Environmental Science
0 view | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Dominique Montiel
Scoop.it!

Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News: Iroko trees, the new warrior for climate change

Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News: Iroko trees, the new warrior for climate change | Environmental Science | Scoop.it
Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News
Dominique Montiel's insight:

This article is concerned with Iroko trees' potential to reduce C02 levels in the atmosphere. Basically, a limestone-creating process native to this type of tree absorbs C02 and decomposes it to combine it with other elements and create the fertilizing limestone. I would definately recommend this article to most people who are skeptical about finding solutions to global warming; it is trully incredible how trees or other things that sorround us daily could hold the answer to restoring our Earth's wellbeing. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dominique Montiel from Sustain Our Earth
Scoop.it!

Metro cities bracing for rising tides

Metro cities bracing for rising tides | Environmental Science | Scoop.it

Over the next century, Vancouver's greatest asset could become its worst enemy.

 

From raising dikes to 'retreating' from flood-threatened land, low-lying communities face costly and uncertain future due to climate change.  

 

 


Via SustainOurEarth
Dominique Montiel's insight:

This article expands on the damages that rising tides will have on big coastal cities, Vancouver in particular. It specifies that damages from flooding and high waters are estimated to cost up to a trillion dollars. Nevertheless, cities are beggining to take measures in preparing for this destruction. I would recommend this article to a small extent because although it does provide interesting facts and details it fails to go into the matter of the subject, or a general idea about rising tides. Personally, I gathered from the article that although coastal cities are most prone to being affected by the first waves of rising waters, the cities that will suffer the most are the developing ones because of their lack of preparation.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Montiel
Scoop.it!

Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News: Climate change signals a whale of a shift in feeding patterns

Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News: Climate change signals a whale of a shift in feeding patterns | Environmental Science | Scoop.it
Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News
Dominique Montiel's insight:

This article makes a thorough analysis of the progressive decrease of Right Whale sightings in Nova Scotia, their usual hangout. Scientists attribute this change of setting to the diminishing of plankton species (what these whales usually feed on) in the area. The community of Right Whales however, is not decreasing, they are only shifting paths and feeding spots due to numerous factors, one of them being change in sea temperature or global warming. I would not necessarily recommend this article because it is a very specific issue in a very specific place, so it might not be of interest to the general public. Nevertheless, it was definately enjoyable and interesting to read.-

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Montiel
Scoop.it!

Rising Waters: How Fast and How Far Will Sea Levels Rise? by Nicola Jones: Yale Environment 360

Rising Waters: How Fast and How Far Will Sea Levels Rise? by Nicola Jones: Yale Environment 360 | Environmental Science | Scoop.it
Although the latest U.N. climate report significantly increases its projections for sea level rise this century, some scientists warn even those estimates are overly conservative.
Dominique Montiel's insight:

The main points adressed by the article tackle the  velocity and causes of rising waters. Basically, Jones gives a thorough exposition of the different sources of this phenomena: melting glaciers, Greenland, the poles, etc. She also discussed the innacuracy that scientists experience when trying to predict future water level increase because of the spontaneity of the ocean. It was definately an interesting and well thought article; I would recommend it to most people because it talks about an issue that is imperative to become educated about. Personally, the predictions and numbers given in the piece scared me and made me reflect on how we humans are affecting ourselves by undermining our world.

more...
No comment yet.