HSIE: Creating clean and safe environments
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People and the environment | Global Education

People and the environment | Global Education | HSIE: Creating clean and safe environments | Scoop.it
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HSIE K-6 Syllabus Outcome: ENES1 Gathers information about natural and built environments and communicates some of the ways in which they interact with, and can care for, these environments.

Subject Matter: Features, places and environments that are clean and safe.

Inquiry question: How can we interact and care for places and environments so that they are kept safe and clean?

This website is a great educational avenue which provides teachers with a variety of fantastic activities that can be used to help students understand how human activities affect our environments globally. Activity 1 presents ways in which children can visually compare different natural environments through photographs, whilst it also encourages students to show their ideas about the environment by drawing their own picture. Activity 2 on the other hand, addresses the issue by observing how the way we care for our environment alters its overall state and nature. It also offers teacher-posed questions which can be utilised as framework for discussion. Similarly, activity 3 explores how people interact with their environment and use products made from environmental parts such as trees. This activity however, can be adapted by focusing more cohesively on how human impact on numerous global environments can be reduced to not only make these cleaner and safer but also more sustainable. Such focus can be attained by creating a learning activity where students are provided with photographs of dirty, neglected environments and are asked to identify things that can be modified in order to improve it.

The different resources accessible from this site are of utter value to an educator as they help students to understand that people globally care, use and interact with their environments in different ways. These facilitate teaching and set the foundation for introducing students to the concept that “globalisation involves not just ‘what people do’ but also ‘how people think’” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.23). Further, this website provides a vast number of different, pedagogically appropriate activities on environments, which help teachers plan for effective sequential lessons and programs. This can be perceived as valuable as: “planning… gives direction to a teacher and his/her students so that all participants know the purposes and the desired destination” (Marsh, 2008, p.4).

Literacy link:
At the conclusion of the program, students can write a sentence specifying how the environment is cared for in a country of their choice. A fill in the blank passage will be provided such as: “In __________, people care for their environment by ______________.” Students sentences demonstrating different treatments of global environments can then be displayed throughout the classroom.  


References:
Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2012). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.


Marsh, C. (2008). Studies of society and environment: exploring the teaching possibilities. Frenchs Forest, N.S.W.: Pearson Education Australia.

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Sun Safe Play Everyday! - YouTube

Recommended for children ages 2 and up. Help young children understand the importance of sun protection through this fun, four minute, sing-along video. Chil...
Mariana Vazquez's insight:


HSIE K-6 Syllabus Outcome: ENES1 Gathers information about natural and built environments and communicates some of the ways in which they interact with, and can care for, these environments.

Subject Matter: Features, places and environments that are clean and safe.

Inquiry question: How can we interact and care for places and environments so that they are kept safe and clean?


“Safe, Safe Play Everyday” is an animated digital resource that can be used to educate students about how we, as our own individuals can safely interact with natural environments, in this case the playground or “outside”. The site aims to teach the audience numerous protective behaviours that should be exercised when active in this place, including the use of a hat, sunglasses and sunscreen. On the contrary, an elaboration on the consequences of unsafe sun exposure in such environments is also evidenced through the portrayal of sun burns. This two sided lesson helps students to become aware of their surroundings, as well as understand “…how the environment influences their health” (Board of Studies NSW, 2007, p.32).

From a more critical perspective, the depiction of content through the likeable Guy, and its pet Norman, coupled with the interactive song that invites the audience to participate, is an active learning strategy which is “…promoted for its effect on engaging students and improving motivation” (Gilbert& Hoepper, 2011, p.144). Early stage 1 students would thoroughly enjoy this resource, as it promotes inclusive practice which “enables all children to participate equally in the learning process…” (Groundwater-Smith, Ewing & Le Cornu, 2007, p.93). Interestingly, the video also addresses the audience as being “very smart” in an attempt to directly persuade them to safely interact with their environment. This can be seen in Guy’s closing statement: “Norman and I think you are very smart, smart kids wear sunscreen, sunglasses and hats”.

Numeracy strategy and assessment link:
The incorporation of comparatives such as: “the sun is bigger than an elephant” introduces students to the topic of Area, establishing clear cross-curriculum links to Mathematics. To follow up, a numeracy strategy that could be implemented would be to instruct students to observe five different places within the school grounds and compare these areas using everyday language. Students can then give reasons for their answers and order these from smallest to largest, an activity that is compliant with the Early Stage one outcome Mae-10MG and can also be used as a form of assessment. 

References:

Board of Studies New South Wales. (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K – 6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies New South Wales.

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2012). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

Groundwater-Smith, S., Ewing, R., & Le Cornu, R. (2007). Teaching: challenges and dilemmas (3rd e.d.). South Melbourne, Victoria: Thomson.

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Teach Kids to Go Green: Picture Book: Kids Fun: Recycling - YouTube

http://www.littlepicklepress.com Green sustainable storybook about conservation, Protect the earth's precious resources in the eco picture book of the year f...
Mariana Vazquez's insight:


HSIE K-6 Syllabus Outcome: ENES1 Gathers information about natural and built environments and communicates some of the ways in which they interact with, and can care for, these environments.

Subject Matter: Features, places and environments that are clean and safe.

Inquiry question: How can we interact and care for places and environments so that they are kept safe and clean?

“What Does It Mean To be Green?” is an example of quality literature written by Rana DiOrio for young children of ages four to seven. Through this digital interpretation of the story by “Little Pickle Press”, students can be effectively introduced to the topic of environments and what it means for us “to be green”.

This digital resource begins by asking numerous ‘thinking’ and ‘inferring’ questions which enable students to think in the appropriate context. It incorporates the use of humour and appealing visuals to activate schemas and prompt students to consider whether the proposed representations of “being green” are accurate. Such an exploration of the topic is important as “when we read we need to consider both the context within which a text was written and the purpose for which it was written” (Winch, 2010, p.29), a cognitive process that this resource aims to stimulate with the young audience.

Another educational aspect of the story can be evidenced through the provision of real life examples, which insinuate ways in which children themselves can care for the environment and “protect Earth’s precious resources” (DiOrio, 2010, p.26) by reusing and reducing. These are portrayed in a fun, age relevant manner through the use of cartoons, providing students with “opportunities… to become more aware of…their surroundings” (Board of Studies N.S.W., 2007, p.47) and more aware of how they can adequately interact with these. This resource is thus utterly valuable as it instils in students a sense of ownership over their environment, a quality that develops “when classrooms connect with the real world in which children live their lives” (Green, 2006, p.238).


Assessment:  
Students’ learning can be assessed by pre-recording clips of cartoons performing actions introduced in the book. An example could be a cartoon switching and leaving the light on in a room they are not occupying. Students will then need to identify only positive, caring behaviours by writing down the number of the clip that positively impacts our environment. Upon completion, the clips can be shown again but this time the class can respond as a group by moving to the right side of the room if the clip shows positive behaviours and moving to the left side of the room if the behaviour portrayed is negative.


References:

Board of Studies New South Wales. (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K – 6  Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies New South Wales.

 

DiOrio, R. (2010). What Does It Mean To be Green? San Francisco, California: Little Pickle

Press.

Green, D. (2006). So what should my classroom look like? In R. Campbell & D. Green (Eds.), Literacies and learners: current perspectives. Frenchs Forest, N.S.W.: Pearson Education Australia.   

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy: Reading, Writing and Children’s Literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

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Relationships to country: Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islander people

Mariana Vazquez's insight:


HSIE K-6 Syllabus Outcome: ENES1 Gathers information about natural and built environments and communicates some of the ways in which they interact with, and can care for, these environments.

Subject Matter: Features, places and environments that are clean and safe.

Inquiry question: How can we interact and care for places and environments so that they are kept safe and clean?

This document is a reliable and highly useful teacher resource which is informative yet succinct and easy for the reader to comprehend. It is authentic, accurate and includes Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participation, acknowledging “the diversity of Aboriginal cultures” (NSW Department of Education and Training, Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate, 2003, p. 15). These qualities make this document compliant with the selection criteria outlined in the Selection Criteria for the Evaluation of Aboriginal Studies and Torres Strait Islander Studies (2003). 

“Relationships to country” is a great learning tool for a teacher which aims to broaden their understanding of the relationship that is shared between Indigenous people and the environment. Through engaging with this text, educators can begin to conceptualise the meaning and significance of “country” as well as become aware of the reasons why Indigenous people interact with the environment the way they do and the purpose behind their actions. This resource is a strong introduction which has the potential to facilitate the process of incorporating an Indigenous perspective into teaching about environments, as teachers “… begin to understand that many Aboriginal people see themselves as an effect of the land rather than a controller or manipulator of it”, (Harrison, 2011, p.19).

As numerous research findings show “…many primary teachers openly admit that they know nothing about Aboriginal people…” (Harrison, 2011, p.18). This is a prime reason as to why such a resource can be intellectually enriching for educators as it gives them a valid representation of the Indigenous culture. Attaining such knowledge is substantially important as it helps teachers to avoid using misleading information when incorporating Aboriginal perspectives in their teaching practices, thus teaching students culturally and pedagogically appropriate content.

Teaching idea:
As a class, students can create a Venn diagram that illustrates the similarities and differences between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people’s interaction with their environment. Teachers should model an example to stimulate student’s thinking and promote cognitive engagement.

 

References:
Harrison, N. (2011). Teaching and Learning in Aboriginal Education. Second Edition. Victoria: Oxford University Press.

N.S.W. Department of Education and Training, Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate. (2003). Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide. Retrieved March 28, 2014 from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/assets/pdf/aboriginalresourceguide.pdf

 

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Enviro-Tip "Recycling" - YouTube

Rae Rae teaches us all about the value and importance of recycling in this Enviropals! Enviro-Tip!
Mariana Vazquez's insight:


HSIE K-6 Syllabus Outcome: ENES1 Gathers information about natural and built environments and communicates some of the ways in which they interact with, and can care for, these environments.

Subject Matter: Features, places and environments that are clean and safe.

Inquiry question: How can we interact and care for places and environments so that they are kept safe and clean?

Scaffolding is an integral part of teaching a new concept and this resource delivers just that. This video produced by Enviropals1, is a great educational tool which facilitates learning about “recycling”. It does so by first defining the topic, then imposing questions to the students about what they think they can recycle and lastly, it prompts them further by providing specific examples on how they can care for our environment through the recycling of plastic, paper and glass.

Teachers can use this as a basis for a school lesson or excursion within their local community. They can first “provide opportunities for students to engage with geographical tools” (Board of Studies NSW, 2007, p.47) by presenting a map of the school or a simple map of their local community and together selecting an area they would like to investigate. Students (wearing gloves), can then be divided into two groups and assigned two separate working areas within the chosen location. Here students will be asked to collect as much rubbish as possible with the purpose of creating a safer and cleaner place. Upon finishing, students can classify their items into two categories, either paper or plastic. As a class, students can then review each group’s choices and conclude by disposing of these items appropriately. A lesson such as this “provides opportunities for students to have direct experiences with their immediate environment” (Board of Studies NSW, 2007, p.47), which is effective as it engages students through kinaesthetic learning. Additionally, students experiencing this first-hand will motivate them to replicate the taught conduct outside school grounds.

Link to Mathematics:
From a teaching perspective, this activity is also useful as it links to other Key Learning Areas such as Mathematics, through the outcome Mae-17SP where students “group objects according to characteristics…” (Board of Studies NSW, 2012, p.66).

Assessment:
In terms of assessment, the extent of students’ learning can be appraised by creating a worksheet displaying ten different objects and the three recycling bins of: plastic, paper or glass. The students’ task will be to first circle ‘yes’ or ‘no’ in response to whether the object can be recycled and then match the recyclable objects to the picture of their respective bin.  
 
References:

Board of Studies New South Wales. (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K – 6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies New South Wales.
 

Board of Studies New South Wales. (2012). Mathematics K – 10 Syllabus Volume 1. Sydney: Board of Studies New South Wales.

 

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