Environment Wildlife Conservation
226 views | +0 today
Follow
Environment Wildlife Conservation
I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. I did not wish to live what was not life, living is so dear; nor did I wish to practise resignation, unless it was quite necessary. I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rout all that was not life, to cut a broad swath and shave close, to drive life into a corner, and reduce it to its lowest terms, and, if it proved to be mean, why then to get the whole and genuine meanness of it, and publish its meanness to the world; or if it were sublime, to know it by experience, and be able to give a true account of it in my next excursion. <br>From Walden Chapter 2 “Where I Lived, and What I Lived For”
Curated by LilyGiraud
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

Why Trump Can't Make Coal Great Again

Why Trump Can't Make Coal Great Again | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
Long-term market forces will keep miners from getting their jobs back. But Trump could slow the decline of coal—and the rise of renewables.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

Brazilian Free-Tailed Bat is Fastest Flying Animal, New Study Says | Biology | Sci-News.com

Brazilian Free-Tailed Bat is Fastest Flying Animal, New Study Says | Biology | Sci-News.com | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
A study published in the journal Royal Society Open Science shows that the Brazilian free-tailed bat can achieve flight speeds of 100 mph (160 km per hour).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

Physics Doesn't Care Who Was Elected President

Physics Doesn't Care Who Was Elected President | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
Eight worrisome climate patterns are well underway, regardless of politics
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

If you thought 2015 was hot, just wait

If you thought 2015 was hot, just wait | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
The record-setting global temperatures seen in 2015 could be the “new normal” as soon as the 2020s.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

Climate change could flip Mediterranean lands to desert

Climate change could flip Mediterranean lands to desert | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
Warming beyond 2 ºC could send the region's forests moving north, and cause extensive drying.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

Atlantic monument is home to unique and varied creatures

Atlantic monument is home to unique and varied creatures | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
A region of ocean off the coast of Cape Cod has become the first U.S. marine national monument in the Atlantic Ocean.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

Why Honey Bees Are Crucial Employees at this Airport  Smithsonian

Why Honey Bees Are Crucial Employees at this Airport  Smithsonian | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
Empty description
LilyGiraud's insight:
A colony of almost 300,000 honey bees lives just south of Frankfurt Airport. By testing the quality of their honey, scientists can determine the pollution levels in that area
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

Can Chemists Turn Pollution into Gold?

Can Chemists Turn Pollution into Gold? | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
Scientists are trying to convert carbon dioxide emissions into something of value—without using too much energy
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

This futuristic 'vertical village' is like a jungle stretching 36 storeys into the sky

This futuristic 'vertical village' is like a jungle stretching 36 storeys into the sky | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
Pack your bags, we’re moving.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

World's richest tenth produce half carbon emissions, poorest half one tenth: Oxfam

World's richest tenth produce half carbon emissions, poorest half one tenth: Oxfam | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
The richest tenth of the world's people produce half of all carbon emissions, while the poorest half - most threatened by droughts and super storms linked to climate change - produce only one tenth, Oxfam said on Wednesday.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

11 of Britain's most legendary trees

11 of Britain's most legendary trees | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
Will the saplings we plant during National Tree Week’s 40th anniversary grow to have such amazing stories to tell as these magnificent specimens?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

Protecting songbirds by Better Understanding their Migratory connectivity

Protecting songbirds by Better Understanding their Migratory connectivity | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

Antarctica Ice Shelf is Breaking from the Inside Out

Antarctica Ice Shelf is Breaking from the Inside Out | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
The connected ice sheet could retreat even quicker in the future
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

The Arctic Is Seriously Weird Right Now

The Arctic Is Seriously Weird Right Now | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
Instead of expanding during this cold, dark time of year, sea ice is shrinking
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

Physics Doesn't Care Who Was Elected President

Physics Doesn't Care Who Was Elected President | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
Eight worrisome climate patterns are well underway, regardless of politics
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

CO2-loving plants can counter human emissions

CO2-loving plants can counter human emissions | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
Plants temporarily halted the acceleration of rising carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere, new research suggests.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

World wildlife 'falls by 58% in 40 years' - BBC News

World wildlife 'falls by 58% in 40 years' - BBC News | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
Global wildlife populations have fallen by 58% since 1970, according to a biodiversity report.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

Climate Change Is Accelerating Permafrost Thawing. And It’s Destroying Arctic Cities.

Climate Change Is Accelerating Permafrost Thawing. And It’s Destroying Arctic Cities. | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
As climate change accelerates permafrost thawing, what can be done to maintain the resource-rich hubs Russia relies on?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

Sea Urchins Pull Themselves Inside Out to be Reborn | Deep Look

Conceived in the open sea, tiny spaceship-shaped sea urchin larvae search the vast ocean to find a home. After this incredible odyssey, they undergo one o
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

Historical Records Miss a Fifth of Global Warming: NASA

Historical Records Miss a Fifth of Global Warming: NASA | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
A new NASA-led study finds that almost one-fifth of the global warming that has occurred in the past 150 years has been missed by historical records due to quirks in how global temperatures were recorded.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

Scientists warn 21% of plants at risk of extinction - BBC News

Scientists warn 21% of plants at risk of extinction - BBC News | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
Scientists have published their first global assessment of the state of the world's plants.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by LilyGiraud from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Asteroid impact helped create the birds we know today

Asteroid impact helped create the birds we know today | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it

Modern birds originated in Southern Hemisphere about 95 million years ago.

 

Modern birds, a group called Neornithes are the most diverse and widespread vertebrates on Earth today. Previous studies that used only information from genetic analyses of current species have suggested that birds arose anywhere from 72 million to 170 million years ago. But the new study, which includes anatomical data extinct species preserved in the fossil record, narrows that window considerably, says Joel Cracraft, an ornithologist at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.

 

He and museum colleague Santiago Claramunt, also an ornithologist, didn’t include well-known ancient birds such as Archaeopteryx and Confuciusornis, which belonged to lineages that eventually died out. They only looked at species that belonged to the three major groups of birds alive today: Palaeognathae (ostriches and their close relatives), Galloanseres (waterfowl, pheasants, and their close kin), and Neoaves (all other birds).

 

The team’s genetic information came from analyses of two particular genes from 230 species representing all major subgroups of modern birds. (Mutations in those genes, which are related to basic biochemical processes that take place in all cells, helped the researchers estimate when those groups arose or diverged from their closest relatives, Cracraft says.) Anatomical data from 130 extinct species that had once lived worldwide helped the team figure out when and where those groups originated, as well as how quickly they evolved.

 

The results suggest that the last common ancestor of all modern birds—in other words, the species at the base of the evolutionary family tree that includes all living bird species—lived in West Gondwana, a landmass that included what are now fragments of South America and large portions of Antarctica, about 95 million years ago. What’s more, all three major groups—Palaeognathae, Galloanseres, and Neoaves—had already arisen by the time the dino-killing asteroid smacked our planet 66 million years ago, the researchers report online today inScience Advances. So although the resulting die-offs may not have triggered the original diversification of birds, by eliminating many ecological competitors, the extinction provided opportunities for survivors to diversify and spread, Cracraft says.

 

In eras since the asteroid impact, changes in global climate significantly affected how quickly new species evolved, the researchers found. When global climate cooled, areas experiencing what are today considered tropical conditions shrank back toward the equator, and the net rate of species appearance (the number of new species that evolved minus the number that went extinct) increased. When global warmth returned, those newly minted species could then spread worldwide—as long as they didn’t run into gaps between continents too big for them to fly across. Birds stuck on landmasses that had drifted into isolation due to the long-term movement of Earth's tectonic plates, such as Australia and New Zealand, were consigned to evolve in isolation.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

World's richest tenth produce half carbon emissions, poorest half one tenth: Oxfam

World's richest tenth produce half carbon emissions, poorest half one tenth: Oxfam | Environment Wildlife Conservation | Scoop.it
The richest tenth of the world's people produce half of all carbon emissions, while the poorest half - most threatened by droughts and super storms linked to climate change - produce only one tenth, Oxfam said on Wednesday.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LilyGiraud
Scoop.it!

NOVA | Evolution: The Evolution Of Skin - Discovey History Science Documentary HD

NOVA | Evolution: The Evolution Of Skin - Discovey History Science Documentary HD Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWd9r8-8HJVHmDESq_Xob6w?sub_con...
more...
No comment yet.