Environmental Justice
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Growing Power scores $5 million to feed our nation's hungriest cities ...

Growing Power scores $5 million to feed our nation's hungriest cities ... | Environmental Justice | Scoop.it
Food-justice organization Growing Power — with its now-iconic greenhouses, composting worms, fishponds, and multiple generations of graduates — is well known as a model worth replicating. Now, Growing Power has ...

Via Jim Hall
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

With the constant barrage of information about starving nations around the world, it's easy to forget those who are starving in our own nation. This article is definitely an interesting read--and gives me hope for our future in solving hunger in America. -T

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What's wrong with our food system: Birke Baehr at TEDxNextGenerationAsheville - YouTube

Birke Baehr -"what's Wrong With Our Food System? And How Can We Make A Difference?" www.tedxnextgenerationasheville.com/ Video by: Twin Path Productions www....
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

Brike Baehr is only 11 years old but is able to present some of the most striking problems in our food system. His perspective is not downplayed by his age, but enhanced but it. What really stuck with me: "Now a while back, I wanted to be an NFL football player. I decided that I'd rather be an organic farmer instead." What a cutie. -T

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Apple's iCloud reigning over the greenest data centers on the planet - Apple Insider

Apple's iCloud reigning over the greenest data centers on the planet - Apple Insider | Environmental Justice | Scoop.it
Apple Insider
Apple's iCloud reigning over the greenest data centers on the planet
Apple Insider
Data centers are notorious power hogs.

Via Carla Gentry CSPO
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

Think all your emails and photos uploaded online are simply stored in the "cloud," virtually taking up no space whatsoever? Think twice. 

 

Information on the internet is actually stored in "data centers" that not only require magnificent amounts of energy to power but also a powerful cooling system to keep all the energy generators from overheating. 

 

In the above article Apple makes moves toward innovating the environmentally sound direction by making it's data centers "LEED Certified."

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Carla Gentry CSPO's curator insight, March 25, 2013 9:51 AM

Data centers are notorious power hogs. Essentially warehouses packed with stacks of servers (pictured above), Apple's facilities support billions of electronic transactions every day, requiring massive processing power. Densely packed racks of servers in vast buildings (pictured below) can consume as much electricity as a small town

Cassie May's comment, June 11, 2014 9:50 PM
I think this is super important because we read that article in Econ last term about how much power and energy the servers take up that run the cloud. So it sometimes leaves a false sense of pride about saving the environment if we think we are saving energy by storing things in the cloud, when in reality it wasn't saving much.
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Ending Food Deserts? | Environmental and Food Justice

(SEATTLE, WA) The food justice movement has long recognized the centrality of the food desert as a threat to the health and well being of inner city communities. Eradicating food deserts has preoccupied movement activists ...


Via Elizabeth Rugg
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

This is a very cool idea - bringing the "food truck movement" that we see in cities to urban food deserts. Mobilizing food so that everyone has access (in some ways the core of "food justice") is extremely important, especially now that urban food deserts become more of a reality with diminishing resources. What I wonder though is how these mobile food markets are funded and how they could be more environmentally friendly (food trucks use a lot of fossil fuels). 

-T

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Amy Argenal's comment, May 28, 2014 1:11 AM
Great questions!
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Food Studies: Who’s doing the judging in the food justice movement?

Food Studies: Who’s doing the judging in the food justice movement? | Environmental Justice | Scoop.it
Being an advocate for food justice sounds good -- but can you actually explain what that means?

Via RuthHoward
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

As I do more research about "food justice," I'm confronted with this same dilemma: the inability to even define food justice. I use the term "food justice" a lot, but if someone asked me to explain exactly what it means, I don't think I would be confident in my definition. So what is "food justice"? Equal access to healthy food? Social justice related to the food system? The right to grow, sell, and eat healthy food? 

-T

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Tessa and Sigi's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:02 PM

As I do more research about "food justice," I'm confronted with this same dilemma: the inability to even define food justice. I use the term "food justice" a lot, but if someone asked me to explain exactly what it means, I don't think I would be confident in my definition. So what is "food justice"? Equal access to healthy food? Social justice related to the food system? The right to grow, sell, and eat healthy food? 

-T

Amy Argenal's comment, May 28, 2014 1:13 AM
Again, really great questions that you raise!
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Michael Pollan speaks at City Arts and Lectures

Michael Pollan speaks at City Arts and Lectures | Environmental Justice | Scoop.it
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

On May 1 at City Arts and Lectures in San Francisco, Michael Pollan gave a lecture on The Omnivore’s Solution: In Defense of Food. He spoke about the complications with America's food system and brought with him two grocery bags chock-full of common food choices at today's supermarkets. He had a lot of interesting (and funny!) things to say, and he made me question my food choices. Like should we really be eating drinks called Neurogasm? Is that even natural? However, his lecture was clearly aimed for upper/middle class people. After all, one of the mantras he gave was "Eat less, pay more." 

-T

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Amy Argenal's comment, May 28, 2014 1:18 AM
Great critique, Tessa! This really speaks to the social justice aspect of food justice. What is affordable to what communities? Do all communities have access to healthy foods?
Sam and Phoebe's comment, June 5, 2014 4:16 PM
I listened to this on the radio as it was happening. I mean obviously he doesn't have anyone below a certain income level on his radar, but I actually enjoyed what he had to say about food--that trusting tradition and such is much better than the various food trends (low carbs, now high fat.)
Amy Argenal's comment, June 5, 2014 5:48 PM
Don't forget to sign off.....
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Michael Pollan: Supermarket Secrets - YouTube

Visit http://nourishlife.org. How do you make healthy choices at the supermarket? Food journalist Michael Pollan helps us navigate the grocery store to find ...
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

Michael Pollan shows how the food industry and supermarkets have become huge money-hungry franchises. In the eyes of food industries, it has become less about healthiness and sustainability and more about what will make the greatest profit. Cheaply mass-produced food has taken over. For our health and for our environment, we need to start shopping smart. 

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Amy Argenal's comment, May 7, 2014 1:21 PM
Scary! Also remember to sign off so I know if this is Tessa or Sigi!
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How the sustainable foods market went mainstream

How the sustainable foods market went mainstream | Environmental Justice | Scoop.it
Here's how companies such as Whole Foods and Honest Tea brought organic, local products from the fringes to the masses. Welcome to the "Purpose Economy."

Via Whitney Williams
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

Sustainable "organic" food has become a luxury. It's a booming business, but only within certain communities: the communities that can afford it. Food that is produced in an environmentally friendly manner costs more, limiting its access to the general public. So the big question becomes: how can sustainable organic food become mass produced and cheaper so everyone is able to access it? Is such a concept impossible? 

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Whitney Williams's curator insight, April 4, 2014 1:32 PM

I worked for Honest Tea last year. They definitely are inspiring and dedicated to their mission.

Amy Argenal's comment, May 7, 2014 1:23 PM
Great question!
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Threat from global warming heightened in latest U.N. report

Threat from global warming heightened in latest U.N. report | Environmental Justice | Scoop.it
YOKOHAMA, Japan (Reuters) - Global warming poses a growing threat to the health, economic prospects, and food and water sources of billions of people, top scientists said in a report that urges swift action
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

Sad to think that environmental degradation and climate changeare related to and sometimes causes social injustices, as members on the lower end of the socio economic spectrum experience the brute end of climate change. 

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Amy Argenal's comment, May 7, 2014 1:24 PM
A very needed perspective to include! Remember to sign off!
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New Report Reveals a Bee-Killing Pesticide is Mostly Unnecessary

New Report Reveals a Bee-Killing Pesticide is Mostly Unnecessary | Environmental Justice | Scoop.it
A new scientific review reveals that bee-killing neonicotinoid pesticide seed treatments do not increase crop yields and cause widespread environmental and economic damage.

Via Organic Connections
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

Bees are a keystone species that have important roles in maintaining biodiversity.

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‘16 Seeds’ – documentary about food justice in the black community — City Farmer News

‘16 Seeds’ – documentary about food justice in the black community — City Farmer News | Environmental Justice | Scoop.it
‘16 Seeds’ – documentary about food justice in the black community: Gail, Mia, and Mickey, ... http://t.co/gVRispAy http://t.co/9ICOhKF8

Via Jen-ai
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

It's always important to look at food justice in different communities because of the effect institutionalized racism and class divisions have on the food system. These effects are often subtle, so a documentary that brings light to them is of significant value, especially when trying to change the system. -T 

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Freakonomics » The Inefficiency of Local Food

Freakonomics » The Inefficiency of Local Food | Environmental Justice | Scoop.it
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

Wow. This article really makes you think. I've come to believe that local food is the best choice to support local businesses and help the environment, but Freaknomoics give a different perspective. This quote especially stood out to me: "a locavore-like production system would require an additional 60 million acres of cropland, 2.7 million tons more fertilizer, and 50 million pounds more chemicals."

-T

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Why Whole Foods Is Scoring Big Points in Detroit

Why Whole Foods Is Scoring Big Points in Detroit | Environmental Justice | Scoop.it
Food justice activists worried that Whole Foods could jeopardize local businesses teamed up with the company to work on solutions.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

I personally am a fan of Whole Foods, but I've seen its negative impacts on local grocers and I've heard rumors than many of their "healthy" foods are no better than what you could find at Safeway, but double the price. When the Whole Foods in the Haight-Ashbury opened, I saw firsthand the effect it had on the neighboring markets, such as the Haight Street Market and Real Foods, both located in the same general area. This article gives me a little more hope about Whole Foods' initiatives... however, it's hard to say if the benefit of adding a Whole Foods into a neighborhood is actually valuable to the community. 

-T

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Katie's comment, June 8, 2014 12:40 AM
I like Whole Foods too but I worry that people become too comfortable when they shop at there. They think they are doing all they can to help the environment by supporting Whole Foods but in reality the store has some things to work on and it is way overpriced. Its also a social issue because so many people cannot afford Whole Foods. I like to call it "Whole Paycheck"
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Food Studies: Who’s doing the judging in the food justice movement?

Food Studies: Who’s doing the judging in the food justice movement? | Environmental Justice | Scoop.it
Being an advocate for food justice sounds good -- but can you actually explain what that means?

Via RuthHoward
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

As I do more research about "food justice," I'm confronted with this same dilemma: the inability to even define food justice. I use the term "food justice" a lot, but if someone asked me to explain exactly what it means, I don't think I would be confident in my definition. So what is "food justice"? Equal access to healthy food? Social justice related to the food system? The right to grow, sell, and eat healthy food? 

-T

more...
Tessa and Sigi's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:02 PM

As I do more research about "food justice," I'm confronted with this same dilemma: the inability to even define food justice. I use the term "food justice" a lot, but if someone asked me to explain exactly what it means, I don't think I would be confident in my definition. So what is "food justice"? Equal access to healthy food? Social justice related to the food system? The right to grow, sell, and eat healthy food? 

-T

Amy Argenal's comment, May 28, 2014 1:13 AM
Again, really great questions that you raise!
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Food Justice: Connecting Farm to Community

Food Justice: Connecting Farm to Community | Environmental Justice | Scoop.it
Just Food in New York City is nimbly doing just what its name suggests: building food justice.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

Access and affordability make it difficult for many people to eat well. Just Food in NYC connects farms to cities, allowing everyone, no matter their income level, an opportunity to eat healthy local food. Not only do those who buy the food benefit, but the farmers do as well. 

-T

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Amy Argenal's comment, May 28, 2014 1:16 AM
I love the examples of positive actors! You should check out something on people's grocery in Oakland. They do a lot of really cool stuff as well.
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Draft letter from EPA advisors urges tougher ozone standard

A draft letter from a U.S. EPA science advisory committee recommends a tight standard for how much ozone pollution can be in the air, recommending that the lower bound of the standard should be 60 parts per billion, much lower than the current standard. But the letter notes that committee members haven't made a decision on the upper bound of the ozone standard.

Via Todd Weaver
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

"To be sure, the letter has yet to be reviewed or approved by the overall committee, doesn't represent EPA policy and could change. But it's a sign that EPA may lower the current standard of 75 ppb, which could lead to both cleaner air for millions of Americans but also billions of dollars in extra costs for industry and added headaches for some states that already find it difficult to meet the current standard." - Although "going green" cost money, it's the cost of survival. Corporate organizations and manufacturing companies should already be held responsible for their environmentally detrimental externalities. 

 

"The CASAC concurs that 60 ppb is an appropriate and justifiable scientifically based lower bound for a revised primary standard." - At the same time its going to take  time and a lot of effort to lower CO2's ppb given coorporate resistance expensive innovations around environmentally sound ways of production. 

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Amy Argenal's comment, May 28, 2014 1:22 AM
S- don't forget to sign at the bottom :). Also, you bring up some great points. Check out this article about dredging canals in Louisiana http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/louisianas-coastline-shrinks-political-fight-responsibility-grows/.
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7 secrets for healthful hospital food, from asparagus to tomatoes

7 secrets for healthful hospital food, from asparagus to tomatoes | Environmental Justice | Scoop.it
Here's how a Michigan farmer's daughter is leading the way to connect local food growers with hospitals for better food in healthcare.

Via Whitney Williams
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

Hospital food is probably some of the worst food ever. In taste. In environmental sustainability. In healthiness. It's an overall terrible option. And it's the food that's served to sick people and their families. Crazy, huh? This article takes a look at how healthy food can be implemented in hospitals. 

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Amy Argenal's comment, May 7, 2014 1:29 PM
You should look up about Kaiser. I know that in the Kaiser Oakland hospital they have photos of healthy food and a farmers market on Wednesdays. I wonder if they are just preaching or if their food is actually healthy.
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Eight major UK renewable energy projects receive government backing

Eight major UK renewable energy projects receive government backing | Environmental Justice | Scoop.it
Five offshore windfarms and three biomass projects will provide millions of homes with clean power

Via HealthSafety
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

This article touches on innovations in sustainable energy in the UK. The proposed idea is a installation project of offshore windfarms to produce clean energy, and in turn, bring about "8,500 jobs and 4.5GW" of electricity capacity to the UK. 

 

Although the article states that household electricity bills will grow by 2% y 2020, the article also states that in the long run household electricity bills will experience a drop. The offshore windfarm project is is far more pricey than an onshore windfarm project however, the investment pays off in the long run as the UK enters the realm of clean, sustainable energy. 

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Amy Argenal's comment, May 7, 2014 1:27 PM
Good to include positive examples!
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'Tower of David' Venezuela: the world's tallest slum in incredible images

'Tower of David' Venezuela: the world's tallest slum in incredible images | Environmental Justice | Scoop.it
Once a five-star hotel and luxury apartment block, the 45-storey so-called “Tower of David” skyscraper that looms over the Venezuelan capital of Caracas is now home to 3,000 people, and thought to be the world’s tallest slum.

Via geographil
Tessa and Sigi's insight:

This article doesn't necessarily address environmental justice but it is an interesting read on poverty in Venezuela and the "Tower of David".

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Amy Argenal's comment, May 7, 2014 1:25 PM
This can connect if you think of where people live and how socio-economic status affects the environment. You spoke to this in one of your later posts.
Katie's comment, June 8, 2014 12:37 AM
This documentary (http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/revolutionary-optimists/) is totally related to this. It is about a man in Indian slums who has empowered children through education and helped them realize their potential to advocate for their right to have clean water.