Entretiens Professionnels
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Entretiens Professionnels
promouvoir des moments d'échanges personnalisés dans un contexte professionnel
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Ne pas laisser l’arbre du digital cacher la forêt des disruptions I Dominique Turcq

Ne pas laisser l’arbre du digital cacher la forêt des disruptions I Dominique Turcq | Entretiens Professionnels | Scoop.it

"Il serait temps d’arrêter de ne parler que de la révolution digitale car à force de tout mettre sur le dos du mot valise « numérique » on oublie qu’il y a d’autres révolutions tout aussi importantes et on finit par conclure qu’en apprenant à chacun à coder on réglera tous les problèmes de croissance, d’éducation et de savoir-faire de la population au travail. Oui, le digital est important mais il n’est que l’une des multiples facettes des révolutions du vingt-et-unième siècle..."

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Neurodiversity: Employers Need To Help People “Come Out” I Neil Milliken

Neurodiversity: Employers Need To Help People “Come Out” I Neil Milliken | Entretiens Professionnels | Scoop.it

'“Neurodiversity is an umbrella term referring to a group of neurological development disorders which share common features, in particular differences in how people learn and process information. Definitions vary, but here we use the term to refer to dyslexia, dyspraxia, dyscalculia, Attention Deficit Disorders (ADD/ADHD) and Autistic Spectrum (Autism / Asperger’s syndrome). Under the law these conditions are collectively known as ‘hidden disabilities’....”

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Françoise Morvan's curator insight, November 4, 2016 7:24 PM
Diversity drives performance and there are plenty of statistics to show this neuro diversity is part of this picture
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Secrets of the Creative Brain I Nancy C. Andreasen

Secrets of the Creative Brain I Nancy C. Andreasen | Entretiens Professionnels | Scoop.it
A leading neuroscientist who has spent decades studying creativity shares her research on where genius comes from, whether it is dependent on high IQ—and why it is so often accompanied by mental illness. 
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partagé via M.G. Siegler https://flipboard.com/section/massive-greatness-bsAI3q @mgsiegler

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Why Learning New Words Is As Fun As Gambling I Sarah Jacoby

Why Learning New Words Is As Fun As Gambling I Sarah Jacoby | Entretiens Professionnels | Scoop.it

'It may not have seemed like it in the middle of high school Spanish class, but actually mastering those flash cards and learning new words can make your brain a happy camper. A new study suggests that our neurological reward system is responsible for that satisfaction...' 

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The Neuroscience of Fairness and Injustice I Melanie Greenberg, Ph.D.

The Neuroscience of Fairness and Injustice I Melanie Greenberg, Ph.D. | Entretiens Professionnels | Scoop.it
How Our Brains Are Wired to Resist Unfair Treatment
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partagé via Phyllis Mufson @phyllismufson

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#Learning : 9 Signs That Neuroscience Has Entered the Classroom I Staff Writers

#Learning : 9 Signs That Neuroscience Has Entered the Classroom I Staff Writers | Entretiens Professionnels | Scoop.it
We still have a long way to go in understanding the science of learning, but neuroscience is already changing the classroom for the better.

Via steve batchelder
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Armando's curator insight, April 11, 2014 7:17 PM

9 Signs That Neuroscience Has Entered the Classroom - Online Universities

Patricia Forrest's curator insight, April 24, 2014 8:52 AM

A must read for all teachers or anyone in charge of curriculum design and development!

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Why Organizations Fail

Why Organizations Fail | Entretiens Professionnels | Scoop.it

We've fostered generations of managers with robust analytical skills and poor social skills, and we don’t seem to think that matters.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Terence R. Egan's curator insight, November 16, 2013 8:05 AM

 

SUMMARY

 

For a long time, we believed that people were rational, logical agents, driven by self-interest, greed, and desire. In recent years, we have begun to realize that people have another driver that is of equal, if not greater, importance: the drive to be social.

 

The studies tell the story:

a)  Giving to charity activates the brain's reward system more than winning money.

b)  Painkillers like Tylenol relieve social pain the same way they relieve physical pain.

c)  Being socially rejected can lower your I.Q. score by 20% and cut your GRE score nearly in half.

d)  Seeing a friend regularly has the same effect on our well-being as making an extra $100,000.

e)  Volunteering to help others regularly produces the same increase in well-being as making an extra $50,000.

f)   When an employee meets a person who benefits from their work, that employee can double their productivity.

g)  People will pay $30,000 to be recognized as a high-status employee.

h)  And, finally, being socially connected is literally as good for your health as quitting smoking.

 

Social activity matters more than we have realized. Yet institutions and organizations, from political systems to hospitals, schools and corporations, have been built based on a different set of beliefs:

a)  that people are motivated by money,

b)  that physical -- not social -- health is most important

c)  and that social needs are "nice to have."

 

A boss who knows what his staff members really care about will be able to develop a better team environment.

 

We are deeply social beings, with social needs mattering more than physical needs in many situations. Maslow may have been wrong: Social may not be up the pyramid, it may be down at the base with physical needs. Until this insight makes its way into how we design our institutions, we may continue to see less than 30% of people in our organizations actively engaged in their work.

 

Cath Daley's curator insight, November 28, 2013 9:44 AM

Some of our long-held beliefs about human motivation may be wrong....

Cath Daley's curator insight, December 12, 2013 7:09 AM

and it really all comes down to the ability to be flexible with your communication so that you can interact with evryone in a way that reduces conflict and increases buy in.

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The Art And Science of Performance Reviews I Daniel Goleman

The Art And Science of Performance Reviews I Daniel Goleman | Entretiens Professionnels | Scoop.it

'Performance reviews are the HR ritual that everyone dreads.Brain science shows that positive or negative, the way in which that review gets delivered can be a boon or a curse. If a boss gives even a good review in the wrong way, that message can create a neural downer...'

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What Neuroscience Tells Leaders to Pay Attention to I Amy Brann

What Neuroscience Tells Leaders to Pay Attention to I Amy Brann | Entretiens Professionnels | Scoop.it

"...What does neuroscience add to leaders and Coaches? Neuroscience offers us another lens through which to view things. Most of the time it doesn’t replace psychological insights or observations of people’s behaviour. It adds another perspective. With this addition we can gain further clarity..."

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15 Surprising Discoveries About Learning - InformED

15 Surprising Discoveries About Learning - InformED | Entretiens Professionnels | Scoop.it
What are some of the most encouraging known facts about learning? From taking a walk to learning a new language, there are countless things we can do to

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 14, 2015 11:08 PM

How do we learn? New research continues to inform us and we should help our learners discover that making some shifts in their practices may lead them to being more successful learners. This post provides "fifteen steps towards a better brain."

Four of the steps are below.

* Laughter boosts brain function.

* You can improve your memory with one simple step.

* Bilingual brains process information better.

* Higher vocab increases cognition

Some of the steps in this post may be new to you. Each is explained in more detail in the post, and every step includes at least one (or more) links to additional information.

As you read through think about what you can do in your classroom to help your learners and yourself "build a better brain."

Lisa Gorman's curator insight, March 5, 2015 7:25 PM

An excellent article for parents of children or indeed ADULTS who are interested in maximising their learning... lots of references to brain-based studies for your exploration here!

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Top 5 Neuroscience Discoveries of 2014 I Geoffrey James

Top 5 Neuroscience Discoveries of 2014 I Geoffrey James | Entretiens Professionnels | Scoop.it
The business world embraced neuroscience as the key to breakthrough performance in 2014.
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Neuroscience and Pay: How to Avoid Decision Making Bias in Reward Decisions I David Creelman

Neuroscience and Pay: How to Avoid Decision Making Bias in Reward Decisions I David Creelman | Entretiens Professionnels | Scoop.it
If we want to improve reward decision making we need to confront our innate cognitive weaknesses. Here’s six practical steps to tackle decision making bias.
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8 Ways Technology Makes You Stupid I Rebecca Hiscot

8 Ways Technology Makes You Stupid I Rebecca Hiscot | Entretiens Professionnels | Scoop.it

'People assume that iPhones, laptops and Netflix are evidence of progress. In some ways, that's true. A moderate amount of Googling, for instance, can be good for your brain, and there are apps that can boost brain function and activity.

Yet tech advancements also come with some unintended consequences. Our brains being "massively rewired" by tech, says neuroscientist Michael Merzenich in The Shallows: What The Internet Is Doing To Our Brains, a Pulitzer-nominated 2011 book by Nicholas Carr. Merzenich warns that the effect of technology on human intelligence could be “deadly.”

That got us thinking. How exactly is technology messing up our brains?...'

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Les quatre piliers de l’apprentissage d’après les neurosciences I Jean-Sébastien Dubé

'Article fort bien vulgarisé du ParisTech Review qui interview le professeur Dehaene de la chaire de psychologie cognitive expérimentale au Collège de France... 

On s’intéresse à ce que les neurosciences peuvent nous faire connaître de l’apprentissage et des stratégies pédagogiques à mettre en oeuvre pour tenir compte de ces connaissances... 

D’autre part, on note que les sciences cognitives ont identifié quatre piliers de l’apprentissage: l’attention, l’engagement actif, le retour d’information et la consolidation...'

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Misez sur un leadership fondé sur l'empathie I Dominique Chalvin

Misez sur un leadership fondé sur l'empathie I Dominique Chalvin | Entretiens Professionnels | Scoop.it
Les nouvelles découvertes en neurosciences nous permettent d'enrichir nos connaissances sur le cerveau (gauche et droit ) pour développer un leadership plus efficace parce que fondé sur un nouveau type d'empathie.
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