Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Cricket-based food startup awarded $100,000 by USDA to make bugs tasty

Cricket-based food startup awarded $100,000 by USDA to make bugs tasty | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Dive Brief:

The U.S. Department of Agriculture awarded food startup Bugeater Foods with $100,000 to "find new ways to turn insects into safe, healthful staple food products that taste good," according to Omaha World-Herald. 

If Bugeater's rice-shaped pasta, ramen and macaroni noodles perform well, the company has the chance to receive an additional $600,000 to cover the cost of manufacturing the products for commercial sale.

The Nebraska-based company aims to include as much bug-based nutrition in its products as possible, without compromising their look, taste, and cooking quality. The company will set up taste trials for its insect-based products in the spring, and will also send the food to chefs for critical feedback.
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Tummy bugs - could eating insects be the key to sustainable nutrition - Independent.ie

Tummy bugs - could eating insects be the key to sustainable nutrition - Independent.ie | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In the midst of emotional turmoil and heartbreak, most of us reach for the Haagen-Dazs and wine. Never one to do things by the book, Angelina Jolie is currently bucking the trend with scorpions and tarantulas.
After opening up about how difficult her split from Brad Pitt has been, Angelina has proved that her famous taste for danger is still very much intact on a trip to Cambodia. She and her children happily munched on insects while sampling local delicacies, and the actress seems to know a thing or two about local fare: "I think it's always been a part of the diet, the bugs," she told a BBC reporter this week.
"You start with crickets and a beer and then you kind of move up to tarantulas. It's actually really good, the flavour."

Not everyone is quite as adventurous as the Jolie-Pitt clan, mind. For Ireland, a nation built on the nutritional cornerstones of meat and two veg, entomophagy - the practice of eating insects - belongs squarely in Bushtucker Trials on reality TV. But the likelihood is that it's something we may well need to get used to: it's widely estimated that there will be between nine to 10 billion of us living on earth by the year 2050, meaning that global food shortages will be rife.
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Grubs a delicacy full of nutrients; various spices enhance their flavour

Grubs a delicacy full of nutrients; various spices enhance their flavour | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Visakhapatnam: We spray insecticides when we spot grubs on our lawns or potted plants for fear they may multiply and eat away the greenery. But what is loathed by many are food for some.

Grubs, which are the larvae of moths and beetles, are a prized delicacy in Vizag Agency. In local parlance they’re called ‘Bodengalu’ or ‘Agency Prawns’. They live in tree trunks or plant roots, especially in palm trees. These grubs are cooked using various spices to enhance their flavour and eaten.


The grubs, for long a traditional food item here and in several countries, are now a hit in the West due to the nutrition and proteins they contain. These edible insects are laced with chocolate and other delicious flavors and sold as energy bars in western countries.

Those who have savoured them, praise their subtle flavour. “These ‘Bodengalu’ are really delicious. They taste like mashed eggs when eaten. I make it a point to eat them whenever I visit Vizag Agency if they are available. Unfortunately, nobody cooks these grubs over here. This is another ‘indigenous delicacy’ which we can say is confined to, and is the treasure of the Vizag Agency,” said tribal rights activist Ganjivarapu Srinivas.
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29th annual MSU Bug Buffet set for Feb. 24

29th annual MSU Bug Buffet set for Feb. 24 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Montana State University will host its 29th annual Bug Buffet on Feb. 24 from noon to 4 p.m. in Ballroom A in the Strand Union Building.

The event is meant to help people overcome the psychological aversion to insects as a food source, said founder Florence Dunkel, an MSU plant sciences professor and international expert on edible insects.

The menu will include Galleria Quesadilla, Larval Latkes with Lemon Sour Cream and Galleria, Red Pepper Cricket Tomato Soup with Cricket Croutons, Orzo Cricket Salad, White Chocolate Chip Wax Worm Cookie and Cricket Banana Bread.

Dunkel planned MSU’s first edible insect event almost 30 years ago, making the only entree — Montana grasshoppers sautéed in butter — herself.

Along with various activities, the Bug Buffet will feature Robert Nathan Allen, founder and president of the Texas nonprofit Little Herds Inc., which focuses on edible insects. Allen will offer brief workshops at 12:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. on the use of insects as environmentally sound and economical food and feed.
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Should we eat bugs like Angelina Jolie? - BBC News

Should we eat bugs like Angelina Jolie? - BBC News | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Angelina Jolie cooked up a storm while promoting her latest film in Cambodia by eating bugs with her kids.
The actress was seen frying a scorpion and eating the leg of a spider which she said had a "really good flavour".
Eating creepy crawlies has been long associated with the TV show I'm a Celebrity... Get Me Out Of Here.
But should we all be more like Angelina and swap our bacon for bugs?
Why should we eat more creepy crawlies?
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How eating crickets could help save the planet

How eating crickets could help save the planet | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

The Case for Insects
For edible insects to catch on in the U.S., the masses must first get over the "ick factor," which Bachhuber says isn't as big of a problem as it was just a few years ago. It's important to remember that people from other countries don't necessarily share this knee-jerk reaction. In fact, the FAO estimates that 2 billion people consume insects regularly, and some research suggests that number may be up to three times higher (about 80 percent of Earth's population).

The practice of entomophagy (eating insects) is most common in the tropics, where insects are bountiful throughout the year due to warm temperatures, says Julie Lesnik, an anthropologist at Wayne State University in Michigan who studies entomophagy. Higher latitude areas like much of Europe don't have constant insect exposure that would allow widespread entomophagy to take root, which may have prevented it from developing in North America.

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Gryllies Brings Sustainable, “Future-Friendly” Cricket Protein to the Table-Top – StartUp HERE Toronto

Gryllies Brings Sustainable, “Future-Friendly” Cricket Protein to the Table-Top – StartUp HERE Toronto | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The CEO of Gryllies is hard at work on recipes that integrate cricket flour into conventional dishes like patties and pasta sauces, but if anyone’s asking, Gryllies isn’t just some trendster novel food brand—it was never about the crickets to begin with.

“The mission has always been to make people think about what they’re eating and why they’re eating it before it’s even on their plates,” Jiang explains. Gryllies was conceived last year in Queens’ University’s QCSI program, where its premise of using insect protein as a sustainable and healthful alternative to traditional protein sources like beef or chicken cinched the top prize. Since then, Jiang and her core team of five have been managing a 30-strong team of advisors to tackle anything from recipes, suppliers, social media outreach and product development and make Gryllies a bona fide local player. Starting January 2017, recent converts and the newly curious alike will be able to order cricket-infused pasta sauce or even plain cricket flour off of the Gryllies website.
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Answers To Your Questions On Food, Health And Climate

Answers To Your Questions On Food, Health And Climate | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
7. Is eating insects really a promising alternative to conventional meats?

Traditional diets across Asia, Africa, and Latin America incorporate insects as important sources of protein—often as delicious delicacies! While the act of eating insects is not yet a widely appreciated source of sustainable protein in the western world, with dwindling land, water, and resources and trending environmental-consciousness, insect consumption is more than just a fad; it’s the food of the future.

Tens of millions of dollars has been injected into the edible insect industry across North America and Europe over the past few years and hopefully this belief in sustainable protein production will trickle down to the plates of consumers. – Elliot

8. How many crickets would you have to eat to make the protein gained in beef? Does this offset environmental benefits?

Comparing raw crickets and raw beef, per 100g, crickets have 8-25g of protein while beef has 19-26g of protein. In general, insects require six times less feed than cattle to produce the same amount of protein and emit less greenhouse gasses.

From personal experience and basic research, I say that there are many environmental benefits (less land use, water and feed use, greenhouse gas emissions) of raising crickets compared to traditional techniques of beef production. – Elliot
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Edible insects: will the trend every reflect the buzz it creates?

Edible insects: will the trend every reflect the buzz it creates? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects, although small, offer a high level and far more sustainable form of protein. It is estimated that insects already form part of the diets of at least 2 billion people worldwide (FAO report). Undemanding of water and nutrients, insect farming requires very few raw materials in comparison to animal farming which heavily demands large amounts of land and high levels of raw materials. 

We are able to eat between 80 and 100% of insects bred whereas we only eat 40-60% of cows and others livestock. Insects have a high food conversion rate, for instance crickets need six times less feed than cattle, four times less than sheep, and twice less than pigs and chickens to produce the same amount of protein.

Co-founders of Jimini’s, Bastien and Clément, spotting the health and environmental benefits of insect consumption, made it their mission to integrate insects into the diets of Europeans as well as educate and inform shoppers of this sustainable and, thanks to them, tasty alternative source of protein.  

In addition to obvious environmental plusses, eating insects also has recognised health benefits. Jimini’s edible insects contain high quality protein and calcium with levels comparable to beef and milk. Its ground cricket flour, which is the base of their protein bars, contains 63% protein, more iron than spinach and more calcium than milk.
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Edible Insects Market to Witness US$ 722.9 Mn by 2024 - openPR

Edible Insects Market to Witness US$ 722.9 Mn by 2024 - openPR | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Persistence Market Research (PMR) delivers key insights on the global edible insects market in its upcoming outlook titled, “Edible Insects Market: Global Industry Analysis and Forecast, 2016 – 2024”. In terms of value, the global edible insects market is projected to register a healthy CAGR of 6.1% during the forecast period due to various factors, regarding which PMR offers vital insights in detail.

On the basis of product type, the market is segmented into a product as a whole and product as an ingredient. Product as a whole segment is further sub-segmented into steam or fried, raw and BBQ. As an ingredient segment is sub-segmented into drinks, insect confectionery, snack and baked products, and others. The global market is driven by low capital investment, rapid growth in global population, alternatives for egg and dairy proteins, ease of harvesting and processing, low disease risk and food safety, less land for farming, and lower water consumption.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"On the basis of insect type, the market is segmented into beetles, caterpillar, hymenoptera, orthoptera, tree bugs, and others. Orthoptera and tree bugs segments are expected to account for relatively high CAGRs of 8.1% and 7.3% respectively during the forecast period.  

Insect rearing involves low capital investment as compared to that needed for another conventional livestock rearing such as cattle, swine, and chicken. Substantial increase in global population and decreasing resources are other factors expected to drive demand for alternative food sources. According to United Nations, global population in 2050 is expected to reach 9 billion, significantly outgrowing existing food resources. Insects contain high protein and amino acids and can be a sustainable food source in future."

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Bastien Rabastens - Food Vision

Bastien Rabastens - Food Vision | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
It’s just another food, right?  Why the West will start eating insects
In 2012 Bastien Rabastens ate insects for the first time.  Within a year he and his business partner founded Jimini’s, one of the first insect-based businesses in France.  The company brought its first products to market in 2013 and has experienced 300% growth year-on-year ever since. Today its range of snacks, energy bars and recipe packs is sold across France, the UK, Benelux and Switzerland, marking significant progress towards Jimini’s pan-European ambitions.  Drawing on the Jimini’s experience, Bastien will consider insect appeal, consumer curiosity and the food industry’s insect-based opportunities for innovation.

Getting people to eat insects: Create curiosity, deliver education, reward with great taste, the secrets of Jimini’s marketing success
The insect history of the world: Where taboos come from and why the West needs to reconnect to its insect eating past
Consumer motivation: From an appetite for high-protein nutrition to concern for sustainable agriculture, why consumers will try insects and how to appeal to them
Our insect future: Insights from Jimini’s own R&D lab, what’s next for insect-derived foods?
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The Best Drying Solution for Insects

The Best Drying Solution for Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects are high in protein and fatty acids and are a suitable food source for a range of animals. Dried insects are also easily to transfer and storage are welcomed by insects companies. MAX Industrial Microwave design and manufacture a series of insects microwave drying machine to meet and exceeds most clients’ demands.
 
Black Solider Fly Larva
 
fly species Hermetia illucens, also known as black solider flies (BSF). The BSF is a solitary non pest fly, its pre-pupae are high in protein and fatty acids and are a suitable food source for a range of animals. The black solider fly larva converts organic waste materials to produce high-density populations of pupae that can be used as food for a variety of livestock producers and Suitable for some reptiles, poultry and fish. Also, it alleviates the influence of environmental issues
 
When the farm breeds a large amount of black solider fly larva (BSFL), the farm need an efficient dryer which quickly dry the BSFL then store for further sell. MAX Industrial Microwave machine continuously dry the BSFL from fresh live to the completely dried insects. The whole processing time is only few minutes, and the color of dried insects is kept as the original color.
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What connects crickets, coffee & mushrooms in a sustainable urban food loop? This Danish start-up's protein juice

What connects crickets, coffee & mushrooms in a sustainable urban food loop? This Danish start-up's protein juice | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Bioark helped Insekt KBH operate in a sustainable food loop that involves coffee, mushrooms, tomatoes and crickets (see image).

Lewin Rukov is also the founder of Bugging Denmark an urban cricket farm where the insects are fed partly on mycelia substrate provided by Beyond Coffee, a firm that collects used coffee grinds to grow oyster mushrooms, and partly on apple pulp leftover from Insekt KBH own apple juice production.

The cricket droppings are then re-used as plant fertiliser by urban garden and vegetable producer TagTomat. In this way, different forms of manufacturing residue are 'upcycled' in scalable ecosystems that produce fresh food all year.

Although the crickets in Insekt KBH's juice are currently sourced from Holland (commercial insect farming is not yet legalised in Denmark) the company hopes to ultimately source its crickets from Bugging Denmark. For the minute, the farm organises workshops, lectures and tours showing the general public and private companies how to set up their own insect farms or urban ecosystems.

"It is a two-legged exercise, so to speak. Insekt KBH sells and commodifies, Bugging DK educates and shares vital knowledge," said Price. 

"We do not regard edible insects solely as a business, but as a green movement towards a better world. We want to provide a solution to over-consumption and food waste." 

And cities, with their high density populations and concentrations of food companies, restaurants and supermarkets, are an ideal place to find these solutions.
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How nutritious are crickets? Local students explore edible insects | Islands' Sounder

How nutritious are crickets? Local students explore edible insects | Islands' Sounder | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Are easily-grown insects such as crickets the sustainable food of the future? The United Nations Food & Agriculture Organization thinks so, and promotes international research identifying edible insects and ways of raising them. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently granted hundreds of thousands of dollars to cricket-growers to refine their production and processing methods.

Just how nutritious are crickets? A STEM project in Orcas, Lopez and San Juan Island elementary schools coordinated by Kwiaht, and supported by the Satterberg Family Foundation, has over a hundred local Grade Five and Six students learning hands-on chemistry to find out.
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Global Edible Insects Market to Reach $1.53 Billion in 2021 - Analysis By Segments, Types of Insect & Regions - Research and Markets

Global Edible Insects Market to Reach $1.53 Billion in 2021 - Analysis By Segments, Types of Insect & Regions - Research and Markets | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
This 2016 Market Analysis and Forecasting Report on Edible Insects provides insights into key market requirements gathered from consumers, stores, retail outlets, and shops and their preferences, priorities and perception of commercially available edible insects. The study also covers key adoption factors such as user preferences on palate, tastes, age groups, consumption patterns, and coatings.

The Edible Insects market report provides an in-depth analysis on the market size and forecasts of the variety of segments of commercial available edible insects and bugs, including market opportunities across the globe.

The market for edible insects is segmented into three categories - Segments, Insect Types and Regions.

By Segments - the market size and forecasts for edible insects is provided by four segment types - Raw, Coated, Powdered, and Paste. Coated is further segmented by Bars, Candy, Chocolate, Cookies, Chips, Crackers, Snack Packs and Others. Powdered is further segmented by Flour, Baking Powder, Protein Powder, Salts and Others.
By Types of Insect - Beetles; Caterpillars; Bees, Wasps and Ants; Grasshoppers, Locusts and Crickets; Cicadas, Plant Hoppers, Scale Insects, True bugs; Termites; Dragonflies; Flies; Others.
By Regions - the market size and forecasts are provided for 5 regions - North America, Europe, Middle-East & Africa, Central/Latin America and Asia-Pacific.
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Ecosystem Services from Edible Insects in Agricultural Systems: A Review

Ecosystem Services from Edible Insects in Agricultural Systems: A Review | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract
Many of the most nutritionally and economically important edible insects are those that are harvested from existing agricultural systems. Current strategies of agricultural intensification focus predominantly on increasing crop yields, with no or little consideration of the repercussions this may have for the additional harvest and ecology of accompanying food insects. Yet such insects provide many valuable ecosystem services, and their sustainable management could be crucial to ensuring future food security. This review considers the multiple ecosystem services provided by edible insects in existing agricultural systems worldwide. Directly and indirectly, edible insects contribute to all four categories of ecosystem services as outlined by the Millennium Ecosystem Services definition: provisioning, regulating, maintaining, and cultural services. They are also responsible for ecosystem disservices, most notably significant crop damage. We argue that it is crucial for decision-makers to evaluate the costs and benefits of the presence of food insects in agricultural systems. We recommend that a key priority for further research is the quantification of the economic and environmental contribution of services and disservices from edible insects in agricultural systems. View Full-Text
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Insect eating exhibit at National Craft Gallery Kilkenny could bug you

Insect eating exhibit at National Craft Gallery Kilkenny could bug you | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Fancy chewing on a grasshopper pie? Would you tuck into a meal worm pasta?

A new food perspective and online resource that encouraging you to learn about and explore insects as a new and exciting food source is part of a hugely exciting and jaw dropping exhibition at the National Craft Gallery opposite Kilkenny Castle in the Castle Courtyard.

The Global Irish Design Challenge exhibition launched on Friday features over 50 Irish design projects, each piece created with the potential to revolutionise the way we live.

One stands out, éntomo. The stand highlights its online resource which provides you with information about entomophagy, tasty tips for cooking with insects, events and insights from around the world with tyhe intention of creating a novel lifestyle that is sustainable and nutritious.

Connect with éntomo

Entomophagy is the term used to describe eating insects. Eating bugs is not a modern phenomenon, entomophagy has been part of many world cultures for thousands of years and today in Thailand, South America, and China, bugs are considered a great delicacy.

However in Ireland there is a real problem getting people to connect with what many feel is the future of food globally.

Why éntomo?
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A designer has created a bug-eating kit to save humanity

A designer has created a bug-eating kit to save humanity | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Designer Kobayashi Wataru is offering a small solution to the problem of making insects seem palatable for cultures where they aren’t yet widely eaten which his creation BugBug utensils. The range, which isn’t available in shops, includes especially designed chopsticks, a spork for picking up bugs, and a set of claws which slide over the fingers and help when eating bugs like crisps. He won UCL’s Institute of Making 'Cutlery Design Challenge' with his design last year.
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Parkside creates home compostable pack

Parkside creates home compostable pack | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Leading packaging solutions provider, Parkside, is extending its compostable packaging range with a home compostable pack for a newly launched energy bar made from powdered cricket flour.

Pete Ford, new business development manager at Parkside, said: “We have worked hard with our client to produce a natural, sustainable pack, with the packaging and contents being produced from plant based materials. Next Step Foods Ltd. wanted to ensure that the natural benefits of its Yumpa product were fully reflected in the packaging used to wrap it.

“Working with Parkside, Next Step Foods have been delighted that it’s been able to get a sustainable printed package that supports the pack, brand and company’s ethos.”

Next Step Foods is a forward-thinking snack food company, developing and producing sustainable, healthy and tasty snacks. Each Yumpa bar contains 32 powdered crickets, plus nuts, seeds and dried fruit, and is free from gluten, diary, soya and sulphites and has no added sugar or additives.

Parkside is the first flexible packaging company in the UK to successfully produce a range of barrier laminates that have completed the rigorous disintegration and eco-toxicity testing for home composting with recognised European laboratory, OWS. The duplex laminated structure has attained full accreditation under Vincotte’s OK Compost Home and Seedling certification after achieving a high degree of compostability.
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Insect fatty acids: A comparison of lipids from three Orthopterans and Tenebrio molitor L. larvae

Insect fatty acids: A comparison of lipids from three Orthopterans and Tenebrio molitor L. larvae | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract
In order to explore some potential insect sources of food lipids, the lipid compositions of three Orthopterans (Acheta domesticus, Conocephalus discolor and Chorthippus parallelus) were analyzed and compared with those of Tenebrio molitor larvae. A. domesticus, Co. discolor, Ch. parallelus and T. molitor larvae were found to contain approximately 15%, 13%, 10% and 32% lipids on dry weight, respectively. The lipids from three Orthopterans contain much higher amounts of essential fatty acids than those of T. molitor larvae. The two Orthopterans of the suborder Ensifera i.e., A. domesticus and Co. discolor contain linoleic acid in major quantities, while Ch. parallelus of the suborder Caelifera, contain α-linolenic acid in major quantities. The consumption of linoleic and α-linolenic fatty acid is linked with numerous health promoting effects. The factors that contribute to differences in fatty acid profiles of these insects are being discussed. At last the nutritional parameters including polyunsaturated to saturated and omega 6 to omega 3 fatty acid ratios of these insect lipids are also being discussed to understand the potential role of these lipids in human nutrition.
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By 2050, we'll all be eating bugs — on purpose

Well, that's if you consider the activities of actor Nicolas Cage an indicator of what's trending. On Sunday, Cage celebrated his 53rd birthday (albeit, a little belatedly) with a cake topped with the crunchy bugs. 

Farming and eating bugs — an American food overhaul — is the key to a brighter, more sustainable future, filmmakers Johanna B. Kelly and Cameron Marshad told Mic. In The Gateway Bug, which premieres Thursday at the 32nd Santa Barbara International Film Festival, the pair documents how making a simple dietary change like swapping a beef burger for cricket-based version could benefit the health of an individual, the environment and the future. 
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Grow Your Own Edible Mealworms in Your Kitchen

Published on Jan 11, 2017
Jan.11 -- The idea of eating insects might not be to everyone's taste, but people in Asia have been dining on bugs for centuries. To satisfy insect eaters' appetite, Livin Farms founder Katharina Unger and her team invented the world's first desktop edible insect farm.
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This restaurant in Tokyo is selling Valentine's Day cocktails with edible insects

This restaurant in Tokyo is selling Valentine's Day cocktails with edible insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Valentine's Day can make any non-romantic want to gag.

Between chocolates, candy and overdone greeting cards, the over-romantic sentiments of the holiday can get to be a bit much.
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Tokyo bar adds fear factor to Valentine's Day by putting edible insects on the menu | The Japan Times

Tokyo bar adds fear factor to Valentine's Day by putting edible insects on the menu | The Japan Times | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Tired of the usual box of chocolates? Try a bug cocktail or a caramel creepy crawly for Valentine’s Day.

A Tokyo bar on Sunday offered courageous couples and curious gourmets a special menu of desserts and drinks made with insects ahead of Tuesday’s holiday.

“They are crispy like the skin of walnuts and go pretty well with chocolate,” said Sayumi Makino, 20, at the Duranbar in central Tokyo.

The special menu ranged from a cranberry and water bug cocktail to caramelized worms with almonds and cashews. The whipped cream on some desserts included the internal fluids of giant Thai water bugs, known for their sweet taste.

While insects can be found in some regional cuisines, bugs are not a common menu item across Japan.

Yuta Shinohara, a university student who organized the bug cocktail night, said he wanted to promote an alternative food culture.
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Lincoln start-up makes foods made out of bugs

Lincoln start-up makes foods made out of bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Its plan to help feed the world is getting traction and finding a market, so are you ready to be a bug-eater?

They make macaroni from mealworms, rice from crickets and a protein drink called "Jump."

From the university that brought us "The Bugeaters" more than a century ago comes Bugeater Foods.

"Basically, we want to be the ConAgra of bugs," said Bugeater Foods CEO, Kelly Sturek.

Sturek left the University of Nebraska Lincoln to pursue a bug's life.

"I had a good opportunity, pretty much it was spend money to get my degree or get money to start this business. I took the money," he said.
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