Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Bugs That Taste Like Bacon & Other Edible Insects | Yummly

Bugs That Taste Like Bacon & Other Edible Insects | Yummly | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Research from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization shows that bugs are excellent sources of protein and healthier for you and the environment
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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#BugsEndHunger - Eat bugs, fight for #foodsecurity. Share, donate, eat & empower! @LittleHerds #SeedsOfAction

#BugsEndHunger - Eat bugs, fight for #foodsecurity. Share, donate, eat & empower! @LittleHerds #SeedsOfAction | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
What happens when you eat bugs for 30 days? We believe it will help fuel a movement to end global malnutrition. Little Herds is proud to partner with Seeds Of Action for the #BugsEndHunger campaign. On May 1st, Seeds Of Action co-founder Jeremy Connor will begin his 30 day diet of eating bugs and plant based foods that can be found, or brought in through food aid programs, in areas where the 1 billion chronically hungry are struggling to live. This campaign will bring awareness to edible insects as a sustainable solution to food insecurity and produce a freely distributed, visually based, Farming Insects Guide (FIG) to empower communities across the planet to begin farming insects for food and economic security.
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It's not cricket but edible insects could feed the world

It's not cricket but edible insects could feed the world | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
According to researchers from Oxford Brookes University, edible insects could help solve a global shortage of food.

The team were among science and technology innovators exhibiting at Oxford science and technology show Venturefest on Wednesday.

With them was former Brookes student Prabh Simran Badal, whose firm Chirrup Food supplies snacks of crickets, meal worms and other mini-critters.

Visitors were offered a chance to try cookies baked using flour from ground-up crickets.

Brookes associate lecturer and PhD researcher Indroneel Chaterjee, said: “We are trying to understand what we can do to overcome people’s inhibitions about eating insects.
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Beetle boom on ScienceOpen: recent additions from the field of entomology - ScienceOpen Blog

Beetle boom on ScienceOpen: recent additions from the field of entomology - ScienceOpen Blog | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Journal of Insects as Food and Feed (Wageningen)

This journal aims to re-define the position insects have in the food chain by putting human and animal entomophagy (i.e. the use of insects as food sources) into a global perspective. This is important as it is likely that insects will become part of mainstream diets in the future due to increasing populations and demands on food resources. These volumes set the table for edible insects and open new perspectives on how and why to integrate them into both human and animal nutrition. The articles uncover complexities in global environmental challenges, entomology, food science, and culture.

One part of studies focus on health aspects and nutritional composition of edible insects and environmental impacts of insect procurement on both a regional and global scale. As a reaction to grand global challenges such as population growth and global warming and increasing pressure of resources followed by them, they make suggestion on how to (re)integrate insects as alternative protein sources into animal and human food chain. One of the main benefits of entomophagy they identify is the smaller ecological footprint of harvesting compared to other protein production techniques. Articles addressing issues like:
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Report shows how many bugs you eat with your food

Report shows how many bugs you eat with your food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
LITITZ, PA (WFLA) — If you’ve ever wondered how many insects you consume through your food, a new report has the answer for you.

Terro, a Pennsylvania-based insect control company, says it’s possible for a person to ingest nearly 140,000 pieces of insect matter each year. It may sound gross, but Terro says it’s normal and completely safe.

According to the report, the FDA allows a small amount of insect material to pass into our food that is guaranteed safe for human consumption. The exact number depends on what the food is but the report says in general, processed foods have more insect fragments and foods that are consumed whole have more complete insects.

Terro based their report off the FDA Action Levels Handbook and an article published by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations called, “Edible Insects: Future prospects for food and feed security.”
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Bug Chef | David George Gordon // 60 Second Docs

Published on Jun 21, 2017
The Bug Chef, aka David George Gordon, released an insect-based cookbook in 1998 and has been cooking with bugs ever since, a traveling chef sautéing scorpions for cheering crowds. Rich in protein, vitamins and minerals, two billion people are already eating bugs; Gordon’s just bringing gourmets up to speed. As our population grows another billion in the next 40 years, Gordon warns that humans will have to find alternate protein sources to spare the environment -- and he thinks bugs are just the superfood we need.
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Edible insects among the attractions at Venturefest

Edible insects among the attractions at Venturefest | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
EDIBLE insects and twin robots are on the menu at Oxford’s annual science and technology show Venturefest today.

Inventors and entrepreneurs from across Oxfordshire will bring their creations to show off to potential investors at Oxford’s King’s Centre in Osney Mead.

Among the innovators pitching for investment are a team from Oxford Brookes, unveiling their insect-based treats.

Now in its 19th year, it is expected to attract more than 1,000 visitors. Tickets cost £50 on the door and include lunch and an evening drinks reception.
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Insect snacks, seaweed protein among Pepsi incubator finalists

Insect snacks, seaweed protein among Pepsi incubator finalists | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Makers of insect snacks and seaweed protein are among the finalists of PepsiCo’s nutrition incubator, which it announced earlier this year.

As part of the programme, the eight finalists will receive a grant of €25,000 and work with PepsiCo for six months to grow their brands.

They include Jimini’s, which makes snack bars out of edible insects; Divingmar, which turns a variety of seaweed into flavour-enhancing proteins; and Tåpped, the producer of bottled birch water.

The PepsiCo Nutrition Greenhouse was launched in April and is designed to increase choice in the healthy snacking space, reflecting Pepsi’s move away from carbonates and unhealthy snacks. Last year, CEO Indra Nooyi told investors that the business would concentrate on ‘guilt-free’ product lines such as diet beverages and low-in-sodium food.

It was followed by strong performance in healthier categories, on the way to $62.8 billion in full-year revenue.

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'The Economist' Raising Awareness of Food Issues Through 'Gross,' Uncomfortable Experiences | Sustainable Brands

'The Economist' Raising Awareness of Food Issues Through 'Gross,' Uncomfortable Experiences | Sustainable Brands | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
At the same time, The Economist will bring #feedingthefuture to San Francisco, rolling out the “Waste Not. Want Not” and “Insect Ice Cream” programs. Throughout the month of June, San Franciscans will be offered free smoothies made from perfectly edible imperfect produce that would have otherwise ended up in landfill. An Economist-branded truck will also offer ice cream topped with edible insects, an alternative source of protein that is regularly consumed in other parts of the world.
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How To Identify Edible Insects And Eat Like A King After TSHTF

How To Identify Edible Insects And Eat Like A King After TSHTF | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Termites: Termites are loaded with protein just like most bugs. You can find them in rotting punky logs. When you find a nest quickly shake the insects out into your container because they will run and burrow further in the log making them really hard to get. Roast them in a dry pan until they’re crispy and enjoy. Do not use any oil or grease because it will just make them super soggy and ruins the taste.
Crickets and Grasshoppers: These insects can be a little tricky to catch and it’s easier to have a net of some sort. When you have your bounty you need to remove the head. Pull the head off and the entrails should come out with it.
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Taste for insects takes wing thanks to booming population

Taste for insects takes wing thanks to booming population | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
There is a buzz around insects among pioneering food entrepreneurs as the health and environmental benefits of crickets, flies and worms have come under the spotlight.

With the world’s population expected to grow to almost 10bn by 2050, boosting the demand for food protein, a small but growing number of companies are turning to the potential of insects as a source of food and feed.

Insects are highly efficient in conversion of feed into edible material, and have a much reduced “environmental footprint” than other animals used for food, according to experts. They also have a high content of protein as well as vitamins and minerals.

“Pioneers in the sector are seeing opportunities,” said Patrick Durst at the UN Food and Agricultural Organisation. “There is clearly a market for edible insects and risk-taking entrepreneurs are moving quickly to capitalise,” he added.
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Edible Insects Market | Industry Research Report 2016-2023 Latest Added By DecisionDatabases – satPRnews

DecisionDatabases.com offers Edible Insects Market Research Report. This Report covers the complete Industry Outlook, Growth, Size, Share and Forecast Till 2023. The report on global edible insects market evaluates the growth trends of the industry through historical study and estimates future prospects based on comprehensive research. The report extensively provides the market share, growth, trends and forecasts for the period 2016-2023. The market size in terms of revenue (USD MN) is calculated for the study period along with the details of the factors affecting the market growth (drivers and restraints).
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‘Pestaurant’ and ‘Hygiene Angels’ visit Sussex Coast College Hastings

‘Pestaurant’ and ‘Hygiene Angels’ visit Sussex Coast College Hastings | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Rentokil Initial visited Hastings last week to install two interactive pop-up stands, ‘Pestaurant’ and ‘Hygiene Angels’ at Sussex Coast College.

On Wednesday 14th June, the ‘Pestaurant’ gave students and staff the opportunity to try ‘entomophagy’ (the official name for insect eating). The ‘mini-bug buffet’ featured a selection of edible insects, including buffalo worms, locusts, BBQ bamboo worms, flying termites and ‘Frankenstein Fudge’.

While the crunchy critters were being eaten, the Hygiene Angels were checking levels of bacteria found on common items such as mobile phones. Students and staff handed over their phones to be swabbed, and were then given a reading of how clean their belongings were. The Hygiene Angels then promoted the importance of proper hand washing.
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WWI #67 Bugs for food? Vincent Vitale of Aspire Food Group/Aketta Crickets

WWI #67 Bugs for food? Vincent Vitale of Aspire Food Group/Aketta Crickets | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Vincent Vitale joins us from Austin, TX as part of Aspire Food Group which produces Aketta, edible crickets. They raise food-grade crickets on a commercial scale, and actively work to normalize the consumption of insects in the western world. Additionally, they commercially farm palm weevil larvae and run a program which empowers peri-rural farmers to raise palm weevils in Ghana.
I sample a few crickets while Savanna and I discuss the possible future of food in a world where resources are becoming limited. 
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This Is How Many Insects You Can Consume A Year When You Drink Coffee

This Is How Many Insects You Can Consume A Year When You Drink Coffee | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Do the insects affect the quality of your coffee? No. You can’t even taste them. In fact, many people are moving toward eating bugs because they’re a sustainable protein source and leave very little impact on the environment when farmed. But, we just thought you should know.

Check out the infographic from Terro for more information on how many of these fragments the average American eats per year. 

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Don't Bug Out: The Latest Food Trend Has Drinkers Pairing Insects With Alcohol

Don't Bug Out: The Latest Food Trend Has Drinkers Pairing Insects With Alcohol | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Traditionally, when a westerner talks about bugs and beer, they’re cheekily referring to the airborne bacteria that can settle into a brew undergoing fermentation in an open vessel to lend sour, funky or other desirable flavors. But these days, someone squeamish about insects (AKA me) can’t count on that reassurance. I admit to grimacing when I tell you that people – sane, “civilized,” non-starving people – in the developed world are pairing creepy crawlies with beer, wine, and spirits with gusto … and asking for seconds.

Hey, I don’t make the news; I just report it.

As entomologists, biologists and anti-hunger activists seek ways for humanity to sustain itself once the global population hits an estimated  more than nine billion in 2050, they’re increasingly advocating for bugs, spiders, worms and their slithery ilk as a plentiful and nutritious solution that taxes the planet significantly less than do cattle and other sources of protein. There’s a scientific term for bugs-as-culinary-treat -- entomophagy -- and a Yale graduate in Los
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Belgian start-up aims to put insects on your plates | All media content | DW | 21.06.2017

Locusts, grasshoppers and other edible insects are a healthy and more sustainable alternative to beef. The global edible insects market is projected to grow because of the lower costs associated with insect farming. And Belgian Start-up, Little Food, edible bugs could also make good business sense. But just how many people are willing to eat insects?
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Mathias Rasch and Josef Hirte sell the insects as a snack - and want to create ecological awareness in particular. Interview by Franziska Schwarz

Mathias Rasch and Josef Hirte sell the insects as a snack - and want to create ecological awareness in particular. Interview by Franziska Schwarz | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Mathias Rasch and Josef Hirte sell the insects as a snack - and want to create ecological awareness in particular.

Interview by Franziska Schwarz

Right beforehand: grilling taste like dry shrimp. The Munich company "Wicked Cricket" offers them with salt, with pink pepper from Brazil or with Allgäuer herbs. Roasted and seasoned cost seven grams 3.99 euros. Josef Hirte, 31, physicist, and Mathias Rasch, 29, teachers, have been selling their crickets on the Internet since May. "Iss or zirp" is their slogan.

About two billion people around the world regularly eat insects . But there are about five billion people who do not. A visit to the Werkviertel at Ostbahnhof, where the two offer their goods also in one of the containers.

SZ: Grasshoppers as a snack - is this now an impact ?

 

Ungewöhnlicher Snack in München: Mathias Rasch und Josef Hirte verkaufen Grillen. Für die beiden gehören Insekten auf den Speiseplan.
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Replacing meat with insects can cut farmland by a third

Replacing meat with insects can cut farmland by a third | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
More insects or imitation meat

Halving global consumption of animal products by eating more insects or imitation meat would free up 1,680M hectares of land – 70 times the size of the UK, it concluded.

Meanwhile, N8 Research Partnership has developed a new method for restoring many of Brazil’s degraded grassland areas. It found that optimising Brazilian grasslands would aid the global demand for beef – estimated to double by 2050 – and cut greenhouse gas levels.

The N8 Research Partnership is a collaboration of eight universities in the north of England.
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This could bug some of you | Agweb.com

Note as well that Chinese hog farmers continue to build herds and by extension, demand for feed, which again should be a long-term reminder to us that increasing global income demographically translates into more protein rich diets, which translates into higher grain consumption.

Of course, maybe there is one segment of the high protein food production that farmers in the United States have been overlooking.  For years those in the business of producing field crops have waged war against insects, and as it turns out, maybe we should be producing them instead of trying to wipe them out.  According to the UN Food and Agricultural Organization, with the population forecast to reach nearly 10 billion people by 2050, edible insects could play a major role as a protein source.  The edible insect market is already a $100 million industry and is expected to grow to around $1.5 billion by 2021.  This also translates to opportunities in the insect “feed” business which currently generates around $30 million in annual sales and is projected to climb over the $1 billion mark by 2022. Granted, I would not expect to see a heaping plate of fried grasshopper displace the turkey at the next Thanksgiving dinner but insects are already consumed by around 2 billion people, and as the above forecasts would suggest, the figure is expected to grow.  I understand that cricket powder is used in protein shakes and cookies so maybe you should read the label a bit closer if this topic is not sounding appetizing. 
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MasterChef 5 - Los insectos se apoderan de nuestras cocinas, MasterChef 5 - RTVE.es A la Carta

MasterChef 5 - Los insectos se apoderan de nuestras cocinas, MasterChef 5 - RTVE.es A la Carta | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
MasterChef 5 - Los insectos se apoderan de nuestras cocinas
11 jun 2017
La cocina con insectos se ha convertido en tendencia en ciertos lugares europeos y aquí está la prueba de todo lo que puedes hacer con ellos.
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Insects as a sustainable food source – Presented by Catriona Lakemond

Insects as a sustainable food source – Presented by Catriona Lakemond | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects as a sustainable food source – Presented by Catriona Lakemond, Wageningen University at the Healthy Nutrition Conference which takes place on June 29, 2017, at Villa Flora, Venlo, The Netherlands.

About Catriona Lakemond
Catriona Lakemond is an Assistant professor in the goup “Food Quality and Design” of Wageningen University, the Netherlands. Her research focusses on insect as a food source. She studies processing of insects to make them suitable for human consumption. This includes biofractionation of insect species with a focus on the protein fraction.

About Wageningen University
Wageningen UR is a research institution that focuses on the domain ‘healthy food and living conditions’ to explore the potential of nature to improve the quality of life. We do fundamental research all over the world. We also train professionals who, in the near and distant future, will discover breakthroughs in science and technology.
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Global Edible Insects Market: Need for Inexpensive Protein Source to Fuel Consumption, says TMR - openPR

While previously, famines and other reasons causing shortage of food compelled people to include edible insects in their diet, today, these insects are being consumed owing to their nutritious properties. Transparency Market Research (TMR) in its latest report, studies the global edible insects market. The report is titled “Edible Insects Market - Global Industry Size, Market Share, Trends, Analysis, and Forecast 2016 - 2024Top of Form.” Edible insects are not just being consumed by humans but are also being used as animal feed, and this is expected to drive the global edible insects market in the forecast period. Some of the edible insects that are expected to remain in demand are bees, ants, flies, wasps, scale insects, cockroaches, termites, beetles, crickets, and grasshoppers. These insects are rich sources of nutrition and used in poultry.
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Edible Insects Market Forecasts Research Report Till 2023

Edible Insects Market Forecasts Research Report Till 2023 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The Edible Insects Market Research Report provides value chain analysis on the revenue for the forecast period 2016-2023 and estimates for each application in terms of market size, share, trend and growth. Get FREE Sample Report Copy @ http://www.decisiondatabases.com/contact/download-sample-17660
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What Would it Take For You to Eat Insects?

What Would it Take For You to Eat Insects? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
According to a recent taste test, you might be more adventurous than you'd think.
When you were an adventurous, curious kid (in Western culture), you might have choked down a bug just to see what it would taste like—but these days, the only thing you do when you spot an ant is reach for some RAID. And yet, despite your natural instinct to be repulsed by creepy crawlers, scientists around the world are pushing for a bug-centric diet as a way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and slow climate change.

Perhaps most recently, University of Adelaide researcher Anna Crump. Ph.D., took to an Australian farmer's market to test people's tolerance for edible bug snacks—a selection of roasted crickets and ants, mealworm cookies, and cricket energy bars.
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Adventurous eaters enjoy novelty, nutritional benefits of insects

Adventurous eaters enjoy novelty, nutritional benefits of insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The idea of eating insects has been gaining traction in Western societies in recent years, Turpin said. These groups typically shunned insects as a food source and as societies became more affluent, higher class people thought of insects as low class.

“In my opinion, insect consumption is not a primary solution to world food but is a niche market for human consumption that is likely to grow.”
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