Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Amanda Eats a Cricket with Hopper Foods

Amanda Eats a Cricket with Hopper Foods | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Amanda tried a Hopper Bar which is an all natural energy bar made from crickets.
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Is FAO turning its back on Edible Insects?: FAO’s Senior Forestry Officer Paul Vantomme retires! - 4ento

Is FAO turning its back on Edible Insects?: FAO’s Senior Forestry Officer Paul Vantomme retires! - 4ento | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Who doesn´t know Paul? The man behind Edible Insects to whom we look for advise and support! A personality in his own right, who has managed to create an amalgam between industry and academia, always making sure the sector will get to move forward. Well, after 25 years of FAO service, our guiding star takes his well-deserved retirement February 1st and I want to invite you to take two minutes to let him know how much his support and knowledge meant to you and your business or project over these years !! Thanks Paul for your #edibleinsect knowledge and support[...]
Ana C. Day's insight:

WHO IS GOING TO REPLACE Mr. Vantomme? Who will be our Ento-Godfather, our glue?

It is my understanding that, so far, nobody has been nominated by his director, Eva Muller (eva.muller@fao.org), to replace him. Is his post at FAO being abolished? In any case, who will look out for the maintenance of any of his previous activities now that he is gone? What about further updates on the webpage Directory, legal studies, networking, projects, meetings and so on?? And it gets worse…! The word INSECTS does not even appear in the official FAO workplans for the years 2016/17 !

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Raymond WM Fung's curator insight, April 3, 12:02 AM

WHO IS GOING TO REPLACE Mr. Vantomme? Who will be our Ento-Godfather, our glue?

It is my understanding that, so far, nobody has been nominated by his director, Eva Muller (eva.muller@fao.org), to replace him. Is his post at FAO being abolished? In any case, who will look out for the maintenance of any of his previous activities now that he is gone? What about further updates on the webpage Directory, legal studies, networking, projects, meetings and so on?? And it gets worse…! The word INSECTS does not even appear in the official FAO workplans for the years 2016/17 !

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Edible aquatic insects vanishing in Loktak: Researchers – Eastern Mirror

Edible aquatic insects vanishing in Loktak: Researchers – Eastern Mirror | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
IMPHAL, June 27:Manipur’s important edible aquatic insects found in Loktak, the largest freshwater lake in North East India, are vanishing from its natural habitat due to the ongoing degradation of the lake’s biodiversity.

To name a few are Naosek (Lethocerus indicus)- the giant water bug; Tharaikokpi (cybister)- a genus of beetle; Konjeng Kokphai (Diplonychus rusticus)- another water bug; and Long Khajing (Gerris Lacustris)- the common pond skater; and Maikhumbi (Baetidae)- a family of mayflies etc.

This came to light during a recent study of diversity of insect fauna in Loktak Lake of Manipur by Dr. M Bhubaneshwari Devi, a zoology teacher in Manipur’s premier DM College of Science, in association with senior research scholar, O Sandhyarani.

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A Famous Edible Bug Market in Beijing Is Closing

A Famous Edible Bug Market in Beijing Is Closing | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Beijing's Donghuamen Night Market has been selling bug delicacies for over three decades, but its time selling edible scorpions on a stick, among other items, is now drawing to a close. According to the Australian Associated Press, the market, usually teeming with customers, will close Friday.

The market is popular with tourists and locals alike, but after loud criticism from neighbors—it can get quite noisy and is said to smell like "stinky tofu"—authorities decided to shut it down, according to the AAP. 
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Insect protein bars available at 15% discount

Insect protein bars available at 15% discount | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Crobar, the UK’s first insect-based food product, has launched two new flavours of protein bar.

Following the success of the original flavours, Gathr now has two new additions to the Crobar family: coffee & vanilla and raspberry & cacao  (rrp £1.79).

All of the Crobar range contain real fruit and nuts, protein-rich cricket flour and contain no gluten, dairy or soy. Crobar never add sugars or sweeteners.
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I Tasted the Future of Food…and It’s Bugs

I Tasted the Future of Food…and It’s Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Last weekend, the Food Loves Tech expo featured dozens of companies using technology and future-forward concepts such as sustainability to create really innovative food products and services. One of the big pushes at the expo was the idea of insects as food.

Bugs were in fact, big at the event.

My first ever intentional consumption of insects was at the booth of Home Grown Cricket Farm. The company makes a do-it-yourself cricket farm kit that is targeted to urban farmers. The idea is to give individuals a way to grow their own protein at home.

A plate of dried crickets was at the center of the booth. The insects were fully intact—legs and antennae attached.
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SPECIAL REPORT: Insects as a Sustainable Protein Source

SPECIAL REPORT: Insects as a Sustainable Protein Source | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
27 Jun 2016 --- As last week was National Insect Week (UK), FoodIngredientsFirst takes a closer look at insects as an alternative protein, other nutritional values and today’s progression of entomophagy into the western world.

In 2013 the United Nations Food & Agriculture Organization stressed that a new approach to food production was crucial if we are to avoid future shortages. Their suggestion was edible insects. It is their sustainability credentials that has lead the UN to highlight insects as the potential future of food, requiring minimal resources to farm and producing substantially less waste than conventional livestock.
 
Around 2 billion people around the world already consume insects as part of their regular diet due to their high nutritional value, versatility and flavor. The planet’s population is expected to exceed 9 billion by 2050, and current food production will need to almost double. The human consumption of insects is something which has been widely accepted in many parts of the world including China, Thailand and Japan.
 
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How to foster a buzzing edible insects industry

How to foster a buzzing edible insects industry | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A Finnish project is to investigate the main hurdles and opportunities for the edible insect industry by linking up input from multidisciplinary players from relevant sectors. 
Invenire Market Intelligence secured €100,000 in preliminary funding from Tekes, the Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation, to spend six months researching business hurdles and opportunities for edible insects and to scope out what multidisciplinary players could be brought in to meet these challenges.

Johanna Tanhuanpää, executive consultant and partner at Invenire, told us the three main hurdles facing the sector were technology, regulation and consumer acceptance.

She said the project was about looking at the role of edible insects within an overall sustainable protein ecosystem. 

This meant going beyond insects alone and could see partnership with other sustainable protein sources like algae as well engagement with technology firms.  
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Insects as food and feed: European perspectives on recent research and future priorities (Forthcoming)

This paper discusses the current state and priorities of Europe-based research on insects as food and feed, based on presentations at a workshop held in December 2015, and discussions that followed. We divide research into studies that focus on farming, health and nutrition, and those that prioritise psychological, social and political concerns. Edible insects are not necessarily universally beneficial. However, certain food insects can convert organic waste material, and provide nutrient-rich protein for humans and animals. Recent research is not concordant when trying to identify social and psychological barriers to insects as food in Europe, indicating the complexity of the issue of consumer acceptance. Innovative means of marketing insects as food include 3D printing, scientific comics, and the promotion of rural food culture in an urban setting. Edible insects are intimately connected to strong cultural and regional values, and their increasing commercialisation may empower and/or disenfranchise those who hold such values. We conclude with a discussion about the future priorities of edible insect research in Europe. We acknowledge the political nature of the ‘entomophagy’ movement. With legislative change, the insect food industry potential presents an opportunity to challenge the dynamics of current food systems. We identify the following priorities for future research: the need to better understand environmental impacts of insect procurement on both a regional and global scale, to investigate factors affecting the safety and quality of insect foods, to acknowledge the complexity of consumer acceptance, and to monitor the social and economic impacts of this growing industry.
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Stamford museum holds “Insect Extravaganza”

Stamford museum holds “Insect Extravaganza” | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The event, “Insect Extravaganza,” will take place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday at the 39 Scofieldtown Road center.
Participants will explore the world of six-legged creatures and other invertebrates and search for insects in the nature center’s stream, pond and forest. They will also have the chance to try some edible insects and enjoy insect-themed crafts.
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These Brothers Eat Crickets and They Think You Should Too

These Brothers Eat Crickets and They Think You Should Too | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Darren Goldin and his brothers had been farming crickets for reptile feed when a UN report on the future of food highlighted insect protein as a good way to feed growing the world’s growing population. Today, the brothers’ business Entomo Farms is producing ten million crickets a week, all for human consumption. (Video by Katherine Wells, Lucy Wells) (Source: Bloomberg)
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Eating Insects: The Future of Sustainable Food Systems, Natural Medicine, and Livestock production

Published on Jun 20, 2016
This research project explores the role that insects play in the development of future sustainable food systems. As the human population increases, we must expand our food sources beyond the limitations of western taboos. Insects contain powerful nutrient profiles that are integral to ensuring food security. Insects also present an opportunity to produce food with limited ecological impacts compared to the resource intensive food production systems currently popular in North America. This project also explores the historical use of traditional insect and arthropod based medicine in regions including East Asia, Africa, and South America. Specific use cases for species of arthropods that have been popular for thousands of years in folk medicine are explored. Health systems reliant on arthropods are important to the world, especially in poorer nations where modern biomedicine is simply not accessible. Finally, outside of the roles that insects play in ensuring future food security, and developing future medicinal products, they will also play a large role in the future redesigning of our global livestock industry. Insects make a good replacement to our resource intensive plant based animal feed, and can play a role in lessening the environmental impact of our meat based protein production. - Property of Drake Tanner Shipway. Produced for Dr. Robin Oakley at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
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Grub's up! How eating insects could benefit health

Grub's up! How eating insects could benefit health | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Fighting malnutrition with insect consumption
The benefits of entomophagy do not stop at weight loss; the UN say eating insects could help combat malnutrition, which is widespread in developing countries.

According to UNICEF, worldwide, almost half of all deaths among children under the age of 5 years are a result of malnutrition, with most of these deaths occurring in Asia and Africa.

A lack of nutrition, whether due to not having enough to eat or the inability to digest the food that is eaten, can increase the risk of life-threatening disease. What is more, malnutrition in the first 1,000 days of life can lead to stunted growth, which can impair cognitive function.

As well as being a very good source of healthy fats and protein, insects are everywhere, meaning they are a very accessible, cheap source of food - a fact that could really benefit low- and middle-income countries where malnutrition is common.
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Elise impresses MasterChef guest Luke Nguyen with cricket dessert

Elise impresses MasterChef guest Luke Nguyen with cricket dessert | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Sunday night's episode of MasterChef saw chef Luke Nguyen give contestants a mystery box which included crickets to create a dish in 60 minutes.

With the power apron in play the contestants got creative and it was Elise and an inventive dessert that won her the coveted apron for the next cook. 

Luke was impressed with her dish telling her: 'It's stunning to look at and you had all the textures we were talking about. And the crickets are in there as well, so, wow, hey, congratulations!'
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I Ate Crickets for 5 Days: Here's What Happened

I Ate Crickets for 5 Days: Here's What Happened | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
I Ate Crickets for 5 Days: Here's What HappenedTwo billion people eat insects regularly. Here’s why you should consider joining them—and what happened when our writer dined on insects for five straight days.
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Edible insect industry primed for growth

Edible insect industry primed for growth | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Ever since New Hope editor Todd Runestad wrote about cricket bars in 2013, the edible insect industry has exploded. While in 2014 just one insect protein product exhibited at Expo West (Chapul), now dozens of companies have hatched business plans focused on entomophagy. From cricket chips to mealworm protein to bitters infused with toasted crickets, now swarms of products feature winged, six-legged critters.
“The industry is less than five years old, but it’s astounding how many companies brought products to market and received significant investments,” says Robert Nathan Allen, president of the 2013-founded educational nonprofit Little Herds.
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We made the food of the future: wormy flapjacks | The Memo

We made the food of the future: wormy flapjacks | The Memo | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The Memo tries insects. They don't taste like you'd imagine.

Not too long ago, food futurologist Dr Morgaine Gaye told us how in the future we’ll all be eating insects.

But even now there are a number of British companies that already sell edible insects – and products made from them.

“Insects are already eaten and enjoyed around the world,” the co-founder of Eat Grub told The Memo.
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This new business is bringing the nutritional value of edible insects to the British public | Business Advice

This new business is bringing the nutritional value of edible insects to the British public | Business Advice | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
From French origins to a foray into the British market, edible insects business JIMINI’S is tapping into modern food trends to produce an offering already attracting the interests of Selfridges and Fortnum & Mason.

(1) Who are you and what’s your business?

JIMINI’S is a French startup designing and making delicious products with insects. Our goal is quite simple: we want to make people change their mind about edible insects so they can enjoy the high nutritional value of this food and lower the environmental impact of our occidental diets.

We make protein bars and seasoned insects in our own factory near Paris, France. My name is Constance Deseine and I am in charge to develop the UK market, I am also the very first employee of the team.
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Are insects the future crop for the vertical farmer?

Are insects the future crop for the vertical farmer? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
While some of us see vertical farms as the solution to produce our food in the future, most vertical growth operations currently still mainly produce a small selection of herbs and leafy greens. At the annual summit of the Association of Vertical Farming in Amsterdam last month, participants were inspired by speakers to think about including alternative crops that provide more nutritious value too. One of these were insects; with a creepy enthusiasm Peter Bickerton tried to convince us that bugs are the food of the future.
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Why we love to eat bugs and why you should too | Roberto Flore & Afton Halloran | TEDxLUISS

Published on Jun 23, 2016
During recent years, insects have been defined the food of the future. Roberto Flore and Afton Halloran explain why it is so: insects are not only a true delicacy but they also represent an opportunity to produce food in a sustainable way and to fight social problems due to a poor diet and malnutrition. What you are about to hear is a real food revolution.


Roberto Flore is Head Chef of the Nordic Food Lab and a Sardinian explorer of the Great North. Roberto’s gastronomic path started in Seneghe, a small village in Sardinia, at the age of 4. He encountered the Nordic Food Lab, where he is currently the Head Chef and leading the gastronomic research of this vibrant organization. One of Roberto’s main activities at the Lab has been working with edible insects.

Afton Halloran is a Canadian PhD Fellow at the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen. She is a part of the GREEiNSECT research group, a group of public and private institutions investigating how insects can be utilized for food and feed in Kenya. Her research focuses on the socio-economic, nutritional, and environmental impacts of cricket farming in Thailand and Kenya. She formerly worked as a consultant with the Insects for Food and Feed Programme at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in Rome. She is a co-author on the FAO’s most popular publication Edible insects: future prospects for food and feed security.
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Winners of Biomimicry, Forward Food Competitions Tackle Food Waste, Behavior Change Challenges | Sustainable Brands

Winners of Biomimicry, Forward Food Competitions Tackle Food Waste, Behavior Change Challenges | Sustainable Brands | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
One Hop Kitchen was the second runner-up and offers a line of products made with textured insect protein, using either mealworms or crickets. A serving of the company’s Bolognese pasta sauce contains five grams of protein per serving and saves 80 gallons of water, compared to the traditional beef option. It also contains half the saturated fat and a third of the cholesterol of standard meat-based pasta sauces. The products are gluten, dairy, soy and preservative-free but according to the founder: loaded with flavor. Participants in the blind taste test reported satisfaction with the sauce and did not suspect that it was made from insect protein.
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Bugs, here to solve world hunger - Journal of the San Juan Islands

Bugs, here to solve world hunger - Journal of the San Juan Islands | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
He has been called a champion of the obscure, and David George Gordon, writer of Eat-A-Bug Cook Book, as well as books on slugs, snails, tarantulas and cockroaches, admits that is a fair description of himself.

"It's easy to get people excited about orcas and eagles, but it's more satisfying for me to write and talk about natures underdogs too," said Gordon, shown right.

Gordon will be coming to the San Juan Islands on June 27, for his lecture, "Adventures in Entomophagy—Waiter, There's No Fly in My Soup!" at 7 p.m., at the San Juan Island Library. The talk will include free samples of edible insect snacks.
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Yummy or...? 5 creepy and delicious insects every Nigerian should try before they die (photos) ▷ NAIJ.COM

Would you ever eat a plate full of insects? Sure, most people would say ‘NO’ and even shake their heads in disgust.

Insects are considered as a good source of protein by some people and many Nigerians eat it.

Insects are plentiful and many are safe to eat but a few of them are dangerous.

Though they look creepy and poisonous, insects are healthy, nutritious, as well as delicious.

Edible insects have long been a part of the human diet and are consumed by a good number of people. They often contain high-quality protein, vitamins, minerals and amino acids for humans.

Some Nigerians are very adventurous with food and they eat insects which they consider a delicacy.
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Gathr adds coffee and raspberry flavours to its cricket snack bars

Gathr adds coffee and raspberry flavours to its cricket snack bars | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Gathr – the UK innovator in cricket flour snack bars – has launched two new flavours of its Crobar in smaller 30g sizes for a more convenient on-the-go snack.

The new bars have been made available to the trade with a recommended retail price of £1.79 per bar. The new flavour variants are coffee and vanilla, as well as raspberry and cacao, both of which will join the brand’s existing peanut and cacao flavours.

The delicate notes of coffee in the coffee and vanilla bar offer a more adult flavour and go perfectly with the subtle hints of vanilla, the brand said, while the zing of raspberries complements the warmth of the cacao in the new raspberry and cacao bar. All of the Crobar range contains real fruit and nuts, protein-rich cricket flour and no gluten, dairy, soy or added sugar or sweeteners.
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Insects – soon to be a regulated food? - Think Tank

Insects – soon to be a regulated food? - Think Tank | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
There is increasing interest in the EU – as in other parts of the world – about how to make use of insect protein in animal feed and human food. While most EU Member States have forbidden the use of insects as human food, others have adopted a more flexible approach, allowing some products on their markets. Until now, EU legislation on insects for human food had had an uncertain stance, but the revised Regulation on novel foods will change this.
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Why don’t we eat bugs? - Journal of the San Juan Islands

Why don’t we eat bugs? - Journal of the San Juan Islands | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Have you ever swallowed a bug? More than 80 percent of the world's cultures eat insects - why don't we? According to the United Nations, insects could very well be the food of the future. Raising grasshoppers as a food source could combat world hunger and reduce harmful greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 60 percent. Please join us on Monday, June 27th at the San Juan Island Library as David Gordon, the author of The Eat-a-Bug Cookbook takes us on an adventure in entomophagy [eating bugs], and prepare yourself for the next big revolution in food production – using crickets, mealworms, and other eco-friendly alternatives to meat. The program concludes with free samples of edible insect snacks for everyone who attends.

About David George Gordon
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‘Non-synthetic’ food colours: Acceptable compromise or too far from nature?

‘Non-synthetic’ food colours: Acceptable compromise or too far from nature? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

The firm claims the pigment has “superb” stability. It brands the insoluble combination of silica and iron oxide as a “mineral-based and non-artificial dye alternative” to synthetic colours like Allura Red (E 129)and non-vegan pigments like Carmine (E 120).

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