Location, Position and Direction
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Location, Position and Direction
ENS1.5 Compares and Contrasts natural and built features in their local area and the ways in which people interact with these features.

- Everyday day words for location, position and direction
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Bibliography

Bibliography | Location, Position and Direction | Scoop.it
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Board of Studies NSW. (1998). Syllabus Human Society and its Environment K-6. Sydney: Board of Studies.


Dufficy, P. (2010). Designing Learning for Diverse Classrooms. Newtown: Primary Engish Teaching Association .

 

Enchanted Learning. (2010). Location Words: Little Explorers Picture Dictionary. Retrieved April 22, 2013, from Enchanted Learning: http://www.enchantedlearning.com/dictionarysubjects/location.shtml.

 

Gibson, R., & Ewing, R. (2011). Transforming The Curriuclum Through The Arts. South Yarra: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). Sydney: Cengage Learning .

 

McInerney, D., & McInerney, V. (2010). Educational Psychology: Constructing Learning. Sydney: Pearson Education Australia.

 

Vygotsky, L. (2012). Thought and Language. Retrieved April 22, 2012, from Google Books: http://books.google.com.au/books?hl=en&lr=&id=B9HClB0P6d4C&oi=fnd&pg=PR4&dq=vygotsky&ots=TqKe_hk9Ko&sig=f8zSeLJLo3hNE-kAOsnEXIfgUqo

 

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Environment Excursion - Example

Environment Excursion - Example | Location, Position and Direction | Scoop.it
Explore mangroves and forests at Bicentennial Park. Wet & Dry Environments Stage 1 field trips are one of our outdoor primary school programs
Greta Barlow's insight:

Gilbert and Hoepper (2011) highlight the importance of fieldwork as students display and utilize geographical thinking skills throughout hands on exercises.  

This resource provides information for an example of a stage one excursion. It is an excursion to Sydney Olympic Park Wetlands and Forests that would be beneficial in targeting the outcomes for Stage One Environments. Students would be given the opportunity to examine a local area and the ways in which humans have interacted with this area. Gilbert and Hoepper (2011) do however identify the importance of keeping young children attentive, and thus this excursion area is only suggested for schools in the area, as a half-day excursion is more beneficial for stage one learners.

 

Teaching point – Students are to focus on describing the environment – what the location is like. Is it flat land or lots of mountains? Is it built up with buildings or is there open land? Etc. Students will be given a chance to take photographs of the location. In pairs students will also create a map of the area. With this, students must include the main types of vegetation, any man-made buildings and a key and compass.

 

Back in the classroom – Class discussion will begin and students will be encouraged to compare this environment with the environment they studied in their global task. Students should think about the similarities and differences of these environments.

Assessment – Students will be given more time to work on their excursion maps. Finished products will be laminated and displayed around the classroom.

 

Literacy link – Students will write a procedure describing how they got to the excursion. Students must remember to use location words.

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GLOBAL: A case study of Japan

GLOBAL: A case study of Japan | Location, Position and Direction | Scoop.it
Read about Japan and get information, facts, photos, videos, and more from National Geographic Kids.
Greta Barlow's insight:

The National Geographic website for children is an effective resource for teachers to teach students about other countries. Through this website, teachers can create effective and engaging case studies which would enable stage one learners to learn about natural and built environments around the world. Students would then be able to compare and contrast these environments with Australia. This case study on Japan provides facts, photos, videos and maps to create an interesting learning unit, with a global perspective. Through the use of technology, students will gain deeper understanding, knowledge and skills (McInerney & McInerney, 2010).

 

Teaching point – Locate Japan on a world map on the IWB. Through group discussion, focus on describing the location of Japan. Encourage students to think about the countries Japan is near too and its location in relation to Australia. Encourage students to use location words, for example Japan is above or north of Australia. Engage students in class discussion and create a mind map to convey ideas. It is important to further encourage students to ask geographic questions, as this will enable them to develop a deeper understanding of place and more mature geographical thinking skills (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011)

 

Group work and assessment – in groups have students look at pictures of Japan’s landscape. Some groups may be given pictures of the countryside or the city. Students must describe the location – city, mountains, lots of buildings etc. and present their location image to the class.

 

Literacy Link – Students individually write a factual description. Students must describe the landscape given to them in their group activity. 

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TES iboard: Activity - Compass Points and Simple Grid References

TES iboard: Activity - Compass Points and Simple Grid References | Location, Position and Direction | Scoop.it
Find your way in this ICT game, using compass points and grid references.
Greta Barlow's insight:

This online game teaches students about compass points, directional arrows and using simple coordinates. It encourages students to use everyday words for location, direction and position. Students will learn to depict the difference between different locations on a map, such as land and ocean. ICT is “a powerful contribution to teaching and learning” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p181)

 

Teaching idea – student’s work in pairs, taking turns. Before beginning the game, the teacher will scaffold how to navigate the boat. Remind students of the compass points, N, S, E and W and the link between the N button and the upward arrow. The teacher will then ask students to move to a particular island on the map, either by pointing to it on the IWB or by describing the point (for example the island in the top right hand corner of the map). Students must navigate to this spot without hitting the surrounding islands. This will further encourage students to think about location words.

Extension activity – introduce coordinates and ask students to identify the coordinates of particular points on the map. Students must read the vertical numbers before the horizontal letters. 

 

Numeracy and Literacy link – In pairs students play a game of battleships. Students must draw their own battleships on matching gridded paper of an island setting. Students must use directional and positional language, or use the grid coordinates, to try and sink the other person’s battleship.

 

Assessment – Students make their own treasure hunt map. Students must draw a map and give simple locational and positional directions towards finding the treasure. Students then swap maps with a partner. Students are assessed on whether their partner can find the treasure! Pairs help one another with any mistakes.

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Indigenous Interactive Map

Indigenous Interactive Map | Location, Position and Direction | Scoop.it
Greta Barlow's insight:

This Indigenous language Map is an engaging resource, when introducing Aboriginal perspective to environments. Gilbert and Hoepper (2011) identify maps as the most significant tool of a geographer, and thus it is important that students are surrounded with maps from an early age. Whilst this map is content dense and can be difficult to understand, it provides stage one learners with an overview of the size and shape of Australia, the positioning of different states and territories, as well as the many different aboriginal languages evident all over Australia. This map should only be introduced to year two students and heavy scaffolding (Vygotsky, 2012) of the lesson should take place.

 

Teaching point – The lesson will run as a whole class, with the Indigenous Language map displayed on the IWB. Begin by zooming in on the key so that they are aware of how to identify the region name. This will help with students mapping skills and understanding a map key. Zoom in on the Southeast region and encourage students to think about the regions position in Australia. What state is this region in? What ocean is it near? Can you identify an Indigenous language in that region? Introduce another aboriginal region to the students and see if they can identify the state/territory it is in. Dufficy (2010) identifies the important role of conversation between teachers and students, in helping students to understand and be engaged.

 

Literacy Link – in groups, students research one of the Aboriginal language groups in the southeast region and create an information page with pictures and writing to describe the location of the group.

Assessment – Information sheets are displayed around the room. This enables observation and informal feedback, which helps students to improve their work in the future (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011)

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Picture Book: Rosie's Walk by Pat Hutchins

When Rosie the hen sets off for a stroll around the farm, she doesn't notice a fox-shaped shadow following her. But it's only after a string of narrow escape...
Greta Barlow's insight:

Rosie’s walk is a simple picture book that focuses on positional language to navigate a hen’s journey around a farm. It is a humorous story with engaging illustrations, making it a successful resource for introducing stage one learners to position, location and direction. 

 

Teaching idea – Read ‘Rosie’s Walk’ to the class. Throughout the viewing of the text ask students questions such as “Where is the fox hiding?” and “is the fox in front or behind the hen?” These questions will encourage students to think about positioning. As a class, create a mind-map of the positional and locational words in the story, for example: around, over, past, through etc. Encourage students to think of more location words to add to the mind map. Give students some examples, such as those evident at: http://www.enchantedlearning.com/dictionarysubjects/location.shtml.

Further introduce positioning through creating a timeline together as a class on what happened first, second, third etc. in the story. These activities, as suggested by Dufficy (2010), are affective in ensuring the involvement of as many children as possible.

 

Gibson and Ewing (2011) suggests that student’s outcomes will be significantly improved in inclusive teaching and learning practices are in place. Thus it is important to have an integrated curriculum:

 

Literacy Link – Students create their own sentence describing a fish’s swim through the ocean. Students should use an everyday word for position or location in their sentence.  Students draw a picture to match their sentence, including a shark following closely behind the fish!

Assessment – Students final work will be bound together in a class book that can be displayed in the classroom, and shown on parent teacher visits.

 

Numeracy Link – Students continue to work on positioning in mathematics. Students are given a piece of paper with a large triangle in the center on the page. The teacher will call for students to draw different objects around that triangle. For example “draw a circle above the triangle” or “draw a square inside the triangle”. 

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