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Climate Change to Cause 'Massive' Ocean Damage by 2100 | Environment News Service

Climate Change to Cause 'Massive' Ocean Damage by 2100 | Environment News Service | Environmental Science | Scoop.it
HONOLULU, Hawaii, October 18, 2013 (ENS) - By the year 2100, about 98 percent of the oceans will be affected by acidification, warming temperatures, low oxygen, or lack of biological productivity, and most areas will be hit by a multitude of these...
Eiley Tarlton's insight:

This article talks about how in 2100, about 98% of the oceans will be affected by acidification, warming temperatures, low oxygen, or lach of biological productivity. This means that not only the marine life in these oceans will also be affected, but also humans. This article states that at least 400 million of the world's poorest people heavily rely on the oceans. 

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How Fishing Gear is Killing Whales in the North Atlantic by Rebecca Kessler: Yale Environment 360

How Fishing Gear is Killing Whales in the North Atlantic by Rebecca Kessler: Yale Environment 360 | Environmental Science | Scoop.it
Researchers have been documenting the deadly threat that fishing lines and ropes pose to large whales that become entangled in them.
Eiley Tarlton's insight:

This article is about the danger of fishing lines to wales. It talks about how wales can get tangled in fishing lines and even if they break free, whether on it's own or many times requires human intervension, many times they take part of the fishing line with them. If this happens the fishing line can cause great damage to the wale. It can cut the wale and deform it's bone, and it was estimated that once a wale has been entangled, it has about six months for the wale to die. The article states the this is not an uncommon occurance, and that more than half of the wales between Cape Cod and Nova Scotia have been entangled in fishing lines at least once. The article also posses the idea of euthenasia of wales that are fatally entangled in fishing gear. 

 

I would recommend this article because I think that since wales are so large, it is hard to believe that something like a fishing line, which is so small in comparison to a wale, can kill it. I think that many people are not only unaware of this, but also unaware of how often wales get tangled in fishing lines. 

 

I thought that this article was very interesting because I learnt how dagerous something as small as fishing gear can be to something as massive as a wale.

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The Year the Monarch Didn’t Appear

The Year the Monarch Didn’t Appear | Environmental Science | Scoop.it
The precipitous loss of native vegetation across the United States has led to a dramatic decline of insect populations.
Eiley Tarlton's insight:

This article is about how the populations of many insects is rapidly declining. This article focuses mainly on the monarch butterfly and bees. The article says that one of the main causes is the loss of vegitation in the US. Many pesticides are used on crops that are seriously dangerous to insects. One pesticide that used to be common contains nicotine, and is very toxic and damaging to bees. Another pesticide problem is that pesticides are being used on crops to kill all vegitation except the crops that have been genetically altered to withstand the pesticide. A result is that many acers of milkweed, which is vital for monarch butterfly larve, has been wiped out. Another problem is the destroying of these insects habitats to build parking lots, roads, and buildings. This article also explains how vital insects are to our survival.

 

I would recomend this article because it reminds us how important insects are to us and that although we can not survive without them insects, we are causing their populations to decrease. I think that because we see insects almost everywhere, we do not think that they could be at risk for becoming extenct.

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