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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Could YOU eat mealworms, crickets and cockroaches every day for a month?

Could YOU eat mealworms, crickets and cockroaches every day for a month? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects are a sensible and ecologically friendly source of protein, and yet 'entomophagy' revolts most Westerners. Here's how one student is trying to change that mentality.
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We Fed Cookies Made Out Of Bugs To Our Coworkers. Here's What Happened.

We Fed Cookies Made Out Of Bugs To Our Coworkers. Here's What Happened. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
You may feel squeamish about chomping down insects with their eyes, legs, and antennae still intact, but would you eat insects if they were disguised in butter and sugar-filled cookies? We baked chocolate chip cookies made from pulverized insects and brought them to our office where our brave coworkers tasted them.
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6 reasons you should consider eating insects

This isn't meant as a provocative, theoretical idea. It's a serious solution to the increasingly pressing problems of global warming and animal welfare — and a practical way of adding low-fat protein to your diet. The UN has advocated eating insects for these very legitimate reasons, and it's something two billion or so people around the world have done for centuries.

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Des insectes plutôt que des OGM pour nourrir les animaux ?

Des insectes plutôt que des OGM pour nourrir les animaux ? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
L'Agence nationale de la recherche envisage de nourrir les élevages de poulets ou de poissons avec des farines d'insectes. Une alternative écologique au soja transgénique importé du Brésil, d'Argentine ou des États-Unis. Avec 4,6 millions de tonnes par an, la France est aujourd’hui le plus gros...
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Christian Allié's curator insight, February 17, 8:50 AM

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SOURCE D’ALIMENTATION HUMAINE INDIRECTES’ils sont déjà consommés directement par près de deux milliards d’êtres humains et malgré leurs vertus nutritives, ces insectes suscitent peu l’appétit des Français. Ils pourraient cependant rentrer dans nos assiettes de façon indirecte en nourrissant nos élevages. Candidats idéals : les poissons et les volailles, qui sont des prédateurs naturels des insectes.
 
Le seul problème provient de l’absence d’une filière industrielle en France, comme il en existe déjà pour le ver à soie. C’est pour pallier ce manque que l’ANR a investi près d’un million d’euros dans le bien-nommé projet « Désirable  », en partenariat avec deux PME et cinq centres de recherche (AgroParisTech, l’INRA, le CEA, le CNRS, et l’IRSTEA).

Leur but ? Construire une usine à insectes expérimentale (une "entoraffinerie") pour concevoir des procédés industriels et des normes de qualité. Deux candidats ont été retenus : le ver de farine Tenebrio Molitor et la mouche soldat Hermetia illucens. Le premier est capable de transformer des céréales en protéines animales, tandis que la seconde peut recycler des déchets carnés et du lisier. Des options, certes, peu ragoûtantes, mais particulièrement efficientes sur le plan écologique.
Réactions futures des consommateursMais de nombreuses questions restent encore en suspens, auxquelles entend répondre l'approche pluridisciplinaire et la coopération des scientifiques. Il faut d'abord définir précisément les modes d'alimentation des insectes, calculer leur apport nutritif, l’appétence des animaux pour ces farines, ou encore les réactions futures des consommateurs... Sabrina Teyssier, économiste à l’Inra, s'interroge : « Nous anticipons l’arrivée sur le marché de ces poissons et poulets nourris aux farines d’insectes : combien les consommateurs occidentaux seront-ils prêts à payer et quels sont les mécanismes d’incitation pour changer les comportements ? ».
 
Et c'est peut-être là le plus grand défi, même si des produits dérivés d'insectes sont utilisés depuis bien longtemps dans notre alimentation, à l'instar du rouge de cochenille qui colore nos bonbons. Selon la FAO, le développement de la production de protéines par des insectes est une priorité pour nourrir les 9 milliards d'être humains attendus en 2050.
Jean-Jacques Valette
Journaliste We Demain
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Technology is now tackling the world hunger crisis

Technology is now tackling the world hunger crisis | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

No one is smiling
The next solution may not go down your palate easily: Bugs. Several experiments are currently being conducted about their feasibility as food and some of them are paying off handsomely. Cricket flour has been developed and its been found to be easy to produce, has some of the highest sources of protein and, in blind tastings (where subjects didn’t know what they were eating) has been found to be exceptionally tasty. 

Other insects are also being sliced, diced and tech infused to turn into food options. And, as we all have experienced, insects are one resource that we aren’t going to run out of in the near future. All you need to do is spend one day outdoors in summer to see all your future food buzzing around you.

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Foreword: Why a Journal of Insects as Food and Feed? - Journal of Insects as Food and Feed - Volume 1, Number 1 / 2015 - Wageningen Academic Publishers

Foreword: Why a Journal of Insects as Food and Feed? - Journal of Insects as Food and Feed - Volume 1, Number 1 / 2015 - Wageningen Academic Publishers | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract
The use of insects as a food source by people in different continents was generally viewed by European explorers as a novelty or as an indication of food shortages. In 1885, Vincent Holt advocated that insects could alleviate hunger amongst the poor in his rather quaint publication Why not eat insects? Human entomophagy was put into global perspective in 1951 by F.S. Bodenheimer when he published his book Insects as human food. Advocacy for the use of insects as human food or as animal feed was taken up by Gene DeFoliart, both in the scientific literature (e.g. DeFoliart, 1999) and in his online bibliography (DeFoliart, 2002). More recently, momentum has increased with involvement of the UN FAO through the 2008 workshop Insects bite back in Thailand (Durst et al., 2010), the 2012 FAO meeting Assessing the potential of insects as food and feed in assuring food security in Rome, the release of the FAO report Edible insects: future prospects for food and feed security (Van Huis et al., 2013), culminating in the successful first international conference, Insects to feed the world, in May 2014.
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Insects... A passion! | News and Event | Slow Food Foundation for Biodiversity

Insects... A passion! | News and Event | Slow Food Foundation for Biodiversity | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
"Bring them back, please!" With these words Irad Santacruz Arciniega, cook and convivium leader of Slow Food Tlaxcala Malintzin, Mexico, delivered about ten edible insects to the Ark built last October at Salone del Gusto and Terra Madre, asking that they be carefully safeguarded. While Irad delightfully described the virtues of gusanos blancos del maguey, a woman cautiously approached, asking if people actually ate the bugs, some as big as fingers. The crunch of a lovely, robust gusano between the Mexican's teeth and the curious woman's cry just before disappearing closed the conversation. Irad must be used to it, and he knows exactly what to do. No words, just a quick bite.

The Mexican cook has no doubt: insects are the closest food to madre tierra (Mother Earth) because they live in contact with the soil, they are gathered by bare-handed colectores, and they require little cooking; that is, if they're not eaten raw.
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It's The Next Generation Of Flour That's Made From Crickets

It's The Next Generation Of Flour That's Made From Crickets | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

SALT LAKE CITY, UT -- By the year 2050, this planet will be packed with 9 billion people, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization predicts. The FAO is growing concerned with how we're going to feed those people and has commissioned a lot of studies on eating insects.

Before you let the "ick factor" take over, know this: 2 billion people worldwide already eat insects as their main source of protein. There are 1,900 species of edible insects, and the list is growing. It's best with something palatable, something that gets over the ick factor.

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The Food Innovation Summit Brussels 2015

The Food Innovation Summit Brussels 2015 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The Food Innovation Summit in Brussels in 2015 was a chance to meet with leaders in the industry. Let's take a look at the highlights
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Why Don't We Eat Bugs in Western Culture?

Why Don't We Eat Bugs in Western Culture? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Would you consider adding insects to your diet? Why or why not? Well, to answer this, I had to branch out of my area of expertise and ask a Biological Anthropologist, Dr. Julie Lesnik, as to why we...
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Minussi - Student projects - L’École de design Nantes Atlantique

Minussi - Student projects - L’École de design Nantes Atlantique | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In western society, insects are not considered to be a foodstuff. However, eating insects is more than just a fashion – it could become a genuine solution for a sustainable food system: superior nutritional qualities and energy-efficient breeding with a low carbon footprint.
The project "insects: tomorrow’s mini-livestock" is a process designed to make insects more attractive, in order to boost their consumption by western consumers. Research focused on identity and representations, analyzing cultural resistance and providing solutions for overcoming it.
Minussi is an innovative product, based on an Asian tradition of eating insects: insect and vegetable kebabs coated with delicious oil-rich fruits which provide the same amount of protein as a meal. Minussi offers an original and appealing representation of insects, that breaks away from traditional negative western attitudes towards this food.
Minussi is one of the 18 projects exhibited at Design(s), l’expo 2013.
The Minussi project is part of the Observeur du design 2015 exhibition by APCI in Paris.
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World's Best Restaurant Noma Brings Insects Back Onto the Plate: Shall We Follow - ForbesLife

World's Best Restaurant Noma Brings Insects Back Onto the Plate: Shall We Follow - ForbesLife | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insect-eating is making headlines again this year. Aside from Baum + Whiteman’s 2015 Food & Beverage Forecast of insect protein bars growing more popular in the U.S, Noma at Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo is serving ants (on live shrimp) again since its 2012 pop-up in London. As someone who gets squeamish around [...]
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Cricket flour could bring bug-eating into the mainstream

Cricket flour could bring bug-eating into the mainstream | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Two University of Oregon students have created a more palatable way to dine on crickets. While it might sound like something out of the Survivor reality show, two University of Oregon students have found a way to increase the world’s intake of protein without clearing another acre of forest. Cricket Flour is not a trendy name; it’s an actual description of what Charles Wilson and Omar Ellis are bringing to market—and it’s tastier than you might think.

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What is Entomophagy? - 4ento

What is Entomophagy? - 4ento | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
With the world in search of alternative food sources, the word Entomophagy is starting to appear all over the web. So what is Entomophagy? Well, according to wikipedia Entomophagy is the human consumption of insects as food And in fact the word is derived from the Greek words for insects and to eat. However, is it as simple as that? A Broad Definition The broader definition ofEntomophagy actually includes arthropods that are not insects such as some arachnids (spiders) and also myriapods (centip
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U.S. cricket farming scales up

U.S. cricket farming scales up | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Tiny Farms co-founder Daniel Imrie-Situnayake is helping to lay the technology groundwork for industrial-scale insect production in the United States. Daniel Imrie-Situnayake Two billion people wor...
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Edible insects: grub pioneers aim to make bugs palatable - FT.com

Edible insects: grub pioneers aim to make bugs palatable - FT.com | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. 

Appealing to the senses is important when introducing novel foods, says chef Andy Holcroft. He is planning the opening of Grub, a restaurant serving delicacies such as Moroccan-spiced insect kebabs, at a bug visitor attraction in Wales. “Crispy and crunchy descriptions of insects, such as stir-fried or sautéed, sound more appetising than soft-boiled or poached . . . [which sound] squelchy and squishy,” he says. His venture follows a move by Wahaca, a high-street Mexican restaurant chain, to put crickets on its specials menu.

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Insect diet offers squirming sustainability

Insect diet offers squirming sustainability | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
From juicing to gluten-free labels, the health world has played host to its fair share of hype in recent years. However, one Auburn University senior is pioneering a new health-based challenge: Camren Brantley-Rios is eating bugs three times a day for 30 days in hopes that more members of the Western world will incorporate insects into their diets. 
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Sustainable Restaurant Awards 2015: Insects on the menu as chefs look to the future

Sustainable Restaurant Awards 2015: Insects on the menu as chefs look to the future | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Cricket fudge, insect canapés and cocktails with a conscience are some of the foods of the future being showcased at this year’s Sustainable Restaurant Awards, to be presented next week.

Wahaca will be serving an experimental dish: pickled vegetable tostadas with grasshoppers. The Mexican chain successfully trialled grasshoppers at its Southbank restaurant in south London in 2013, later introducing them across its restaurants in the form of the salsa chapulines fundido.
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Bugging Out: Culinary Tips From an Amateur Insect Chef

Bugging Out: Culinary Tips From an Amateur Insect Chef | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A college student is eating mealworms, crickets, and wax worms three times a day for one month—and he hopes you’ll eventually do the same.
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Eating Insects: A Journey Through Time

Eating Insects: A Journey Through Time | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Dr. Julie Lesnik, before conducting an enlightening interview with me about the present and future of entomology, gave an engaging talk as part of UGA's entomology seminar series about our very dis...
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La barre énergétique aux vers, friandise du futur

La barre énergétique aux vers, friandise du futur | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Des étudiants ont élaboré une barre énergétique qui contient un ingrédient secret un peu particulier. Les étudiants zurichois Meinrad Koch (à gauche) et Stefan Klettenhammer ont collaboré pour concevoir un casse-croûte à base de protéines de vers de farine.? 

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Current State of Legislation For Insects As Food - 4ento

Current State of Legislation For Insects As Food - 4ento | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Is selling Insects as Food legal? Find out what the current state of legislation is for edible insects and what the future holds for this rising trend.
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▶ Alternative Protein | Kevin Bachhuber | TEDxYoungstown - YouTube

Alternative food sources are discussed. Kevin Bachhuber is the founder of Big Cricket Farms, the first urban edible insect farm in the US. His prior work has...
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Insects... A passion! | News and Event | Slow Food Foundation for Biodiversity

Insects... A passion! | News and Event | Slow Food Foundation for Biodiversity | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
"Bring them back, please!" With these words Irad Santacruz Arciniega, cook and convivium leader of Slow Food Tlaxcala Malintzin, Mexico, delivered about ten edible insects to the Ark built last October at Salone del Gusto and Terra Madre, asking that they be carefully safeguarded. While Irad delightfully described the virtues of gusanos blancos del maguey, a woman cautiously approached, asking if people actually ate the bugs, some as big as fingers. The crunch of a lovely, robust gusano between the Mexican's teeth and the curious woman's cry just before disappearing closed the conversation. Irad must be used to it, and he knows exactly what to do. No words, just a quick bite.

The Mexican cook has no doubt: insects are the closest food to madre tierra (Mother Earth) because they live in contact with the soil, they are gathered by bare-handed colectores, and they require little cooking; that is, if they're not eaten raw.
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Edible Insect Network: Nutritional Benefits of Insects

Edible Insect Network: Nutritional Benefits of Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Talking about nutritional facts without completely bamboozling you is tricky as there are many different facts, figures and considerations when looking at the nutritional benefits of insects, but hopefully there is something below that is new to you!

Insects also known as mini livestock or land shrimps (as some are members of the Arthropod family along with Crustaceans) have highly variable nutritional value due to the wide variety of species as well as the metamorphic* stages of insects.  Other factors contributing to the  varying nutritional value of insects is, like many other food, how they are prepared, cooked or processed (for example insects are highest in protein when in dried form) and what the insect has been fed on (whether it be grain or organic waste).  Therefore many nutritional facts and figures you see may vary for this reason.  

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