Communities, Regions and Environments in Australia and in the World
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Communities, Regions and Environments in Australia and in the World
This site is directed for teachers of Stage 3 working on this topic
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Teachers' kit - a guide to the rainforests of NSW - Publication | NSW Environment & Heritage

Teachers' kit - a guide to the rainforests of NSW - Publication | NSW Environment & Heritage | Communities, Regions and Environments in Australia and in the World | Scoop.it
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mrod9872's comment, April 17, 2013 10:10 PM
As Gilbert & Hoepper, (2011) state “Planning for social and environment studies involves meeting outcomes that incorporate knowledge and understandings, skills and processes, and values and attitudes” (p.106) this teacher's kit has been prepared to help teach about the important values of rainforests in NSW. Students will learn about rainforest types, structure, energy and nutrient cycles and food chains. Further fact sheets cover the importance of rainforests, the human impact upon them and managing for risk.

This unit expands upon the HSIE sample unit 'Global Environments - Rainforests' from the HSIE syllabus support document and encourages local field studies of rainforests.

The teacher's kit is developed by NPWS Discovery for Schools staff in the north coast region to support schools participating in the Discovery for Schools excursion program. It contains an information booklet about the rainforests of NSW, student worksheets for stages 1, 2 and 3, a rainforest model for students to colour and build and excursion outlines and supporting material (teacher's notes, student fact sheets, student work sheets) for various sites in NSW.

This is an example of an online resource accessible for teacher which focuses on local environment in this case the rainforests.

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.
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Classroom Antarctica

Classroom Antarctica | Communities, Regions and Environments in Australia and in the World | Scoop.it
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mrod9872's comment, April 17, 2013 10:08 PM
An important part of the second goal of The Melbourne Declaration focuses on creating successful learners who Gilbert & Hoepper, (2011) describe as “able to make sense of their world and think about how things have become the way they are”. (p. 7)

Classroom Antarctica focuses on the study of significant environmental and social issues from a global perspective and promotes an appreciation of the important role of Australians in Antarctica. Students will be encouraged to think critically about the key issues currently facing Antarctica: climate change, tourism, whaling, fishing, mineral exploitation, resource management and the impact of humans on the environment.

This link is a comprehensive online teaching resource produced by the Australian Antarctic Division, aimed at grades 5 to 8. Each unit has a selection of activities you can mix and match to meet your own school, state or national learning objectives. Teachers can adapt the activities to the range of abilities in their class and the particular interests of individual students.

Using the resources found on the Australian Antarctic Division's website and drawing on supporting materials from other relevant sites, the research and materials need to develop by teachers can all be found here

It also has additional resources like CDs, DVDs, videos and audio tapes, reference books, places to visit, websites and fiction and poetry books.

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.
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One Environment HOME PAGE

An interactive site for 9-12 year olds to learn about biodiversity and sustainability issues as they build their own environment Home Page. Complete with learning activities, teacher and student resources, up-to-date environment news and templates.
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mrod9872's comment, April 17, 2013 10:08 PM
Kemmis, Cole & Suggett (as cited in Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011) describe three curriculum orientations, defining the “critical orientation” as “based on the belief that education can help create a better society by encouraging students to identify values and practices that are unjust or unsustainable, to propose alternatives, and to take appropriate action to begin bringing those alternatives to function.” (p.51) One Environment is based on the critical knowledge that everybody belongs to one big environment: The Earth. It helps students to find out how life interacts within its many environments to discover how every person can participate in positive work for, and with, the big environment so it can sustain life now and in the future.

It is designed for school students aged 9–14 (years 5–8 in most education systems). It aims for students to learn how to think critically about the environment, how to learn the use of technology in the classroom through developing Internet literacy.

This critical approach can be seen in the design of this digital resource because it focuses students’ attention on the characteristics of environmental action as future citizens and on how individuals and groups affect the quality of environment and the well-being of people; help students learn about the diverse nature of the environment as well as the cultures, perspectives, views and actions that shape their environment; develop a sense of history, that we are a product of the past and are the basis of the future and develop responsibility for the moral, spiritual and personal growth of each individual to be a positive and active member of the larger communities to which they belong

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.
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Primary Learning - Using Bush Plants - Australian National Botanic Gardens

Primary Learning - Using Bush Plants - Australian National Botanic Gardens | Communities, Regions and Environments in Australia and in the World | Scoop.it
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mrod9872's comment, April 17, 2013 10:07 PM
Newman and Wehlage (as cited in Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011) proposed the idea of authentic learning, this type of activity focuses on active classroom learning criteria, This means that while the students are in the Gardens it is more beneficial for them to be observing, discovering and developing attitudes and values rather than reading swags of text which sometimes are disconnected with reality.

This educational program, developed by the Australian National Botanic Gardens, is meant to be used by teachers to plan an excursion, select questions and create their own activities. The program involves a guided walk and interpretive signs occur by selective plants along the way (see map included).

In the link you can find different resources (PDF) that contain all the information on the signs along with information about other important plants that occur in the Gardens. It also focuses on the Australian bush providing all the basic needs for survival of Aboriginal people for over 40,000 years, looks at aspects of the social fabric of Aboriginal society, and plant used today. It includes use of plants for food, medicine, tools, utensils, ceremonies, hunting and everyday life.

Good pre-visit and post-visit activities are important. Students can see Aboriginal artefacts on display in the Education Centre and experience the walk in the Gardens. A special artefacts kit, posters and books are available for loan from the Education Centre.

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.
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Our local threatened species: A resource for Teachers of the Cessnock and Maitland local government areas

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mrod9872's comment, April 17, 2013 10:09 PM
Gilbert & Hoepper, (2011) state that “Social and environmental studies for effective participation emphasises not only the study of important social and environmental issues, but also the development of the skills of participation so that students can do something about the issues” (p.15) This online resource aims to promote awareness of, and increase involvement in, threatened species conservation in the Lower Hunter Valley area of NSW. It promotes experiential learning in the study of local threatened species through field work and other research such as surveying, mapping and computer activities.

This teacher resource kit was produced by the NSW Department of Environment and Climate Change and its project partners, Cessnock City Council and Friends of Tumblebee. The project was funded by a Hunter-Central Rivers Catchment Management Authority Environmental Education grant. The unit of work and activity sheets were prepared by Erin Dufty, Neil Dufty and Ross Wellington of Molino Stewart Pty Ltd and reviewed by Curriculum K-12 Directorate, NSW Department of Education and Training.

It targets school students and teachers but could also be used to help develop appropriate knowledge, skills, attitudes and practices in other groups and the broader community.

The Kit was specifically designed for primary schools in the Cessnock and Maitland Local Government Areas of the Lower Hunter Valley. It could also be used by schools in other areas with reference to their own local threatened species.

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.