Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
162.9K views | +62 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Ana C. Day
onto Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Scoop.it!

Edible insects a boon to Thailand's farmers

Edible insects a boon to Thailand's farmers | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
THANON NANG KLARN, Thailand (AP) - In a story Aug. 25 about insects being raised for food around the world, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the first cricket farm in the United States will open this year in Youngstown, Pennsylvania. The farm is in Youngstown, Ohio, and is now operating.
more...
No comment yet.
Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Diary of a Bugs Journey - Invenire Market Intelligence

Diary of a Bugs Journey - Invenire Market Intelligence | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Can edible bugs have a real impact? Insects need to become big. For our sake, and for our planet. Follow our journey to revolutionise food production
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Edible insects is just one dream. And just one journey.

Taking up the challenge to create a better future is not a simple journey. There are challenges, hurdles and tests of commitment.

But the journey is also one of growth, new skills and deeper understanding. The path contains new friends and partners with common visions. And the destination is a better world with your dream a reality.

 

Anyone can be a Leader. You just have to start your journey."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Creepy Crawlies: The Health Benefits of Eating Bugs & Why We Should Do It More Often

Creepy Crawlies: The Health Benefits of Eating Bugs & Why We Should Do It More Often | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Our gluttonous diets, which have led to unprecedented levels of health issues, have also led us to the brink of humanitarian and environmental catastrophe. The over-consumption of beef and pork means that of the 78 million acres of rainforest that are chopped down every year, around half is for livestock grazing, which is the greatest contributor of greenhouse gasses. Our dietary habits have to change.

There is one solution that has been backed by nearly every governing body charged with the question of sustainability – eat bugs. Just reading the sentence is enough to make most people shudder and recoil. However, incorporating insects into our diet is not only good for the planet, but it is also great for our health. So why is there such a strong stigma against doing so?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

These are the 12 strangest secret snacks you can order on Amazon

These are the 12 strangest secret snacks you can order on Amazon | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
You can taste unusual delicacies from all over the world
One spicy chocolate bar contains ghost pepper, the world's hottest chilli 
Bacon obsessives can eat their favourite breakfast treat in sweet form
Brave shoppers can even try scorpion lollipops and tinned tarantula
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Like it or loathe it, global giant Amazon dominates the online delivery market with its enormous range of products - selling everything from groceries and furniture to car parts and clothes.

But with such a huge stock, some of the most intriguing and unusual food items in the world can fall below the radar.

So you don't miss out, FEMAIL has rounded up 12 secret sweets and snacks you can find on Amazon if you know where to look - including truffle crisps, green tea Kit Kats and even tinned tarantula."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Insects crawl onto the menu in Cornwall - MeatInfo

Insects crawl onto the menu in Cornwall - MeatInfo | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Cornwall can expect to get something a little bit different as the county prepares for its Great Cornish Food Festival. 

Taking place from 23-25 September in Truro’s Lemon Quay, the festival will welcome 100 different food experts, chefs and producers to celebrate Cornish produce.

Although traditional foods will be available, attendees can expect something different to this year’s festival, in the form of edible insects. Former university lecturer Fred McVittie from Cornish Edible Insects will be at the event to showcase how the likes of meal worms, cricket flour and other insects can be used for cooking.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Edible Crickets: Consumer Survey

Edible Crickets: Consumer Survey | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Edible Crickets: Consumer Survey
Please note that although there are many sections, the entire survey should take less than 5 minutes to complete!
This survey's main aim is to determine the consumer point of view on the market for cricket flour in North America.

Thank you very much for filling it out; it will provide very important data for a big paper that I must write!

* Required
What country are you from? *
Canada
United States of America
What state/province are you from? *
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Roasted crickets for dinner, anyone?

Protein choices at a meal usually include fish, beef or chicken. Maybe tofu, if the chef wants to make vegetarians happy. 

Next week, Scratch Food & Beverage will dish up a different kind of option: crickets and mealworms.

On Aug. 31, the Troy Hill restaurant is hosting the city’s first-ever insect dinner party with a four-course menu by executive chef Matt Petruna that will shine a spotlight on the six-legged creepy crawlies and slithering larvae that most Americans consider unpalatable.

The word “think” is important, because roasted crickets and mealworms actually can taste quite delicious if they’re prepared right, says owner Don Mahaney. For his dinner, that means insects that have been processed into a tofu-like block that can be used as an egg, dairy, meat or soy replacement.

“It’s very similar to ground beef,” Mr. Mahaney says.

They’re also extremely nutritious, offering both protein and a good source of unsaturated fat. Insects also supply a small amount of iron and other minerals, depending on size. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Is it Time to Start Eating Insects?

Estimates say that insects form a part of the traditional diets of at least 2 billion people, according to a study conducted by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Yet, here in Western countries, bugs continue to carry a certain negative stigma, as shown in our modern culture and mainstream media. Picture the scene in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom where Willie sarcastically responds, “I had bugs for lunch,” while witnessing a crawly dinner scene in the Pankot Palace. That apprehension is rooted more in misguided methodology than real facts or personal experience.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

BUGS in Denmark: nationwide in 50 cinemas with DOXBIO

BUGS in Denmark: nationwide in 50 cinemas with DOXBIO | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
This September we will collaborate with DOXBIO in order to make BUGS widely available to the Danish people – in cinemas all over the country. Every year, distribution initiative DOXBIO showcases six documentary films in collaboration with a nationwide network of cinemas. It’s DOXBIO’s mission to bring documentaries to big screens all over the country – not just the big cities.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Edible Insects Market: Global Analysis, Size, Share, Value, Demand, Market Growth By 2024

Edible Insects Market: Global Analysis, Size, Share, Value, Demand, Market Growth By 2024 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In terms of value, the global edible insects market is anticipated to expand at a CAGR of 6.1% during the forecast period and is expected to account for US$ 722.9 Mn by 2024 end. Orthoptera (cricket, grasshopper, and locusts) segment is projected to register a CAGR of 8.1% over the forecast period, driven by rising demand for cricket granola bars, cricket crackers, cricket cookies, and cricket chocolates. Of the various edible insect type products, the beetle's segment is estimated to account for approximately 30.8% share of the global market share in 2016, and caterpillars segment is estimated to account for 17.9% share. 

In the APAC region, beetles segment accounted for largest market share at 34.1% in 2015. Revenue contribution by this segment to the APAC edible insect market is expected to increase at a CAGR of 5.2% from 2016 to 2024. In terms of value, the beetles segment in the Europe edible insects market accounted for 29.0% share in 2015. Demand for edible insects in countries in Europe is on
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Edible Insects of Northeast India - Springer

Edible Insects of Northeast India - Springer | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract
Insects play an important role in the dietary system of various ethnic groups of northeastern states of India. They provide nutritional security and cure various body ailments. The number of edible insects eaten in a state varies with the land and tribes. The ethnic people of Arunachal Pradesh consume about 158 species of insects, whereas tribes of Nagaland consume only 42 species of insects. The members of various tribes choose the edible insects on the basis of their traditional belief, taste and regional and seasonal availability. This chapter outlines various insect species eaten by various tribes, the association of these insects with social and cultural belief and their importance in medicine and economy of these states.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Grub Launches Energy Bar Made with Cricket Powder - The Food Rush

Grub Launches Energy Bar Made with Cricket Powder - The Food Rush | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The energy bars are packed full of natural goodness, and an extra special ingredient: cricket powder. Crickets are incredibly high in protein, iron and calcium and contain all nine essential amino acids. They are rightly being talked about as the food of the future and they’re here now, in a handy-sized snack bar.

The Eat Grub Bar comes in two flavours: cranberry and orange, and coconut and cacao. Both are packed full of protein but also packed full of flavour. Alongside the cricket powder, the bars contain whole ingredients such as sunflower seeds, currants, chopped dates, gluten free oat-bran, goji berries and pumpkin seeds. These added ingredients give the bars some really great texture as well as fantastic flavour.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Are Crickets The New Lobster? The Case For Eating Insects

Are Crickets The New Lobster? The Case For Eating Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Some think Americans will develop a taste for creepy-crawlies, just as we learned to enjoy other foods we once scorned. In 1876, the lobsters that were abundant along the coastlines of North America were still being used as fertilizer for farmland; in Eastern Canada, “they boil them for their pigs, but are ashamed to be seen eating lobster themselves,” wrote the essayist John Rowan at the time. Lobster shells inside a house would be seen as evidence of “poverty and degradation,” he said.
So could the day come when people see our aversion to eating bugs as an unenlightened cultural oddity of our time?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Insects: The Grossly Sustainable Future of Food

Insects: The Grossly Sustainable Future of Food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Many cultures already include this ingredient in their daily diets, but for most of the Western world, the very thought of ingesting it brings on a montage of involuntary facial expressions. But this one divisive ingredient may just be the future of food.

Of course, I’m talking about insects. I spoke with Lara Hanlon of éntomo, an organization purporting the value of entomophagy (the practice of eating insects) by providing information, stats, and recipes.

In an effort to understand a little better why it’s good for our global wallets, welfare, and taste-buds, here are some reasons why insects might just be our saviors.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Nature Walks In Mashpee Focus On Insects And Edible Plants

Several guided walks through conservation lands in Mashpee are upcoming. The walks are sponsored by the Mashpee Conservation Department and are free for everyone.

A Besse Bog hike is planned for 9 AM tomorrow, Saturday, August 27. Participants will enjoy a walk around a cranberry bog/vernal pool to explore the plant and animal life found therein. Directions from the Mashpee rotary are to take Great Neck Road North, turn right onto Route 130 and look for the Besse Bog Conservation Area sign and parking area on the left, just past South Sandwich Road. Hikers should wear shoes that can get wet.

A Wild Edible and Medicinal Plants walk will take place at 9 AM on Monday, August 29. Participants will join a naturalist for a wild edible and medicinal plants tour of the Mashpee River Woodlands North. Directions from the Mashpee Rotary are to take Route 28 toward Hyannis and take the first right onto Quinaquisset Avenue. North parking area is off Quinaquisset Avenue on the right.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Forget meat and dairy, we need to shift proteins

Forget meat and dairy, we need to shift proteins | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Think protein and what comes to mind? Meat, milk or fish? An irreplaceable part of any diet, protein takes gold in many other foods as well: foods that may have to become staples of the western diet in the coming years.
Simply put, how we’ve produced and consumed protein over at least the past half century has had some catastrophic social, environmental and economic impacts around the globe, and a hard rain is gonna fall.
While carbohydrates fuel the engine room of energy production, protein allows for the growth, maintenance and repair of our muscle and body tissue. Protein sources vary in their ability to provide us with the essential amino acids we need: while animal sources provide the full range of essential amino acids, some plants, such as soy and quinoa, do too.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Crickets are raised to be eaten at ASPIRE farm in Austin, Texas

Crickets are raised to be eaten at ASPIRE farm in Austin, Texas | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Nearly 80 percent of the world's population eats insects, and yet, the U.S. is still relatively squeamish to the idea. ASPIRE farm in Austin, Texas is trying to change that. The farm is the only of its kind -- a commercial farm where they grow crickets intended solely for human consumption. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Elsevier Publishes "Insects as Sustainable Food Ingredients: Production, Processing and Food Applications"

Elsevier Publishes "Insects as Sustainable Food Ingredients: Production, Processing and Food Applications" | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Comprehensive reference describes how insects can be mass produced and incorporated into the world's food supply at an industrial and cost-effective scale
CAMBRIDGE, MA--(Marketwired - August 25, 2016) - Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, today announced the publication of Insects as Sustainable Food Ingredients: Production, Processing and Food Applications, edited by Aaron T. Dossey, Juan Morales-Ramos and M. Guadalupe Rojas. This book provides valuable guidance on how to build insect-based agriculture, food and biomaterials industries.
A pioneer in the industry, Dr. Dossey has brought together a team of international experts who effectively summarize the current state of the art, providing helpful recommendations upon which readers can build companies, products and research programs. Researchers, entrepreneurs, farmers, policymakers and anyone interested in insect mass production and the industrial use of insects will benefit from the content in this comprehensive reference.
Read the introductory chapter from the book.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Silicon Valley’s power brain food: Crickets

Silicon Valley’s power brain food: Crickets | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
SAN JOSE, Calif. — For Bay Area techies attuned to the latest trends, kale is no longer cutting it and quinoa is passe. Instead, many are opting for a six-legged snack.
In startup offices around the region, people are munching on crickets.
Proponents say the tiny, chirping bugs are high in protein and iron and can serve as a sustainable alternative to beef or chicken. It's a movement that has people buzzing, with companies such as San Francisco-based Bitty Foods baking the bugs into cookies and chips, Tiny Farms in San Leandro breeding crickets for mass consumption, and New York-based Exo using them in protein bars. The products are showing up in Silicon Valley break rooms, and investors and entrepreneurs are paying close attention.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Grubbly Farms Takes On Food Sustainability with Flies - Hypepotamus

Grubbly Farms Takes On Food Sustainability with Flies - Hypepotamus | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Grubbly Farms, an innovative food startup, takes on our current food sustainability problem with the help of black soldier flies. The startup sells the fly’s dehydrated larvae as a more sustainable protein and fat-heavy animal feed. They are transforming the industry.

In 2015, Georgia Tech graduates and cousins Sean Warner and Patrick Pittaluga ordered 700 larvae of black soldier flies from Amazon and started growing them after reading about the large cultivation of insects in Europe and Asia. Warner and Pittaluga feed pre-consumer food waste from local organizations to the flies and as they eat it, the flies convert it into quality fertilizer. The larvae the flies produce is then harvested, dehydrated and sold as backyard chicken treats.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

This year's Great Cornish Food Festival has added crunch

This year's Great Cornish Food Festival has added crunch | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

By West Briton West Briton  |  Tue 23 Aug 2016
Among the traditional treats on offer in the huge Food Hall at this year's Great Cornish Food Festival will be some interesting new additions… Insects.

Yep, you read that right. Next to the fancy sausages, artisan cheese, beer, cider and cake creations, will be bugs.

As in BUGS.

Former university lecturer Fred McVittie from Cornish Edible Insects will be at the event highlighting just how meal worms, cricket flour and other insects can be used to create a veritable bug banquet.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Musadye zitete: Malawians warned to keep away from ‘locusts’ | Malawi24 - All the latest Malawi news

Musadye zitete: Malawians warned to keep away from ‘locusts’ | Malawi24 - All the latest Malawi news | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
According to Illovo, there is a high chance that some of the locusts being sold in the market are the ones that they killed after they invaded their field. Such insects have been said to contain harmful poison which can in turn kill people.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Last month state President Peter Mutharika was accused of telling Malawians that they should be eating insects as a way of beating the hunger situation in the country. Government spokesperson Patricia Kaliati said that the President was only joking on the issue."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

2016 CNE Menu Includes Bug Dogs, Beetle Juice and Pig Ear Sandwiches - Chew Boom

2016 CNE Menu Includes Bug Dogs, Beetle Juice and Pig Ear Sandwiches - Chew Boom | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Here’s a closer look at some of this year’s CNE culinary curiosities:

BUG BISTRO: Bug Bistro will be presenting its “bug-worthy” menu starring the Bug Dog: a hormone-free beef frank seasoned with crispy mustard crickets; Tacos Grillos: flour tortilla tacos with chipotle fried beef sirloin and toasted chilli lime crickets; and a Beetle Juice packed mango pulp, fresh lime, buttermilk and protein from roasted mealworm powder. (Bug Bistro, Food Building)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Cricket tortillas, anyone?

Cricket tortillas, anyone? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
It's not chewy, there's no horrible aftertaste, and no legs are sticking out of the sides.

In fact, it's quite the opposite: It's crispy, delicate, golden brown.

And filled with crickets.

Mexico restaurant in Hamilton has welcomed a new item to its menu, cricket tortillas.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

The Future of Sports Nutrition May Contain Insects

The Future of Sports Nutrition May Contain Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
What do you get when you combine a shared passion for outdoor sports, nature, and healthy food? Fit people. Fit people who have great ideas… like making protein bars out of crickets.

William Walcker, Minh-Anh Pham, and Antoine Domergue are the three men who woke up one morning and decided they would make protein bars out of crickets. Kidding – it’s a much more interesting story than that.  I had the pleasure of speaking with Minh to hear a little more about how he went from triathlete to cricket evangelist.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Santo Remedio serves up ‘proper’ Mexican street food - including grasshoppers

Santo Remedio serves up ‘proper’ Mexican street food - including grasshoppers | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
You’re going to be ok, it’s like eating peanuts,” my friend coaxed me, as I contemplated spooning the grasshoppers past my lips, which were on top of the guacamole sitting in front of me in Santo Remedio.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"....felt genuinely nervous at the prospect of eating the protein-rich fried insects – despite knowing it would be a noble practice to adopt, and could eradicate world hunger if everyone followed suit.

I wouldn’t say the consistency was nutty, but they were certainly crunchy - and the fact they were accompanied by one of the best guacamoles I’d ever tasted eased the experience."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Bug restaurant scoops award for local produce

Bug restaurant scoops award for local produce | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A ST Davids restaurant which serves up edible insects is one of two north Pembrokeshire businesses who have been congratulated for the outstanding quality of their food or drink in the annual Pembrokeshire Produce Mark Awards.
The Grub Kitchen was one of two winners of Best Use of Local Produce in a Hospitality Outlet.
Gwaun Valley Meats, which started out as a small family-run butchers firm in 2003, won the Best Online Marketing of Pembrokeshire Produce award.
The winners were presented with their awards at the Pembrokeshire Agricultural Show, yesterday (Wednesday).
Best-known for dishing up delicacies involving insects, Grub Kitchen at St Davids also promotes sustainable local produce.
Run by chef Andy Holcroft, Grub Kitchen is located on The Bug Farm, a working farm research centre and visitor attraction in St Davids that provides the restaurant with the majority of the produce its serves, such as Welsh Black beef, Welsh lamb and a range of vegetables.
more...
No comment yet.