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Startups Pitch Cricket Flour As The Best Protein You Could Eat

Startups Pitch Cricket Flour As The Best Protein You Could Eat | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Cricket flour is a thing, and it's showing up in protein bars and baked goods. A few companies are testing the water to see if Americans can get on board with cricket as an alternative to meat or soy.
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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CLICK HERE to support Roadmap: Edible insects & business opportunities

CLICK HERE to support Roadmap: Edible insects & business opportunities | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Exploring the possible markets and business opportunities insects have as food and protein sources. | Crowdfunding is a democratic way to support the fundraising needs of your community. Make a contribution today!
Ana C. Day's insight:
Via this campaign, we want to do 2 important things:

In order to really matter and make a difference, the edible insects industry needs to reach much bigger consumer groups than today. We think that for it to achieve a wide sustainability impact, it needs a roadmap. 

That is why we’ve started this campaign – we want to do two important things:



  1. Produce and publish a business opportunity report. The aim of the work is to present a clear view of where the edible insects market is right now, but most importantly, show the roadmap of how it can develop forward into a more mainstream market with greater positive impact. 
  2. Support the little team of 4Ento in their important educational work to increase awareness and familiarise people with edible insects so that more and more people become aware of the opportunities edible insects provide, and also dare to try insects themselves! If we in some way can help change makers like 4Ento in their quest for more sustainable – responsible business – we’ll do our best!
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Buggin' Out

Buggin' Out | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In the United States, insects are typically viewed as pests that gross us out, but 80 percent of the world consumes them on a regular basis—they’re even considered a delicacy in some cultures. And as our worldwide population continues to expand, making sure that everyone has access to nutritious food is a growing challenge. Here at home, for example, one in five Texas households is considered food insecure, meaning they lack access to adequate food because of a shortage of financial or other material resources. To address this problem, many food experts are encouraging folks in the U.S. to consider insects as part of their regular diet.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"In short, insects are tiny packages full of proteins and vitamins. And, when compared to other animals that are raised for human consumption, insects require fewer resources, such as land, water, feed and energy. Plus, they emit less waste, i.e., greenhouse gases. But can Americans ever get past the negative connotation associated with consuming insects to consider them a viable food source? Many people think so, as insect-based food startups are popping up from coast to coast. In fact, you don’t have to travel far to find a few, because a hub of bug-munchers exists right here in Austin."

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Blogs & Commentary: What will we be eating in 2050?

Blogs & Commentary: What will we be eating in 2050? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Leading food watchers share their visions of what consumers will be munching on and swigging in the decades ahead.
Ana C. Day's insight:
Kara Nielsen, Sterling-Rice Group

Familiar foods but different ingredient sources
The merging of traditional food cultures with environmental issues will greatly change where our food comes from and what it is made of, but it will likely still be recognizable to future consumers. 
“Future generations may never bat an eye at insect-fortified snack bars, cookies or simmer sauces as they will have been raised on the stuff, but their parents will still be seeking analogs for the foods they recognize and know. That is the enduring culture part.”

Marc Halperin, CCD Innovation

Proteins shift from animal to plant, insect
The winners in 2050 will be GMOs, edible packaging and kiosk-style fresh food prep machines.
“The Western antipathy toward insects as part of the diet will wane, out of necessity, and proteins derived from those sources will be incorporated into foods effectively and invisibly.”

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Insectes comestibles en Afrique : Introduction à la collecte, au mode de préparation et à la consommation des insectes

Insectes comestibles en Afrique : Introduction à la collecte, au mode de préparation et à la consommation des insectes | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Les insectes comestibles sont un ingrédient courant des plats traditionnels de nombreuses parties de l’Afrique, un continent abritant plus de 250 espèces d’insectes potentiellement comestibles. Ils fournissent des protéines animales de bonne qualité et sont riches en lipides et en macronutriments. Cet Agrodok explique où trouver et comment collecter et préparer 10 espèces différentes d’insectes appartenant à 5 groupes : chenilles, coléoptères, termites, sauterelles et grillons. Il s'inspire d'informations rassemblées sur le terrain et développées ensuite par les chercheurs locaux qui étudient la place des insectes dans le régime alimentaire humain. Les informations contenues dans cet Agrodok répondent à l’objectif d’Agromisa de favoriser la consommation d’insectes comestibles pour garantir l’accès à des quantités suffisantes d’alimentation nutritive.

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Discover in exclusivity in Brussels a cocktail with insects! - Crystal Lounge

Discover in exclusivity in Brussels a cocktail with insects! - Crystal Lounge | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Discover this cocktail with an assortment of unique spreads.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The Magritte Cocktail is made of dark rum, orange juice, Schweppes and rosemary. From there everything seems ‘normal’… Surprisingly you will discover on the sides an assortment of spreads based on darkling beetles with tomato, chocolate and carrot.

A toast of thyme and rosemary shaped as a butterfly will also enlighten the surrealist side of this creation. To top it all off, enjoy a skewer roasted caterpillars!"

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Milkshakes made with crickets

Milkshakes made with crickets | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A milkshake on a summer day is delicious. But this isn't your run of the mill shake. It has a little something extra. Can you believe it? Crickets. Wayback Burger in Canarsie, Brooklyn, is serving ...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Wayback Burgers in Canarsie, Brooklyn, is serving up an Oreo mud pie cricket protein milkshake made with Peruvian chocolate-flavored cricket powder.

Wayback, a national chain, tested out the cricket milkshake in the spring. It was so popular that it brought back the insect-infused shake through the summer.

Another unique flavor is the jerky milkshake. It has barbeque hickory smoked and maple spices and Slim Jims jerky."

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Eat Mor Bugs - YouTube

A growing number of "entopreneurs" are starting businesses that sell foods made from crickets, mealworms and other edible insects.
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▶ Liver, Lobster and Locusts: How Bizarre Foods Win Acceptance - YouTube

From the 2014 New York Times Food for Tomorrow Conference. Greg Sewitz, co-founder of Exo, a company that is pioneering the consumption of insect protein . T...
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Beetles for Breakfast

Beetles for Breakfast | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Over 1900 species of insects are commonly eaten by humans, as well as a couple of spiders and scorpions. Many of these species are seen as delicacies by some cultures: fried and buttered tarantulas...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"In short, insects are consumed the world over, and for good reason: they’re a great source of protein, which in some parts of the world would otherwise be missing from people’s diets, as well as fats and fibre. The protein content by dry weight of crickets is around 65%- by comparison, athletes’ protein powders consist of 70-95% protein. Beef is less than 40%. Insects also supply loads of essential amino acids, vitamins and minerals and as such are much more nutritious than most conventional meats. They live alongside humans in large numbers without needing to be cared for, can be caught with your bare hands and don’t need to be cooked. They’re basically walking snacks."

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Bientôt des pâtes à base d'insectes dans vos assiettes

Bientôt des pâtes à base d'insectes dans vos assiettes | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Deux milliards d'êtres humains consomment déjà des insectes dans le monde. Micronutris croit au développement de ce marché en France. Cette start-up vient de lancer une opération de crowdfunding sur Wiseed pour se développer.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Des biscuits salés, des macarons, des insectes apéritif aromatisés au thym, façon méditerranéenne et pourquoi pas bientôt au pop-corn. Micronutris ne manque pas d'idées pour faire apprécier les insectes que la start-up élève. L'entreprise a vu le jour en 2011, son site pilote à Toulouse est opérationnel depuis 2 ans. Il en sort une tonne d'insectes par mois. Pour Micronutris, la qualité est la priorité. Tous les lots sont analysés et tracés. Une réponse de Cédric Auriol, le fondateur de l'entreprise aux doutes soulevés par une récente étude de l'ANSES. L'agence recommande en effet la prudence mettant en avant la présence éventuelle de substances chimiques ou d'allergènes dans les insectes."

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Got Crickets? The New Protein Supplement

Supplementing your diet with insects doesn't seem like a totally appetizing way to get in your protein, but when these creepy crawly's are ground into flour and baked into a cookie that looks like ...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Protein derived from these multi-legged chirping creatures is getting a lot of attention recently. There are also several companies capitalizing on this new, more sustainable protein source. So what’s all the fuss?"

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Insect protein market has enthusiasm & sustainability – now it needs a business plan

Insect protein market has enthusiasm & sustainability – now it needs a business plan | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

The insect protein market has been relying on its youthful enthusiasm and faith in sustainability but it needs a solid business plan to move forward, says Invenire as it seeks crowdfunding for its edible insect roadmap.

The report due this summer seeks to give a snapshot of the current market in terms of products, players and both consumer and regulatory challenges. Invenire Market Intelligence aimed to raise $50,000 (€44,785) in crowdfunding for the report , which marked its first break away from regular papers commissioned by clients.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"Speaking with NutraIngredients, author of the report Johanna Tanhuanpää said: “The whole edible insects industry is so new and it’s in such an embryonic state. There’s a lot of enthusiasm, there’s a lot of people who are very into edible insects or sustainability. And sometimes that just means there’s not all that much business thinking as this enthusiasm and drive to make it into something mainstream.”

Edible insects have been lauded over the past few years as a sustainable source of protein as global demand for the macronutrient increases and concerns grow over the environmental impact of traditional animal and even plant sources. While this sustainability message was important, Tanhuanpää said this gave the consumers a reason why they should buy insect products but not necessarily why they would want to eat them.  "

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The three insect species in the draft of the new Swiss food law - YouTube

22nd of june 2015 is a historic day for Swiss food law. The biggest and most diverse group of animals is now also listed as food in switzerland : insects.
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Bingham and Jones's curator insight, June 30, 7:15 AM

amazing progress! lets hope the rest of the world follows suit

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How to Keep People From Bugging Out About Eating Insects

How to Keep People From Bugging Out About Eating Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Years ago in a South American rainforest, the researcher I was visiting announced with something like joy that he had just found some palm beetle grubs. They were fat, yellow, and the length of my fingers, and when we sautéed them with garlic in a frying pan, the skins took on a lovely al dente chewiness around the creamy interiors. They were delicious—and I ate just one.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"If you really want people to start eating insects, says Shelomi, you should start by persuading supermarkets to put “bags of cricket meal, bottles of termite oil, or loaves of insect flour bread” on their shelves, with recipes, “making them available for consumers to try on their own time in their own homes on their own terms.” Instead of pushing insects as alternatives to meat, a failed strategy, promoters should position them as alternatives to nuts, which they already resemble “in their texture, macronutrient content, and even flavor.”"

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Insetti a uso alimentare: la Svizzera verso la vendita

Insetti a uso alimentare: la Svizzera verso la vendita | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insetti a uso alimentare: la Svizzera verso la commercializzazione di tre specie. Lo prevedono le nuove ordinanze sulle derrate alimentari
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Adesso con le nuove ordinanze si prevede la commercializzazione di tutti gli alimenti che rispettano le norme compresi gli insetti. Per la prima volta, si prevede di ammettere come derrate alimentari tre specie : Tenebrio molitor nella fase larvale, Acheta domesticusLocusta migratoria."

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The Pre-hispanic all bug tasting at the re-vamped Casa de los Tacos GOODFOODMEXICOCITY

The Pre-hispanic all bug tasting at the re-vamped Casa de los Tacos GOODFOODMEXICOCITY | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Hector Ramos
Ana C. Day's insight:

"That’s why La Casa de los Tacos is like a breath of mezcal-perfumed air. A seemingly ordinary fonda on first glance, it turns out to be anything but. From 1970 on La Casa’s owner cranked out serviceable comida corridas. Then she decided to retire and the space was taken over by two creative types with a vision. Hector Ramos, a photographer who runs an art gallery upstairs and Alejandro Escalante, author of the renowned Tacopedia and editor of online gastronomic journal animalgourmet.com are beyond ‘hipster’ age: “Perhaps that’s why we’re here, and not in La Roma” chuckled Ramos over a smoky Machincuepa mezcal, recently."

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Noticias UCR | Estudiantes de UCR crean productos a base de insectos

Noticias UCR | Estudiantes de UCR crean productos a base de insectos | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
UCR busca solución al problema que presenta súper bacteria
Ana C. Day's insight:

"El primer equipo integrado por las jóvenes Gloriana Herrera, Ximena González, Yock Mei Acón, Ana María Quirós, Valeria Brenes, Valerie Rangel y Marcela Rodríguez, desarrolló Molibannann, una premezcla seca nutritiva a base de harina de plátano y larvas de un insecto denominado Tenebrio molitor, para atender a la población infantil haitiana en desnutrición."

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LA cricket farm tries to raise funds, falls short

LA cricket farm tries to raise funds, falls short | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Coalo Valley Farms, California's first edible cricket farm, missed its goal this month to raise money on Kickstarter.
Ana C. Day's insight:

We will come back ;) !!

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Eating Well in Asheville

Eating Well in Asheville | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

At the hot Mexican restaurant Limones, your "Mayan margarita" glass is crusted with chapulin salt, "chapulin" made of dried, ground crickets. Down at a nearby farmers market, Cricket Girl sells cricket-based protein bars and is aiming for veggie packed smoothies thickened with her insect protein-flour combination. Toto... we're not in Brooklyn anymore.

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▶ Take the edible bug challenge! - YouTube

https://youtu.be/uFkna1uCBqw
Ana C. Day's insight:

Published on Jun 30, 2015

Would you eat insects? Those brave enough at this years Lincolnshire Show ate some unusual snacks to help raise awareness of alternative protein sources.

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Ask the Food Doc: Crickets, medium rare, please : The (402)/411

Ask the Food Doc: Crickets, medium rare, please : The (402)/411 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Q: I’ve been hearing about using insects as food. Is this true and if so, will they will be labeled?

A: Imagine a food source that contains high quality protein, is low in calories and is a good source of healthy fats and fiber. Add to that, it’s plentiful, easy to produce, and cheap. It is all natural, has interesting flavors and there are lots of recipes. It’s a perfect food, right?

Well, except for one minor detail. This is, of course, the subject of your question -- namely, insects as food.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"Assuming you are still reading, maybe you will be consoled by the fact that humans have been eating insects for tens of thousands of years. Or that almost a third of the world’s population are insectivores and include insects as part of their regular diet. That includes many Westernized countries in Europe and the Americas. Earlier this year, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization suggested that all of us should consider adding insects to our diets"

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Insects could solve hunger - YouTube

Lee Cadesky, the COO of C-fu Foods, explains on how insects could solve hunger. Please LIKE & SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed! http://bit.ly/1G7yMhG **More info & v...

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The bug revolution is nigh: Burger chain to serve cricket powder milkshakes

The bug revolution is nigh: Burger chain to serve cricket powder milkshakes | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The limited-edition Oreo mud pie shake will be available starting July 1
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Salon’s Sustainability writers (Lindsay Abrams and myself) have been longtime proponents of the promise bugs hold as protein sources of the future. The only thing is, when we actually tried them, we weren’t totally sold on their taste. The bugs we tried were baked into orangey cookies and gummy protein bars — why couldn’t they be integrated into something we actually liked, like french fries or a milkshake or whatever?"

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Cricket Protein Milk Shakes Are the Frosty Ticket to Sustainabilty

Cricket Protein Milk Shakes Are the Frosty Ticket to Sustainabilty | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A Connecticut-based burger chain is pioneering a creepy-crawly new dessert that may have positive environmental impacts.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The bug-infused confection started out as an April Fools’ joke, CNBC reports, but the online response was so positive that the chain decided to add it to the menu for a test run. Even though the item was only available for a few days, Wayback president John Eucalitto said people were lining up out the door to get their hands on one. After several months of testing, experimenting with 20 or 30 variations of the recipe, the company settled on a Peruvian chocolate cricket protein powder and were ready to bring the creepy-crawly dessert nationwide."

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Can Eating Insects Save the World? | Society of Biology blog

Can Eating Insects Save the World? | Society of Biology blog | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

At the Brussels airport last week, en route to Glasgow, I struck up a conversation with a young Flemish woman about edible insects, as one does. I was on my way to the Glasgow Science Festival to be a part the Society of Biology’s event, ‘Can Eating Insects Save the World?’ The woman told me about a young daughter of a friend of hers who wanted to buy some edible insects at one of the city’s big grocery stores.

Ana C. Day's insight:

".... Although insects are eaten in other parts of the world, such as Thailand, most of us have been brought up to regard them as dirty, dangerous, and downright disgusting. They are simply not part of Europe’s food culture. Unless you count Casu Marzu, a traditional Sardinian sheep milk cheese that contains live maggots.

But, recently, in Brussels at least, the insects have landed.

According to an article last year in Flanders Today, “Entomophagy, or the eating of bugs, is widely regarded as one of the most promising solutions to increasing environmental pressure, worldwide food insecurity and the rising cost of animal protein.”"

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Letting It Fly | NOLA DEFENDER

Letting It Fly | NOLA DEFENDER | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Over Fourth of July, Bug Appetite will be serving Chocolate Chirp Cookies. In the past, they have served things like mealworm salsa and cicada shish kabobs. The eating of bugs is called entomophagy. Smith said that these bugs provide a great source of protein.
 
“Entomophagy is growing in popularity,” she said. “I know some New Orleans restaurants are actually serving dishes with bugs in them as well.”
 
Whether you’re ready to test your palate with bugs or not, Smith said that she really recommends that people check out the event.
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