Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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#BugsEndHunger - Eat bugs, fight for #foodsecurity. Share, donate, eat & empower! @LittleHerds #SeedsOfAction

#BugsEndHunger - Eat bugs, fight for #foodsecurity. Share, donate, eat & empower! @LittleHerds #SeedsOfAction | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
What happens when you eat bugs for 30 days? We believe it will help fuel a movement to end global malnutrition. Little Herds is proud to partner with Seeds Of Action for the #BugsEndHunger campaign. On May 1st, Seeds Of Action co-founder Jeremy Connor will begin his 30 day diet of eating bugs and plant based foods that can be found, or brought in through food aid programs, in areas where the 1 billion chronically hungry are struggling to live. This campaign will bring awareness to edible insects as a sustainable solution to food insecurity and produce a freely distributed, visually based, Farming Insects Guide (FIG) to empower communities across the planet to begin farming insects for food and economic security.
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Cricket farming is sustainable but food source must be focus, study notes

Cricket farming is sustainable but food source must be focus, study notes | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Cricket farming can be a sustainable means of producing foods for human consumption, a study suggests, as its environmental impact compares favourably to broiler chicken production.
Those were the conclusions put forward by a Danish team, who whilst heralding edible insect species as a possible solution to the current and future food crises, also identified cricket feed  production methods as an area of concern.

“While crickets consume plant matter in the wild, farmers started to use commercial chicken feeds because they saw that the crickets grew faster,” said Afton Halloran, study co-author and researcher at the Department of Nutrition, at the University of Copenhagen.

“Unfortunately, the production of feed ingredients like maize and soy can have detrimental effects on the environment.”

Consumption of crickets as an alternative protein source here in Europe may be limited by factors such as consumer attitudes and adoption, but feed sources used to cultivate the crickets remains a prime environmental concern.

In the past alternative sources such as different kinds of plants and waste products have been put forward to varying degrees of success.

In contrast, the Far East, and Thailand in particular, cricket farming has been occurring for nearly 20 years with 20,000 farms scattered throughout the north-eastern and northern parts of the country.
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Inapub News - Eat insects instead of meat, say scientists

Inapub News - Eat insects instead of meat, say scientists | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Researchers at the University of Edinburgh suggest that by replacing half the world’s meat intake with insects such as crickets, livestock farmland can be cut by a third to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
The study is the first to compare environmental impacts of conventional meat production with those of alternative sources of food. 
Dr Peter Alexander, from the University of Edinburgh’s School of GeoSciences and Scotland’s Rural College, said: “A mix of small changes in consumer behaviour, such as replacing beef with chicken, reducing food waste and potentially introducing insects more commonly into diets, would help achieve land savings and a more sustainable food system.”
While it has no plans to put an ant-burger on the menu just yet, the Pig & Whistle in Earlsfield, South West London says their edible insect snack selection is a nice revenue stream.
The pub sells everything from scorpions to milk chocolate covered crickets. 
Licensee Lee de Villiers said: “We have stocked edible insects for four years sell about 250 bags a year.
“Most customers buy them after a few pints have built up some Dutch courage, but we have a few who like them and come in because we have them.”
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Edible insects are just one more hard to swallow 'miracle'

I have developed deep scepticism for the daily scientific miracle. Researchers have found a way to ‘cure’ a deadly disease/feed the starving billions/save the planet (delete as applicable) that could be a ‘promising’ solution to an intractable problem.

Universities under pressure to bring in research funds task their press officers with communicating academic work likely to attract grants by serving up narratives that make for easy headlines. Under-interrogated stories get fired out in rapid succession, the latest one frequently contradicting several before. But who cares? These days their audience increasingly has the attention span of a flea.
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Crickets over chickens: First study of its kind shows that farming insects for food is sustainable

If you close your eyes, you might just mistake it for a potato chip. Crickets are similar to the deep-fried snack in both texture and taste. Raising the critters for human consumption has been increasing in popularity in Canada. Insects have been declared the “future of food” and Ontario-based Entomo Farms is one of the companies leading the charge.

The first of its kind, a University of Copenhagen study shows that farming crickets for food is more sustainable than other livestock, ScienceDaily reports. The study examined 15 potential problem areas in commercial production, comparing farms raising boiler chickens to those raising crickets in Thailand.

“This research is very timely, as there are many different stakeholders interested in farmed insects. Many people have seen insects as a means of lowering the environmental burden of animal production,” lead author Afton Halloran told ScienceDaily.
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Switching Just 50% of Our Meat to Insects Can Seriously Reduce Land Use

Switching Just 50% of Our Meat to Insects Can Seriously Reduce Land Use | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
If we want to cut the environmental impact of livestock, switching to insects and imitation meat products is our best bet, according to a new report.

The inevitability of turning to insects to feed the world's growing population has been looming for a while. And now we finally have some data on how much this shift would actually help the planet.
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19 Weirdest Foods Made With Insects

#3 - Shellac (shughlack) Glaze
If you were given two apples, one was shiny and red and the other, was still red, but not shiny at all, which one would you choose? If you chose the shiny red apple, chances are you are eating shellac. Shellac, gross enough, is a sectreation made from the rear end of a lac bug, and the food industry dips just about anything in it. Although you may think of wood varnishes or sealants when you think of shellac, you should really be thinking about that coating on your medication, on your candy, coffee beans, and yes, even the produce you buy in the store. If it has a shiny coating, chances are it’s covered in shellac. This picture shows you the tiny lac bug. While this one shows you the nasty secretion this lady leaves behind after she’s done mating. You eat that mating juice, just so you know.

#2 - Red Dye
Believe it or not, but chances are you are already ingesting some sort of bug, especially if you enjoy red candies such as red Skittles, Swedish Fish, or anything else made of red dye. The red coloring is called carmine (carmin), and is made up of the crushed up abdomens of female beetle-like African insects. This picture shows the cochineal (kaw chineal) bugs right before they are crushed up and added to your red candies, yummy.


#1 - Giant Toasted Ants
Toast them or not, this is still a gross product in our book. In some parts of the world, this may be seen as a delicacy, but to us, the bugs can stay outside, not in our mouths.
Ana C. Day's insight:
Published on May 16, 2017

From Dehydrated Zebra Tarantula to Giant Toasted Ants here are 19 Weirdest Foods Made With Insects.

Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr

#8 - Fruit Flies
If you don’t see little tiny flies flying around your fruit bowl at home, don’t be so sure that you are free of the pesky insect. The FDA allows five fruit flies in each 8-ounce juice pouch, 35 in an 8-ounce package of raisins, and up to 15 fruit fly eggs are allowed in every 100 grams of spaghetti sauce you eat. We bet you won’t be on your way to make spaghetti and fruit flies tonight. This is a picture of a little dish that was obviously used to capture and kill a few dozen fruit flies, could you imagine eating them in your red sauce or your fruit juice?

#7 - Dehydrated Zebra Tarantula
Thank goodness it’s dehydrated because if we had to kill this guy ourselves, we would probably opt out of this food item altogether. JUST KIDDING! We’d never eat a freaking tarantula, not even for a million dollars. But, if you were the adventurous type, you could buy yourself a dehydrated zebra tarantula off Amazon today. We just won’t be joining you.

#6 - The Joy of Maggots
If you liked mushrooms, I would go ahead and skip past this part of the video; it’s not information that’s going to make you a happy camper. We all know that the FDA is in charge of making our food safe; we also know that they allow a certain percentage of bugs, rodents, and fecal matter that they deem to be safe to ingest. Just so you know, the FDA legally allows there to be up to 19 maggots in EVERY 3.5-ounce can of mushrooms. Have fun sleeping tonight. In this picture you can see a can of mushrooms, there can legally be 19 maggots in this one can. It makes you think twice about what you’re really eating, huh?


#5 - The Joy of Mites
You may have thought that we were done talking about that can of mushrooms, but we aren’t. We have more good news for you to digest. Apparently, in ADDITION to the 19 maggots allowed in your can of mushrooms, they’re also allowed to have up to 74 mites in each 3.5-ounce can. For those of you new to life, “in addition” means that there are BOTH maggots AND mites allowed in your mushrooms. We don’t know about you, but we aren’t ever eating mushrooms again, unless they’re fresh and maggot and mite free. Here’s a picture of a few mites, so that you know what you’re getting yourself into.


#4 - Crickettes
If you think that eating bugs is just like eating a bag of potato chips, then you and the creators of this delicious snack need to start a club. These “Crickettes” you see here come in more than one flavor so that you can try them all and choose a favorite. Sounds like a yummy Saturday afternoon to us!

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Healthy Nutrition Food science and manufacturing, R&D, Food marketing and brand management

Healthy Nutrition Food science and manufacturing, R&D, Food marketing and brand management | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Scope: How can innovation in nutrition help to improve the well being of the growing and ageing population in the world? With a growing and ageing population worldwide, the importance of healthy nutrition is of paramount importance. The impact of technology requires a cross-sector knowledge exchange and cooperation. This conference brings the food industry, retailers, foodservice providers, government and those working in nutrition, together to enable collaboration and innovation and to support a sustainable healthy nutrition landscape for the future.

Focus topics:

Smart & Healthy Ingredients
Sustainable Food Manufacturing
Protein Transition (e.g. insects and seaweed)
Food design
Food Policy and Regulation
Innovative technologies for Healthy Nutrition
Food Science / R&D
Funding
Economic, business and social issues
Legal and Regulatory issues
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Edible-insect project builds literacy skills

Edible-insect project builds literacy skills | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Educator Wendi Pillars in this article describes how a unit on edible insects offered engaging, authentic opportunities for her English-language learners to expand their language and literacy skills. Students created one-minute videos on the topic, sampled insect-based foods, interviewed a chef and developed a booth with presentation materials for a festival.
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Chivas Venture - SENS Foods

Published on Mar 9, 2017
SENS Foods offers healthy and sustainable protein bars and other next-gen foods products using cricket flour

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Eat the Beetles! explores the future of our grub | Toronto Star

Eat the Beetles! explores the future of our grub | Toronto Star | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
As someone who grows Monarch butterflies, loathes earwigs, respects bees and is allergic to wasp stings, I have a conflicted relationship with insects. So do most of us. But listen up, foodies: insects are a potentially major food source, writes David Waltner-Toews in Eat the Beetles! — and a high-protein, low-fat, tasty one, at that.

Waltner-Toews is delighted insects are hopping up on menus globally. He recounts his personal tastings of palm weevil larvae in Paris (they taste like figs), lime-fried crickets in Laos, caramel mealworms and chocolate-covered locusts in London. And for anyone who’s squeamish, or even screamish, he asks: is a plate of insects any weirder grub than a plate of chicken wings?

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Edible insects and plants - What is there to eat? - NYS Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation

Edible insects and plants - What is there to eat? - NYS Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Saturday, July 1, 2017 01:00 PM

Lake Erie State Park (Allegany)
Nature supplies hundreds of edible plants if we know where to look. Adele Wellman, Environmental Educator from Allegany State Park, will lead a walk along the trails to help you find and learn to identify some of the most common edible plants in the area. Meet at the bath house.
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Edible bugs are a business challenge

Edible bugs are a business challenge | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
“Crickets are aromatic and silkworms are seriously soft,” said Ryu Si-doo, the 33-year-old CEO of the Edible, Inc. Reading the doubt on a reporter’s face, he pre-empted a protest. “I thought the same at first,” he said.

Ryu received his bachelor’s degree in economics at Seoul National University in 2012 and took night classes for his masters in information management at Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Kaist) while working at an IT company during the day.

He first learned about edible insects when he happened on an article about businesses in Silicon Valley using insects in food.

Out of curiosity, Ryu ordered an edible-insect energy bar. His conclusion? “It wasn’t too bad,” said Ryu. “It seemed fine as a food resource rather than as a delicacy.”
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Edible Insect Seminar & Workshop | InsectCentre

Edible Insect Seminar & Workshop | InsectCentre | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Seminar & workshop content
Basics on insect biology in relation to rearing
Insects and its market potential
Insect production: Current status of production and technology
Legislation, safety and quality
Insect Business creation
The lecturers are from Wageningen University and Research Centre (WUR), HAS University of Applied Sciences and NGN.
The first day, will consist of lectures where state of the art information about the insect production & processing will be shared with you. News fresh from the latest research will be presented.
The second day, is about you and your plans. The content of this day is about networking, collaboration and funding projects. You can present yourself, your business and/or projects you are involved in, or pitch you ideas. If you are up to find partners, you will have networking opportunities and there will be a workshop on the financial aspects of the insect business.
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Ethnoculinology — Every Culture has its Dumpling – Lee Cadesky – Medium

Ethnoculinology — Every Culture has its Dumpling – Lee Cadesky – Medium | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Creating foods from bugs straddles a line between the traditional and the futuristic. Insects have been a part of our food history for millennia but they haven’t integrated deeply into most cultures. It’s an exciting prospect because it’s an invitation to create new foods and new culture. A few months ago I got to make my own cricket dumplings. They’re whimsical too.
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Study Finds That Going Meatless Could Save the Environment

Study Finds That Going Meatless Could Save the Environment | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
TAKING A BITE OUT OF EMISSIONS

In the first study of its kind, the U.K.’s Global Food Security Programme and the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme have found that swapping beef for insects or chicken could have huge benefits for the environment in two ways. First, by decreasing the amount of greenhouse gasses produced, and second, by freeing up millions of acres of land.

Gidon Eshel at Bard College in New York told the Guardian in 2014 that giving up beef will have a greater impact on the environment than giving up cars. Eating more insects or other imitation meat would also free up 4,150 million acres of land — a distance roughly equivalent to 70 times the size of the U.K.
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Study: eating insects instead of beef can help climate change

Study: eating insects instead of beef can help climate change | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
According to a study by the University of Edinburgh and Scotland’s Rural College, eating insects instead of beef could help tackle climate change by reducing emissions linked to livestock production.
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The 'Bug Man' flies on from Purdue

The 'Bug Man' flies on from Purdue | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The next year, Turpin cooked insects for the event as part of an "insects as food" talk and nearly 1,000 people came out. It kept growing every year and eventually joined other campus events until it officially became Spring Fest, an annual event in which departments from across the university showcase the fun, "lighter side" of their work to the public.

“He didn't have full support of Purdue’s administration when we started Bug Bowl and Tom was willing to go ahead even though he was counseled not to do it," Provonsha said. "They wouldn’t even unlock the doors for us in its first years. We had to put a stick in the door so people could come in."
Ana C. Day's insight:

“We had this need, I thought, to reach beyond our standard people taking entomology who required it for their discipline,” Turpin said. “I kept arguing that we as a department need to introduce a class for non-science people. We need more people to take entomology.”

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Forget Meat & Fish, Insects are 2017’s Highest Trending Source of Protein

Forget Meat & Fish, Insects are 2017’s Highest Trending Source of Protein | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
With news of a rapidly increasing population and the constant search for new food sources, particularly protein, to meet popular demand; it’s perhaps unsurprising that (disregarding unpleasant connotations) insects have become such a popular dietary addition.

It’s estimated that over two billion people, worldwide, consume bugs as part of their daily diet, while in a BBC interview earlier this year Hollywood Actress Angelina Jolie revealed that she and her children regularly enjoy eating insects. Once we’re able to overcome the “yuck factor” – a term coined by the Waste and Resources Action Programme – insects are not only an environmentally sustainable food, they’re also highly nutritious.

Back in 2013, two friends Shami Radia and Neil Whippey formed Eat Grub, encouraging people to embrace insects as a food source. In his marketing work with international charities, Shami travelled to many countries around the world including Malawi, where he saw a whole community’s excitement at roasting and eating flying termites as well as how great they could taste. Neil’s interest in exploring new foods, on the other hand, was kindled by a diagnosis of Crohn’s Disease at the age of 19.
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8 edible bugs you should eat before you die

8 edible bugs you should eat before you die | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
For survival or for satiety, bugs are on the menu.

While the idea of eating insects might repulse you, the United Nations recommends adding more of these creepy crawlies to your diet.

Their mix of protein, high fiber, healthy fats and minerals make them a good source of nutrition.

TOMORROW AT 5 A.M.: Katherine Whaley takes you to two restaurants for adventurous eaters in Houston, where snakes and grasshoppers are all on the menu.

RELATED: Vending machine at Houston Museum of Natural Science serves insects as snacks
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Edible Bugs! Wendi Pillar’s Engaging ELL Unit

Edible Bugs! Wendi Pillar’s Engaging ELL Unit | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
By Wendi Pillars

Each semester I get to write new units and curricula for our English Language Learners, and since many students are in my class multiple times, I’m constantly seeking new topics to tie our literacy skills together.

This semester our focus came from United Nations Sustainable Goal #2, Zero Hunger. We began by using excerpts from the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization report on Future Prospects for Food and Feed Security and the book Edible Bugs (Reading A-Z) as our base texts. We have also drawn on interactive transcripts from a handful of TED Talks, UNICEF resources, and help from folks who are raising insects for consumption.

It’s been a semester with plenty of crunch!
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Relief for the East Africa drought now and for future!

Published on May 14, 2017
Today I discuss how you can help with relief from the drought now by supporting an effort for immediate solution now and how the Farming Insects Guide (FIG) can help for the future. Also some behind the scenes, mail time and some good food!

Jérôme Jarre & Casey Neistat Video: https://youtu.be/pqQiimdTIL0
Their gofundme page: https://www.gofundme.com/LOVEARMYFORS...
Original call to action video: https://youtu.be/93dDP-O4VsI

Check out our latest episode and our #BugsEndHunger Campaign. Don't forget to subscribe to the Seeds of Action Page and the YouTube Channel (click on the bell to get a notification when they are released).

Consider donating to help #FundTheFIG, our picture-based Farming Insects Guide. Click here to donate: http://www.BugsEndHunger.com

We are thankful for the sponsors featured in this episode:
Merci Mercado​ - http://mercimercado.com
One Hop Kitchen - http://onehopkitchen.com/
Cowboy Crickets - https://cricketcookie.com/
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Sens Foods - Our edible insects are the future of food…

Sens Foods - Our edible insects are the future of food… | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Our edible insects are the future of food…

At SENS, we’re working towards a future where everyone fuels with healthy and sustainable protein...from crickets.

We teamed up with a chef who has 13 years of experience in cooking with insects. Together, we created delicious bars made with cricket flour. We pre-sold 4000 of them in the first 16 days of our crowdfunding campaign - that’s a lot of protein! By using crickets instead of beef, we saved 2 tons of feed, 700,000 liters of water, and greenhouse gases equivalent to a round-the-world road trip. The protein bars are only the beginning. We are going to use insects to create a whole new range of sustainable, next-generation food products to change the mainstream western diet. We aim to increase the demand for insect based food products and insect flours, to attract technological innovation to insect rearing. That way cricket protein will also be cheaper than chicken protein in just a few years.

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PepsiCo has experimented with mealworm powder for its snacks and drinks

PepsiCo has experimented with mealworm powder for its snacks and drinks | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
On the open innovation site NineSights, PepsiCo recently posted a request for "new and novel protein sources for usage in their snacks and beverages." 

These non-traditional proteins could include plant-based protein, mycoprotein (a protein made from mushrooms), or insect protein.
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Korean agriculture research center makes spread out of edible mealworms

Korean agriculture research center makes spread out of edible mealworms | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Korean researchers have developed a product featuring an insect as the main ingredient.
Insects are being dubbed the food source of the future, but the general population is yet to associate them with the dining table, especially because of their appearance.

However, the Agricultural Research and Extension Services located in Chungcheongbuk-do Province has unveiled a spread made with tenebrio molitor, or most commonly known as mealworms.

The spread is made by mixing nine parts of peanut flour with one part of mealworms, thus giving it a nutty flavor.
And due to the worms being rich in protein, unsaturated fatty acid, and various minerals, the spread boasts a high nutritional value.


"Compared to other edible insects, the tenebrio molitor relatively has ample amounts of protein and fat, making the worm a good source of food for babies and recovering patients."
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Eat up! Insects may truly be the sustainable food source of the future

Eat up! Insects may truly be the sustainable food source of the future | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
WHY IT MATTERS TO YOU
By cutting back on beef and eating more (yummy?) insects, you can limit your carbon footprint.
We may prefer to squish them in the West but insects are a staple food source in many cultures around the world. They’re cheap, nutritious, some say delicious, and they’re exceptionally sustainable, according to a new study from the University of Copenhagen.

“A lot has been said about the ‘sustainability’ of eating insects, but in reality, there is little research to support these claims,” Afton Halloran, lead author and entomophagy advocate, told Digital Trends.

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