles, a primary way science is communicated in academia, are a different format to newspaper articles or blogs and require a level of skill and undoubtedly a greater amount of patience. Here Jennifer Raff has prepared a helpful guide for non-scientists on how to read a scientific paper. These steps and tips will be useful to anyone interested in the presentation of scientific findings and raise important points for scientists to consider with their own writing practice.

My post, The truth about vaccinations: Your physician knows more than the University of Google sparked a very lively discussion, with comments from several people trying to persuade me (and the other readers) that their paper disproved everything that I’d been saying. While I encourage you to go read the comments and contribute your own, here I want to focus on the much larger issue that this debate raised: what constitutes scientific authority?

It’s not just a fun academic problem. Getting the science wrong has very real consequences. For example, when a community doesn’t vaccinate children because they’re afraid of “toxins” and think that prayer (or diet, exercise, and “clean living”) is enough to prevent infection, outbreaks happen.

“Be skeptical. But when you get proof, accept proof.” –Michael Specter

What constitutes enough proof? Obviously everyone has a different answer to that question. But to form a truly educated opinion on a scientific subject, you need to become familiar with current research in that field. And to do that, you have to read the “primary research literature” (often just called “the literature”). You might have tried to read scientific papers before and been frustrated by the dense, stilted writing and the unfamiliar jargon. I remember feeling this way!  Reading and understanding research papers is a skill which every single doctor and scientist has had to learn during graduate school.  You can learn it too, but like any skill it takes patience and practice.

 


Via Giuseppe Fattori
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The future of health communication. Innovating through partnerships. Written by Scott C. Ratzan

The future of health communication. Innovating through partnerships. Written by Scott C. Ratzan | "Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art  | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions | Scoop.it

The Preamble of the Constitution of the World Health Organization reminds us that «Informed opinion and active cooperation on the part of the public are of the utmost importance in the improvement of the health of the people» (Grad, 2002). Nonetheless, nearly seven decades later, the conditions under which people can be informed and actively participate in their health management in a meaningful way are being globally challenged. Drawing from experience in a variety of areas that I will delve into in this article, I remain a believer that we can marshal the necessary forces to advance the communication of health issues and create a base for a health-literate population to make smart(er), healthier decisions that advance health and well-being.

Keywords: health communication, health literacy, Ebola, vaccines, innovation.

 The ultimate goal of health communication is to advance an informed and empowered individual who can make smart choices for themselves, their families and communities whether it be in daily life, business and/or public policy. While the goal and practice may seem elusive, a simple fundamental tenet is that we need to advance our communication prowess to develop health literacy from individuals to the body politic. Ideally, an ethical, evidence-based communication approach can build upon historical challenges of how we address issues in science and health – from creationism to the heliocentric theory of the universe to nuclear physics to climate change. While Darwin, Galileo, Copernicus and others challenged the conventional wisdom and the «faith-based» approach of their time, countless others joined then and now in advancing science-based approaches to make the world a better place.

 


Via Giuseppe Fattori
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Op-ed: Nurses have been on front lines of patient advocacy since Nightingale

Direct care nurses (those who care for patients at the bedside or in the clinic) are key safety advocates in their work to assess patient needs and to double check that drug interactions or inappropriate drugs are avoided before the nurse administers the medications. Any procedure proposed for the patient must also make sense to the attending nurse, who has an ethical responsibility to understand the rationale for the plan for their patient.

Nurses are the last safety shield for patients. We are patient advocates across health care settings. We are also the health care professional who has the most contact with the patient.
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An Alert, Well-Hydrated Artist in No Acute Distress--Episode Sixteen: The Patient Will See You Now

An Alert, Well-Hydrated Artist in No Acute Distress--Episode Sixteen: The Patient Will See You Now | "Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art  | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions | Scoop.it
While there’s plenty of bad information in cyberspace that can pique a patient’s curiosity (and sometimes her paranoia), a discerning patient-detective can sift through sites and become educated about her illness. A patient’s research can make appointments more complex for doctors than they used to be; patients like Hadley and me often arrive with a list of questions about new research and therapies. In her book, In the Kingdom of the Sick, Laurie Edwards addresses this doctor-patient paradigm shift:
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Five Reasons to 'Like' Patients’ Use of Social Media

Social media also are transforming the nature of health care interactions. With greater emphasis placed on patient engagement as we move from the sick-care model to one of prevention and wellness, timely access to credible health information is essential to the health system. In addition, patients and family members who share disease and treatment experiences can play an important role in achieving better patient and population health outcomes.

As social media and their applications in health care continue to evolve, it’s worth taking a snapshot of where we are today and where we may be headed.
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4 Steps to Achieve Patient Engagement With Technology

4 Steps to Achieve Patient Engagement With Technology | "Patient empowerment through health education, health literacy, e-health literacy, public health promotion, narrative tools & art  | e-patients | Patient expertise | Patient advocacy | Shared health decision making" by VAB Traductions | Scoop.it
For hospitals and health systems to begin the transformation from patient satisfaction to patient engagement, leaders of these organizations should consider the following steps:

First, consider the patient journey. While all patient experiences are unique, patients share the common insights–focused framework of “think, feel, do.” By taking the following questions into consideration, health care leaders can assess the services and technology that they already possess or need to implement:

• How do patients think about their condition?

• How do patients feel about their condition?

• What do patients need to do?

This framework helps organizations improve health literacy, support behavior change, provide comprehensive support and deliver a more seamless experience that is in line with patients’ need to manage their diagnosis. It also helps organizations establish a human-forward mindset, ensuring that all patients have their needs addressed holistically.

Second, develop digital expertise. Once leaders have identified patient engagement needs through the “think, feel, do” framework, they should develop their expertise in digital health solutions. In other words, they should fully evaluate and understand the types of devices and technologies available to them, such as wearables, sensors, tele-health solutions and caregiver collaboration tools. By doing so, leaders will be able to appropriately select engagement technologies that match the needs and circumstances of their patients.

Third, seek simplicity and then educate. While many younger patients are comfortable with technology, much of the older population can be turned off by the mere suggestion of using a computer or a smartphone. The technology must be accessible, be easy to understand and provide clear benefits if you’re going to convince older users it’s worth the trouble.

Consider solutions that are user-friendly and come with a logical plan to bring doctors and patients up to speed on the benefits and value of the tools. Always provide step-by-step instructions on how to use each device or program. Also consider using visual storytelling to make topics easy to understand. Video, infographics and data visualization can be powerful communication tools.

Fourth, assess use and adjust as needed. Following implementation, periodically assess each solution to pinpoint levels of use and identify potential issues. In evaluating these factors, health care systems can make adjustments to further improve patient engagement as well as to scale their solution to patient needs now and into the future.
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Curated by VAB Traductions
French-born ENG to FR independent translator focused on patient empowerment through health literacy, health education, social media, digital health, HIT, narrative tools & art.