Environments Stage 1
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Environments Stage 1
ENS1.5 Compares and contrasts natural and built features in their local area and the ways in which people interact with these ENS1.6 Demonstrates an understanding of the relationship between environments and people * Students in S1 will learn about changes to the immediate environment as a result of meeting needs and wants.
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People and the environment | Global Education

People and the environment | Global Education | Environments Stage 1 | Scoop.it
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Michelle Diab's comment, April 13, 2013 12:23 AM
Activities 1 and 2 on the Global Education webpage, ‘People and the Environment’ are useful Global Perspectives teaching resources for a Stage 1 introduction into my designated subject matter dot point. Both activities allow students to “engage in a process of interpretation” such as observing, viewing, speaking and drawing. Furthermore, the concepts being taught directly relate to the subject matter dot point and through discussion the students can share and learn new ideas (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p. 17). Pedagogical research has shown that it is beneficial for teachers to promote an enriched understanding of subject matter to students as both a sole entity and part of society. Students can recognise their significance in the world as they compare and contrast Australia’s use of the environment to other countries around the world (New South Wales Department of Education and Training, 2003, p.7).

As the children are only in Stage 1, Activity 1 may introduce new countries and cultural environmental practices. A link to an array of images showing land use around the world is available as a complementary source for students to promote a visual understanding of the content. Deep and problematic knowledge (p.11) are promoted in Activity 2 through a PMI chart which requires students to assess the positive and negative impacts of human land modifications, as well as the interesting aspects of these uses.

Overall, this resource offers a global perspective by challenging students and teachers to think about the issue with regards to the entire human environments, whilst drawing on themes of change, diversity, poverty and wealth and sustainability (Commonwealth of Australia, 2008).


References

Commonwealth of Australia. (2008). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools. Carlton South, Victoria: Education Services Australia.

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning.

New South Wales Department of Education and Training. (2003, May). Professional Support And Curriculum Directorate. Quality Teaching in NSW Public Schools Discussion Paper. Sydney, Australia. Retrieved from: https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/proflearn/docs/pdf/qt_EPSColor.pdf
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The Land - Australian Museum

The Land - Australian Museum | Environments Stage 1 | Scoop.it
Indigenous people have occupied Australia for at least 60 000 years and have evolved with the land - changing it and changing with it.
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Michelle Diab's comment, April 12, 2013 10:33 PM
This Australian Government website is a beneficial resource for teachers who wish to educate students about the designated subject matter dot point from an Indigenous Australian point of view. It simply provides information about Aboriginal land use which contrasts with most modern Australian land use, particularly the Cronulla Esplanade upgrade. For example, rather than clearing the land to add new features such as a concrete path, Aboriginals would use resources from the land that would regenerate. It is important that students have knowledge about the ways in which Aboriginals view the land, and the lack of change they impose on their environment, as principles of respect and sustainability can be learnt. Students can also learn how Aboriginal perspectives influenced current laws on environmental protection, such as protection of cultural and environmental heritage sites.

Activity idea: students can learn about the ways Aboriginals used the land to meet their needs and wants, without performing drastic modifications. After the teacher has explained the significance of the natural land to the Aboriginal people, five stations are set up where students can kinaesthetically and artistically explore Aboriginal land usage. Once the students are done, they can share their creations with the class.
Marking the land: students can attempt Aboriginal art on small rocks.A land of plenty: in order to educate children about ‘bush tucker’, flash cards with different types of food drawn on them can be placed on the ground. Students must guess which foods could and could not be gathered from the land by the Aboriginal people e.g. a muesli bar vs. an apple.The sea: Using paddle pop sticks and clag glue, students can make rafts and stick them on a large piece of blue cardboard to symbolise Aboriginal water transport.Hunting implementations: students can draw, decorate and cut out a cardboard boomerang.Housing: Using bark and clag glue, students can make shelters by sticking the bark onto a piece of cardboard. Note: this source was limited because it did not include information on shelter, which can be derived from: http://www.aboriginalculture.com.au/housing.shtml

This resource highlights the core of Pedagogical Content Knowledge as information that is mostly illegible to Stage 1 learners is transformed into an understandable manner, as the children learn by doing through creative means (Mishra and Koehler, 2006, p. 1021). This aspect of educating requires the teacher to think about how a webpage of information can be taught to students who cannot read it, which requires only key concepts to be highlighted, due to a lack of prior knowledge.


References

Mishra, P. & Koehler, M.J. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College Record Volume 108, Number 6, pp. 1017-1054.
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MapSkip - Places Have Stories!

MapSkip - Places Have Stories! | Environments Stage 1 | Scoop.it
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Michelle Diab's comment, April 13, 2013 2:27 AM
MapSkip is a visual and interactive teaching resource for an introduction into the subject matter dot point, specifically addressing changes to the immediate local environment in Cronulla to meet needs and wants. Instead of presenting information on the Cronulla Esplanade Upgrade to the students in written form, the information can be told in ‘stories’ on the MapSkip program. Teachers simply create an account and search for ‘Cronulla’ on the Google-powered map. Once the relevant area is zoomed in on, information about the upgrade – available from the Sutherland Shire Council website – can be broken down into stories on the map and complemented with images of the area.

Presentation and use of the resource is not limited. Examples include:

- Teachers presenting the information to students on a Smart Board, where students can add their own ‘stories’ such as how the facilities built will meet their needs and wants, and the environmental impact of the upgrade. Information on the upgrade, as well as images, can be derived from this Sutherland Shire Council webpage: http://www.sutherlandshire.nsw.gov.au/Building_Development/Council_Works_Projects/Completed_Projects/Cronulla_Seawall_Esplanade_Upgrade
- If students have access to a computer each, they can navigate the prepared map at their own leisure and create their own ‘stories’ such as those suggested in the previous example. They can share stories with the person sitting next to them to allow for more interaction.
- An extended activity could involve zooming out of the map to show more beaches and landmarks in Cronulla, with students brainstorming potential sustainable changes within these areas.

As well as addressing the curriculum outcome, this resource can teach children about the geography of their local area and can serve as an introduction to digital mapping and navigation.
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This Is My Neighborhood | Scholastic.com

This Is My Neighborhood | Scholastic.com | Environments Stage 1 | Scoop.it
Presents a lesson that helps students get to know their way around the school's neighborhood by identifying features with the four senses.
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Michelle Diab's comment, April 13, 2013 2:34 AM
This lesson plan requires students to visit and explore their local environment – in this case, the Cronulla Esplanade – to then work together and create a map with a key. Along with preparing and collecting consent forms, parents may accompany a student if they do not feel comfortable to attend alone. This task allows for complete student engagement as they can immerse themselves in the relevant environment. The creation of a map is a form of substantive communication as the students are showing their understanding through direct involvement (New South Wales Department of Education and Training, 2003). Students can directly see and experience the benefits of the Esplanade Upgrade and how their individual needs and wants are met. For example, they can walk across the boardwalk and sit on the sun beds in the aesthetically pleasing environment.

'This Is My Neighborhood' promotes emancipatory knowledge (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p. 9) and environmental responsibility (p. 82) as students can observe the ways in which the natural environment was sustained during construction. Other subject matter dot points are addressed during completion of the map, including: everyday words for location, position and direction; uses of places in their local area; natural, built and heritage features in the immediate environment and in other areas; adaptations to environments to fulfil needs; and personal and shared values and responsibilities towards features, sites, places and environments (Board of Studies, 2007, p.49).

The activity requires the creation of a map key to identify features such as parks, streets, footpaths and buildings. Student’s literacy skills are addressed in this element of the task as they learn new words to meet an important educational goal (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p. 160). They can show their understanding of the ways in which humans use the environment to meet their wants and needs by being able to spell out exactly what was built from their observations.


References

Board of Studies. (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney, Australia: Author.

Gilbert, R. and Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning.

New South Wales Department of Education and Training. (2003, May). Professional Support And Curriculum Directorate. Quality Teaching in NSW Public Schools Discussion Paper. Sydney, Australia: Author. Retrieved from: https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/proflearn/docs/pdf/qt_EPSColor.pdf
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quikmaps.com :: maps for the masses

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Michelle Diab's comment, April 13, 2013 12:23 AM
Quickmaps.com is an interactive resource powered by Google Maps. Students can sign up within seconds without an email, making it an efficient teaching and learning resource. Students are able to mark the map through drawing lines, freehand ‘scribble’, placing markers and adding text labels. This is a great source for a Stage 1 learner as the website is easy to use and students will enjoy adding a diverse range of markers to their maps, including people, devices, food and those related to the beach. Students will also benefit from being able to digitally engage in their local area, whilst creating abstract features, paving the way for education through enjoyment and interaction.

This resource can be utilised in the classroom where a computer lab is available, because each individual student may need assistance. Once they have set up an account, the teacher can then instruct the students to search for ‘Cronulla’ on their maps and locate the area where the recent upgrade took place. Provided that the students are already familiar with the upgrade via the MapSkip presentation, they will be asked to create an additional feature to the upgrade and demonstrate, using emancipatory knowledge (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011), how it could meet the needs and wants of their family if they were to take a day trip to the beach. For example, if a student wishes to take his grandparents, they may propose additional seating and handrails. Their individual maps can be described and saved as a link for the teacher to assess and/or place on a blog for peer observation. This activity will strengthen student’s problem solving skills, as well as their understanding of the interaction between society and the environment.


References:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning.