Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Protein That Crawls: 11 Startups Trying To Get Us To Eat Bugs

Protein That Crawls: 11 Startups Trying To Get Us To Eat Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
From cricket flour-based chips and cookies, to mealworm and fruit fly larvae-based foods, these startups are on a mission to take insect-eating mainstream.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Silicon Valley prides itself on powering the sort of innovation that feels more appropriate to a science fiction movie than real life: self-driving cars, virtual reality, and military-grade robots. But right now, a group of startups with plugged-in investors are working on a project that is considerably less lofty, if still fairly ambitious. That project? Convincing the American public to eat bugs."

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Strange Week: When Insects Become A Delicacy // Theme Week // BTRread

Earth is running out of food, but there are untapped resources below our feet.

The UN states that by 2050 our population will exceed 9 billion and that we Westerners will do what the rest of the world does now: embrace edible insects! Yes, from grasshoppers to ants to worms, these critters make up a food source both nutritional and ecologically low-impact, so why do we scoff at the idea?

A new film takes us to the places that serve things like fried ant larvae tacos and roasted termite queens to show us the delicious benefits of insects.

BUGS, described as "equal parts culinary documentary, political conversation starter and travelogue," made its debut at the Tribeca Film Festival on April 16th. The film follows a group of chefs and researchers from the Copenhagen-based Nordic Food Lab on their quest to uncover new tastes and establish sustainable alternatives.
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North American entomophagy: Journal of Insects as Food and Feed: Vol 0, No 0

North American entomophagy: Journal of Insects as Food and Feed: Vol 0, No 0 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Eating insects is not a common Northern American practice today. However, in the past a variety of insect species was consumed in Northern America (north of Mexico including Greenland). The aim of this literature review is to provide an historical overview of North American entomophagy based upon both peer and non-peer reviewed sources on this topic.

Via Jacques Mignon
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Jacques Mignon's curator insight, April 20, 8:02 AM
Part abstract : "We show that North American Natives, and in certain cases colonists, collected and consumed a large variety of edible insects. These are categorized per order and where available, information on how these species were collected and processed is provided. Lastly, we mention reasons for the renewed interest in edible insects and make suggestions for future studies."
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"Bugs" makes insects palatable

"Bugs" makes insects palatable | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Well, Jiminy Cricket!  I never thought I'd take a bite of food that could bite me back!  
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The ultimate taste test: Insect burger, plant burger or meat burger?

The ultimate taste test: Insect burger, plant burger or meat burger? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The Belgian researchers' battle of the burgers threw up an interesting result: Although meat came out top, consumers liked the insect burgers more when told they contained mealworms, putting it on a par with the plant-based burger.
Insects are increasingly promoted as a sustainable alternative to both meat and even soy. Raising them does not compete with existing farmland nor does it require forests to be cleared, and they have an excellent feed conversion rate unlike livestock for meat and dairy.
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Bug appetit: The nutritional value of eating insects

Bug appetit: The nutritional value of eating insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute guest posts to The Baltimore Sun's Picture of Health blog. The latest post is from Sara Foresman.

The practice of eating insects, known as entomophagy, has existed for thousands of years. Although Western society often scoffs at the thought of touching insects, let alone eating them, many cultures around the world recognize their nutritional value and consider them delicacies.
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Food Tank Summit 2016 Live Stream - LETumEAT

Food Tank Summit 2016 Live Stream - LETumEAT | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Danielle and Food Tank are hosting the Food Tank Summit 2016, April 20 – 21, at the American University in Washington, DC. The summit brings together over 80 leaders, activists, chefs, policy makers, researchers, farmers and media for a series of panels from “Food Security and Conflict” and “Farmers Leading the Food Movement” to “Beyond Calories: The Need for Nutrient Dense Diets” and “The Future of Organic”.
Ana C. Day's insight:

1:15pm Panel: Protein for the Planet

The public health and environmental impacts of industrial livestock production are vast—from water pollution and food borne pathogens to the spread of zoonotic disease, the price of meat is much more than consumers pay at the grocery store. But farmers, chefs, entrepreneurs, and consumers are finding ways to reduce the effects of protein including plant-based foods, insect flour, and grass-fed production that can provide this important nutrient without sacrificing human health or environmental sustainability.

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The Insect Industry Is Officially Incubating: Will Consumers Step Up to the Plate? — Pacific Standard

The Insect Industry Is Officially Incubating: Will Consumers Step Up to the Plate? — Pacific Standard | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects provide protein that comes not only with enormously positive environmental consequences but off-the-charts health benefits as well.
By James McWilliams
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Standing in a foot of snow, Wendy Lu McGill looked up at the roof of her company’s headquarters. It was a rust-red shipping container sitting in the middle of an ad hoc junkyard five miles from downtown Denver. She was contemplating climbing to the top. She wanted to show me the panel of solar tubes that, when fully installed, were going to warm the container for the hundreds of thousands of live insects — mostly crickets and mealworms — that were about to inhabit it."

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Tribeca Film Festival Review – ‘Bugs’ | mxdwn Movies

Tribeca Film Festival Review – ‘Bugs’ | mxdwn Movies | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The idea of sustainable food is particularly vogue right now and to many, the more than 1900 edible insects seems like an ideal solution to the problem. The truth of course is far more complex. Bugs is a film about food and sustainability, but it’s also a film about the cost of holding onto ideals.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Scientists have known for a long time that edible insects are not only good for you, and non-western civilizations have known for even longer. And while the notion that insects may be the future of food is growing in popularity, most people in western cultures still cringe at the idea of eating bugs. Enter the Nordic Food Lab, where researcher Josh Evans and chef Ben Reade have set out to circumnavigate the globe to investigate the politics and flavors of this food source. Along the way they find diverse and rich cultures, each with their own unique relationship to these insects, and confront the idea of a world where insects are farmed not just by local villages, but also by Nestle and Pepsi-Cola."

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How Eating Insects Empowers Women

How Eating Insects Empowers Women | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Women are responsible for cultivating up to 80 percent of the crops in many agricultural nations, and yet patrilineal land laws and customs often prevent them from owning their own property. The typical seed is planted by a woman in earth owned by a man. Divorce, the death of a relative or the failure to find a spouse can all prevent women from accessing traditional agricultural resources, and these women are less likely to have the capital to buy a goat or a flock of chickens. Given the amount of unpaid labor women are expected to undertake in the home, they also have less time available to spend rearing livestock.
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Breakfast Buzz: Would you eat insects for the nutritional value?

Breakfast Buzz: Would you eat insects for the nutritional value? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

SASKATOON – Eating insects has yet to become part of the mainstream Canadian diet, but there are those who believe the creepy-crawlers are the eco-friendly protein of the future. According to the to the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), people in 80 per cent of the world’s countries munch 1,900 different kinds of bugs.

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Laxen: How to eat fried worms

Laxen: How to eat fried worms | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Freshly fried mealworms. A cheese ball with a crunchy cricket crust. Desserts baked with powdered crickets.

It certainly wasn’t your normal picnic spread Wednesday evening at Hope Farms, but it still didn't stop many of the attendees at the sold-out Eating Bugs 101 event from grabbing seconds.

“Really it’s just another protein source,” said Colorado State University professor Terri Randolph, who brought her insect cookbook collection to the class.
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The Launch of an Edible Insect Protein

The Launch of an Edible Insect Protein | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Mophagy, a new European wholesaler of edible cricket and mealworm, has just launched its new range of products in the UK, offering the simplest way to get hold of the best quality insect ingredients for EU businesses. Mophagy offer a range of cricket and mealworm based lines for wholesale, including powdered, whole and flavoured; ideal for use as ingredients in both sweet and savory recipes such as smoothies, bars and pasta or as ready-to-eat – as a snack, or sprinkled on cereal.
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Edible insects: Why chefs should embrace 'nature's best kept secret'

Edible insects: Why chefs should embrace 'nature's best kept secret' | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Benefits

Bentham said the benefits for restaurant owners went beyond giving them a point of difference from using a relatively new ingredient for the western market. 

"The powder is a unique flavour that can’t be likened to anything. It has a rich nutty taste which really adds something to the flavour of dishes, but there’s also the benefit of knowing that you’ve added a product that is zero sugar, has good fats and with strong protein levels and micro-nutrients, so it’s adding a health base to that dish that has been created," he said. 

“By 2050 we are going to have 9.5bn people on this planet so there is a challenge with our present farming methods to try and support this growing population. I’m not saying that insects are the silver bullet, but it’s another option to be able to pass over to restaurants as another staple food ingredient.”
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Crobar vs Zoic vs Bodhi - Battle of the insect bars! | Healthy Perspective

Crobar vs Zoic vs Bodhi  - Battle of the insect bars!         | Healthy Perspective | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
There's some new paleo bars on the block using a common intriguing ingredient ... insect flour - high in protein and sustainable, it's very now. But which one would you buy again, if at all?! Let's find out ..
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Workshop registration form | InsectCentre

Workshop registration form | InsectCentre | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

A third 2-day edition will be held on June 16 & 17. It will be a 2-day event this time, as it turned out to be too much information for 1 day. This creates the opportunity for more networking, questions and discussion.
Insects are widely considered as a promising and sustainable ingredient for feed and food. For many entrepreneurs and businesses this is an opportunity to create new business. To start insect rearing is not a matter of trial and error anymore, but information is scarce and not everything is available and researched. For this reason this workshop is organized. Participants are given the basic information on building an insect business and concerning conditions.
This workshop gives an overview of existing knowledge and experience. The workshop provides knowledge for starting commercial insect production or processing.
Workshop content
Basics on insect biology in relation to rearing
Insects and its market potential
Insect production: Current status of production and technology
Legislation, safety and quality
Excursion to HAS and InsectLab (research facility)
Insect Business creation
The lecturers are from Wageningen University and Research Centre (WUR), HAS University of Applied Sciences and NGNHAS.
Who should attend
Any company which wants to start in the insect sector for feed and food on a commercial base or businesses related to insect rearing for feed and food can benefit from this workshop.
Date, time and location
June 16, 09.30 – 17.30 at Agri&Food Plaza 's-Hertogenbosch, 
Costs
€ 425,- (Ex VAT, including lunches on both days and diner on June 16)
Please read the Workshop  cancellation policy before filling in this registration form.
Registration deadline is June 13.
Your participation is confirmed upon receiving an invoice for the seminar/workshop fee.

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Toronto chef trying to open up more taste buds to edible insects

Toronto chef trying to open up more taste buds to edible insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects are practically everywhere — especially at this time of the year. 

So why not take advantage of the abundance and put them in our food? After all, many are edible, high in protein and have a nutty, meaty taste when roasted. 

Insect entrees not taking flight in Canada
9 food trends we'll devour in 2016
2016 food trends include bugs
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Now you can eat insect tasting menu for $25 in Toronto

Now you can eat insect tasting menu for $25 in Toronto | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
If you're tired of seeing un-intimidating dishes like hagis and bison burgers labelled as outrageous, Cookie Martinez has got you covered. The Toronto container shop restaurant will be serving up a prix-fixe menu centred on bugs on April 27. You read that correctly
Ana C. Day's insight:

"So, what's on this creepy, crawly menu? Cricket empanadas, mealworm ceviche, spicy cricket Thai spoons, cricket pate with crostini, chocolate-covered crickets and guacamole with water bug paste and crushed ants with plantain shavings. Pretty gourmet sounding, if you ask me. The entire menu will run you $25 plus tax. 

Cookie Martinez is no stranger to edible insects. The shop regularly offers a selection of cricket-based snacks, which sound both terrifying and tasty.

If you aren't feeling bold enough to tackle all the courses, stop by one of these joints to get your fix of bug-based snacks.

UPDATE: The event date has changed since this article was first published. The new date for the tasting is April 27."

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Podcast: Changing the mindset around edible insects

Podcast: Changing the mindset around edible insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Harry Harrison and Josh Bentham met over five years ago while working for Lego, bonding over a love of charity work the two then decided to enter the edible insect market and work out what the main psychological barriers stopping people in the West eating insects.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Harry and Josh explain that while doing their research into setting up Mophagy, they realised that the infrastructure in Europe wasn’t in place to support the market.

They explain how they overcame this."

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CPP community consumes bugs for research

CPP community consumes bugs for research | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A Cal Poly Pomona graduate student is examining alternative food sources with a research study about edible insects.
Set to graduate in June, Jaynie Tao, a food science graduate student, is using this project for her senior thesis. Tao is conducting her research under the advisement of Olive Yao Li and Bonny Burns-Whitmore, both human nutrition and food science professors.
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Insect Farming is helping Thailand’s Farmers

Insect Farming is helping Thailand’s Farmers | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A low, scuttling sound is audible from the six concrete pens in Boontham Puthachat’s home. He is a cricket farmer. His crickets are nibbling on a mix of chicken feed, pumpkins, and other vegetables to grow for the five weeks before they are harvested.

Boontham is a farmer in Thanon Nang Klan, one of Thailand’s poorest regions. Here, farmers depend solely on the rains to either yield a good rice crop or leave their fields dry and barren. But Boontham is different. His family is one of 30 in his village raising insects to satisfy the growing domestic demand (even through many international diners would rather starve than try a fried grasshopper).
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How Insect Protein Startups Are Teaching America to Eat Bugs

How Insect Protein Startups Are Teaching America to Eat Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
One day, the average American diner may even be willing to stomach insects in all their multi-legged, chitinous glory. “When we started, we thought the protein bar—our California roll—was kind of out there,” says Lewis. “We’d have told you that we can’t see anybody eating a plateful of grilled grasshoppers in mainstream restaurants any time in the next 50 years. I wouldn’t rule that out anymore.”
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4 Edible Insects That Are Delicacies Around the World

4 Edible Insects That Are Delicacies Around the World | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In most cases, seeing a bug on your plate at a restaurant will prompt a return of the plate, a refund and a one-star review of the establishment. Yes, there's nothing wrong with that — your carbonara would be much better without the ants — but there are cultures around the world where eating insects isn't frowned upon. Rather, it's a delicacy. 

And there are a lot of options to go through —  1,900 documented insect species are deemed edible. They might not be a staple in most American diets, but there are some nutritional properties that could make at least some bugs enticing enough to try.
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5 things to know for the culinarily curious who want to start eating insects

5 things to know for the culinarily curious who want to start eating insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
3. How does the amount of protein stack up?

One hundred grams of cricket flour contains 65 grams of protein, while 100 grams of steak contains less than 30 grams of protein.
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What’s nutritious and packed with protein? Edible insects

What’s nutritious and packed with protein? Edible insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
4. HOW DO YOU EAT THEM?

Grinding or milling is a common method for processing insects. Cricket powder (cricket flour), which is just ground roasted crickets, adds a subtle nutty or earthy flavour to whatever you bake or cook, including cake, cookies, muffins, protein shakes, soup and chili. If you only add a small amount, you won’t even taste it.

Flavoured whole crickets and mealworms taste and feel a lot like a potato chip. Whole crickets can be coated in chocolate, while crickets and mealworms can also be used as a garnish like croutons in salads or soups.
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