Enzymes
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The effects of mutations

The effects of mutations | Enzymes | Scoop.it
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explains how changes in DNA affect proteins which enzymes are made of.

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Introduction (Introduction to Enzymes)

summarizes basic theories of enzymology
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Detailed description of enzymes, use links on the right of the page for specifics.

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Chem4Kids.com: Biochemistry: Enzymes

Chem4Kids.com! The web site that teaches the basics of chemistry to everyone!
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A good general overview of enzymes in an easy to read manner.

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Factors affecting Enzyme Activity | A Level Notes

The activity of an Enzyme is affected by its environmental conditions. Changing these alter the rate of reaction caused by the enzyme.
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Some good enzyme information, particuarly a piece at the end that describes how concentration levels affect catalytic activity.

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Enzyme Inhibitors

Enzyme Inhibitors | Enzymes | Scoop.it
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Discusses active and allosteric inhibition as well as toxins. The pictures are particuarly useful.

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Enzyme naming conventions

Enzymes /ˈɛnzmz/ are large biological molecules responsible for the thousands of chemical interconversions that sustain life.[1][2] They are highly selective catalysts, greatly accelerating both the rate and specificity of metabolic reactions, from the digestion of food to the synthesis of DNA. Most enzymes are proteins, although some catalytic RNA molecules have been identified. Enzymes adopt a specific three-dimensional structure, and may employ organic (e.g. biotin) and inorganic (e.g. magnesium ion) cofactors to assist in catalysis.

In enzymatic reactions, the molecules at the beginning of the process, called substrates, are converted into different molecules, called products. Almost all chemical reactions in a biological cell need enzymes in order to occur at rates sufficient for life. Since enzymes are selective for their substrates and speed up only a few reactions from among many possibilities, the set of enzymes made in a cell determines which metabolic pathways occur in that cell.

Like all catalysts, enzymes work by lowering the activation energy (Ea) for a reaction, thus dramatically increasing the rate of the reaction. As a result, products are formed faster and reactions reach their equilibrium state more rapidly. Most enzyme reaction rates are millions of times faster than those of comparable un-catalyzed reactions. As with all catalysts, enzymes are not consumed by the reactions they catalyze, nor do they alter the equilibrium of these reactions. However, enzymes do differ from most other catalysts in that they are highly specific for their substrates. Enzymes are known to catalyze about 4,000 biochemical reactions.[3] A few RNA molecules called ribozymes also catalyze reactions, with an important example being some parts of the ribosome.[4][5] Synthetic molecules called artificial enzymes also display enzyme-like catalysis.[6]

wikipedia entry with links to overviews on each kind of enzyme chemistry


Via Blake Gillespie
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From Wikipedia, but has a lot of good accurate information.

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