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Safe, Sane and Consensual - Insects are the future of food - The Daily Californian

Safe, Sane and Consensual - Insects are the future of food - The Daily Californian | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
I stared into its black, beady, little eyes. Then I popped it in my mouth, expecting the worst, but it was crunchy and tasted like garlic, lime and chili. I was in a market in Oaxaca, Mexico, and mounds of fried grasshoppers, called chapulines, are a common sight. They’re addictive Read More…
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Europe Agrees to Allow Insects as Food - #4ento

Europe Agrees to Allow Insects as Food - #4ento | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Europe has finally reached an agreement on the new Novel Food laws and how it affects insects as food. Find out the details.
Ana C. Day's insight:
Switzerland Plans To Allow Insects As Food

In February 2015, Switzerland was planning to approve some of the same insects as Belgium has been allowing.

Here are some interesting excerpts from this Swissinfo article:

“According to Evelyn Kirchsteiger-Meier, head of the department of quality management and food law at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences, the food safety office is looking, among other things, at a risk analysis by the Belgian authorities. “

“The food safety office notes in its explanation on the new regulation that insects must be frozen and heated before delivery because they are potential carriers of parasites and disease-causing microbes.”

“In addition, they must be recognizable as insects, so not processed. “This is to protect consumers from fraud, because the consumer expectations in our culture are that insects are viewed as pests.””

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Bugs. It's what's for dinner

Bugs. It's what's for dinner | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Piper Patten, 6, isn't quite sure she likes the taste of the chocolate-covered crickets she just popped into her mouth.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The gains are tremendous. According to bugsfordinner.com, "crickets have as much protein as beef, as little fat as salmon and use less than 1 percent of the water needed to produce meat. In fact, edible insects can provide protein with all of the amino acids humans need, they have more calcium than milk, more iron than spinach and are packed with omega 3s and B12. They are also a prebiotic. In fact, everything about them looks great on paper."

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What can trump disgust? Cash? Or the fear of missing out?

What can trump disgust? Cash? Or the fear of missing out? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In most western countries, eating insects still provokes disgust and horror. As the interest in entomophagy grows, a lot of stakeholders will be looking for that magic persuasive factor. What does it take to get people to eat an insect?
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Perhaps then it’s unrealistic to single out one factor in isolation, but it’s definitely worth bearing in mind just how strong our powers of persuasion are. If disgust towards insects is a learned reaction, could it be a question of ‘mind over matter’ to shift that disgust into curiosity and perhaps even enthusiasm?

What could persuade you to take the plunge?"

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Korea's insect industry grows sharply over 4 years

Korea's insect industry grows sharply over 4 years | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
(Yonhap)The South Korean market for insects has grown drastically over the past four years, indicating it could emerge as a promising future industry, a state think tank said Friday.In a report, the Korea Rural Economic Institute estimated the size of the market at 313.9 billion won ($268 million) last year, up 90 percent from 168 billion won in 2011.Last year insects were most used at local governments' events, valu...
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Meet Max Ries, Who Brought Edible Insects to 1940s Chicago | Jewniverse

Meet Max Ries, Who Brought Edible Insects to 1940s Chicago | Jewniverse | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
There’s been a surge of interest in entomophagy, the human consumption of insects. Eighty percent of the world’s population already does it. Even in Israel, a recent locust swarm got foodies salivating, even though it’s unclear whether–or more precisely, which–locusts are kosher.

Americans have been eating insects for decades, and one of its chief proponents was a German-Jewish textile manufacturer. Max Ries set up a cheese import business out of the back of his station wagon in Chicago in the early 1940s. Ries indulged the American fascination with exotic foods by selling tinned tiger and elephant meat obtained from zoos, as well as kangaroo and reindeer steaks. Ries had a flair for the theatrical; he “was slim and dashing; he wore handmade suits and twirled his cigars.”
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Ghana: Palm tree Weevil larvae to address low Blood-Iron Levels

Ghana: Palm tree Weevil larvae to address low Blood-Iron Levels | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Aspire Food Group operates Ghana’s first commercial insect farm. It wants to bring insects from the culinary margins to the mainstream to address food shortages, as well as to boost people’s iron i…

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To Eat Or Not To Eat Insects…

To Eat Or Not To Eat Insects… | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Entomophagy, the act of humans consuming insects. Although the norm for many cultures (around 80% of the world's population) across South America, Asia and Africa, most Brits' exposure and knowledge of eating creepy crawlies starts and finishes with having watched celebs eat them as a challenge on I'm a Celebrity Get Me Out Of Here. And for them, the idea of it isn't an appealing one.

However, with the detrimental environmental effects (air and water pollution, deforestation and overfishing) of farming such vast quantities of livestock 'needed' to fulfil the growing demands for meat and fish, then eating insects might be the answer. It is a cost-effective and eco-friendly process and they're packed with protein, minerals, vitamins, fibre and healthy fats.
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Would you consume 'cricket flour' after a workout?

Would you consume 'cricket flour' after a workout? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Smash Nutrition, based in Hanwell, Ealing, has launched a unique Cricket Protein Formula to counter the rising number of athletes suffering from intolerance to whey
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Smash Nutrition's Cricket Protein Formula is designed to be taken directly after a workout and is quickly digested for prolonged recovery and to restore glycogen levels more efficiently.

The formula doesn't consist purely of cricket, but uses a range of natural protein sources as well as providing all the required amino acids and natural protease enzymes.

It uses Acheta Domestica crickets which are commercially raised in controlled, hygienic conditions before being transformed into high quality cricket flour protein."

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Selected species of edible insects as a source of nutrient composition

Selected species of edible insects as a source of nutrient composition | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Official Full-Text Publication: Selected species of edible insects as a source of nutrient composition on ResearchGate, the professional network for scientists.
Ana C. Day's insight:

ABSTRACT

"The aim of this study was to determine the nutritive value of edible insects and their in vitro cytotoxicity assays. The content of protein, fat, carbohydrates, ash, fiber, minerals, amino acids, and fatty acids in adult cricket (Gryllodes sigillatus), larvae of mealworm (Tenebrio molitor), and adult locust (Schistocerca gregaria) were analyzed. The protein content ranged from 52.35 to 76%. The fat percentage was in the range of 12.97–24.7%. Energy contribution varied from 1821 to 1896 kJ/100 g. Their amino acid profile was compared with the WHO/FAO/UNU Pattern (WHO, 2007). The highest degree of hydrolysis (DH) was noted in baked Gryllodes sigillatus (37.76%). All species were very rich in magnesium, copper, iron, and zinc and the mineral content was compared to recommended daily intakes (mg/day). The hydrolysates from raw, cooked, and baked insects were significantly stimulated or inhibited proliferation of human skin fibroblasts CRL-2522.


Selected species of edible insects as a source of nutrient composition (PDF Download Available). Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282860539_Selected_species_of_edible_insects_as_a_source_of_nutrient_composition [accessed Feb 5, 2016]."

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Practical key to identify entire edible insects sold as foodstuff or feedstuff in central Europe - Open Access - Vetline

Practical key to identify entire edible insects sold as foodstuff or feedstuff in central Europe - Open Access - Vetline | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In 2014, edible insects have been introduced officially into the European Union market in Belgium and the Netherlands as foodstuffs, presenting national regulations in order to nsure food safety. Entomophagy is also practiced, on a small scale, in other EU countries, e. g. Germany. Consumers and public health staff are interested in knowing more about this foodstuff, and identification of edible insects is one of the information fields that have to be attended..
Ana C. Day's insight:

..........Insects are usually identified using scientific keys, but the specialized nomenclature to describe exterior features makes this a job for experts. The present key is intended to be used also by non-experts, addressing 18 insects species that are either part of the official Belgian and/or Dutch list for insects that are tradable as foodstuffs or are available in German pet shops from where consumers may buy them, rededicating a feedstuff knowingly and at their own risk to a foodstuff. As a preliminary evaluation, the key was offered students of veterinary medicine. They were asked to identify some insect with this key and to rate it with a score from 1 (very easy) to 6 (impossible). Students worked with n = 20 insect specimens rating the key with mean score of 1.85 ± 0.72. The key presented here includes the improvements as suggested by the students."

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Eartheasy Blog » Should We Be Eating Insects?

Eartheasy Blog » Should We Be Eating Insects? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Sometimes solutions to the world’s toughest problems are right under our noses—or that’s what innovators from Europe and North America seem to be discovering in their hunt for global food security. In recent years, impending protein shortages and the lack of sustainable food production models have led more than one innovator to the practice of entomophagy, otherwise known as eating insects. Could they be onto something?
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The potential of a diet full of bugs

The potential of a diet full of bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Most people would cringe at the thought of eating bugs for dinner, but David George Gordon does it...

Ana C. Day's insight:

"An award-winning author, naturalist and speaker, Gordon is a proponent of entomophagy –– “the fancy word for bug eating” as he puts it –– since the release of his Eat-a-Bug Cookbook in 1998, and he has seen the cultural shift that has started to take place in regards to consuming insects. 

A good source of protein, in the face of an ever threatened food system, many have advocated for insects as part of a more sustainable diet. 

Raising cattle is not a very sustainable thing,” said Gordon. 

He said to produce one hamburger, for example, it takes around 460 gallons of water, not to mention the amount of land required to raise cattle. Today livestock production accounts for 70 percent of all agricultural land use. Given that global demand for livestock is estimated to more than double by 2050."

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How to Raise Your Own Crickets

How to Raise Your Own Crickets | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
How to Raise Your Own Crickets. Are you tired of going to the pet store and buying crickets every week to feed your scaly, squirmy, or hairy little friend? If you're a true do-it-yourselfer, then you might be interested in raising your own...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Are you tired of going to the pet store and buying crickets every week to feed your scaly, squirmy, or hairy little friend? If you're a true do-it-yourselfer, then you might be interested in raising your own colony of crickets, which will provide a steady — and free — source of crickets right within the comfort of your home."

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Raise Edible Insects at Home With the Livin Farms Desktop Hive

Raise Edible Insects at Home With the Livin Farms Desktop Hive | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
We talk to company co-founder Katharina Unger about eating bugs for better personal and environmental health.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"When someone receives a Hive starter kit, it comes with what Livin Farms calls “micro livestock”—in this case, mealworms, which have a neutral taste but are high in protein, like other meats. These mealworms are placed in the “pupation compartment” in the Hive’s top drawer, where they are fed vegetable scraps from an individual’s kitchen along with some oats. A button triggers a controlled microclimate, ensuring that the mealworms are given enough fresh air and the right temperature to grow, then activates the harvest."

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INSETTI COMMESTIBILI – l’esperto risponde – EDIBLEINSECTS

INSETTI COMMESTIBILI – l’esperto risponde – EDIBLEINSECTS | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
nauguriamo questa rubrica con un’intervista ad Andrea Mascaretti, Presidente del Salone Internazionale della Ricerca e Sicurezza  Alimentare e promotore del progetto italiano “Edible Insects” che ha realizzato la mostra sui prodotti alimentari a base di insetti commestibili nel FFD (Future Food District Expo 2015) e ha organizzato la prima, e fin’ora unica, degustazione d’insetti commestibili autorizzata in Italia (in Expo 2015).
Ana C. Day's insight:

"La ringrazio Presidente Mascaretti, e la saluto con un’ultima domanda: in futuro, sarà possibile considerare anche in Italia gli insetti come alimento e acquistarli nei supermercati?

E’ solo questione di tempo. L’EFSA, l’Agenzia europea per la sicurezza alimentare che ha sede a Parma, ha già pubblicato, sotto forma di profilo di rischio, un proprio parere sugli insetti commestibili. Il Parlamento europeo sta approvando un nuovo regolamento per il “novel food”. Insomma, la macchina europea si è messa inesorabilmente in moto e presto avremo delle regole che ci consentiranno l’utilizzo di insetti come alimento in Italia, così come nel resto d’Europa."

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Insectos consumidos actualmente: Los Saltamontes

Insectos consumidos actualmente: Los Saltamontes | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Los saltamontes comestibles (Ruspolia differens), también conocidos comúnmente como Homorocoryphus nitidulus vicinus, son unos saltamontes de cuernos largos de la familia Tettigoniidae. Es un alimento común en muchas partes del África oriental y meridional. En la región del Lago Victoria, al este de África, donde los saltamontes se conocen como nsenene, juegan un papel muy…
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Wakayama NPO chief using locusts for the perfect seasoning | The Japan Times

Wakayama NPO chief using locusts for the perfect seasoning | The Japan Times | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
KINOKAWA, WAKAYAMA PREF. – In an effort to revitalize rural areas, nonprofit organization leader Hiroto Tanaka has developed a soy sauce-like seasoning using traditional fermentation technologies in western Japan.

However, what makes his product unconventional is its basic ingredient — Japanese inago (locusts).

The salty sauce “harmonizes well with bonito and mushroom stock,” Tanaka says, adding that the product is suitable for traditional washoku (Japanese cuisine) dishes.
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This food entrepreneur will convince you to eat insects

This food entrepreneur will convince you to eat insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
At Esca Bona, Aspire Foods' founder explains how to help consumers overcome the psychological barriers that prevent them from eating sustainable insect protein.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Austin-based Mohammed Ashour is on a mission to help consumers get over the “ick” factor of eating insects, and to embrace bugs as a sustainable source of protein. How? By founding Aspire Foods, an ingredient supply company that mills insects into fine powders that are easily incorporated into bars, snacks and more.

At Esca Bona, Ashour explained why bugs should be a big part of the good-food future, and why this emerging food trend really has legs."

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S. Korea's insect industry grows sharply over 4 years

S. Korea's insect industry grows sharply over 4 years | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
SEOUL, Feb. 5 (Yonhap) -- The South Korean market for insects has grown drastically over the past four years, indicating it could emerge as a promising future industry, a state think tank said Friday.

In a report, the Korea Rural Economic Institute (KREI) estimated the size of the market at 313.9 billion won (US$268 million) last year, up 90 percent from 168 billion won in 2011.

Last year insects were most used at local governments' events, valued at 181.6 billion won. Events using insects included a butterfly festival in Hampyong, South Jeolla Province; a firefly festival in Muju, North Jeolla Province; and an insect bioexpo in Yecheon, North Gyeongsang Province.

The market for pet insects like rhinoceros beetles and stag beetles was estimated at between 37.2 billion won and 49.6 billion won, respectively, while that for pollen-carrying insects was 43.2 billion won.

Trading of edible insects and insects for animal feed was valued at 6 billion won each. About 5 billion won worth of insects were sold to be used as natural enemies against harmful insects, while 4.9 billion won worth of insects were sold for studying purposes and 2 to 3 billion won worth of bugs were traded to be used as medicine.
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Innovative formulation -Science meets nature !

Innovative formulation -Science meets nature ! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Science meets nature

Our innovative formulation draws its inspiration from 20 years of research and food product development. Detailed biochemistry and exhaustive food science trials have done the hard work of nutritional science for you.

Respect your body. Try Smash Nutrition high protein recovery powder and start smashing your goals today.

Our formulation contains natural sources of
proteases (which help digest proteins) from fruit, and all the essential amino acids. Get to grips with our myriad of wonder ingredients below.
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Unspoken Words: Interview with Laura D'Asaro co-founder of Six Foods

Published on Feb 4, 2016
Today on Unspoken Words, Robert Dunn chats with Laura D'Asaro! Laura D’Asaro and Rose Wang, who founded Six Foods, plan to get around the yuck factor with insect-based foods that don’t look like the creepy-crawlies they come from. Their cricket flour is about 70 per cent protein by weight – the idea is to blend it into recipes for chips and cookies alongside the other typical ingredients. The foods come out looking and tasting like things people are already used to eating, only with a boost in nutritional value.
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Insectos consumidos actualmente: Los Chinches

Insectos consumidos actualmente: Los Chinches | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
En México (Ramos Elorduy y Pino, 2003), el sur de África y el sudeste Asia, no es raro encontrar personas que consuman chinches (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), tanto ninfas, como adultos (DeFoliart, 2002). En el África meridional, Encosternum delegorguei se consideran un manajar. Los chinches se consumen en Malawi, Sudáfrica y Zimbabwe (Faure, 1944; Van Huis, 2003;…
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The Future of Protein | The Field Guides

The Future of Protein | The Field Guides | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Writer Allison Fogarty unpacks our appetite for meat and asks whether Australians are ready to embrace edible insects as a new source of protein
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Australia is a meat-obsessed nation. Ranked in the top 3 biggest meat eating countries in the world, the average Australian will consume 111.5 kilograms of meat every year. It’s part of our cultural identity to char sausages on a BBQ, but the carnivorous golden age is coming to an end. Researchers are now predicting that traditional livestock production won’t be sufficient to meet demand by 2050. As the global population swells to 9 billion, there simply won’t be enough land and water to produce such huge volumes of meat. Whether we like it or not, altering our appetite for the flesh is inevitable.

One solution to this emerging problem is to embrace alternative sources of protein, and entomophagy (insect eating) is leading the pack. Farmed insects have an astonishingly low ecological footprint because they use just a fraction of the water, land and feed required to...."

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Chirpy Breakfast Bagel with Cherry Almond Butter

Chirpy Breakfast Bagel with Cherry Almond Butter | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
It's been a while since my last post; I've been pretty busy with musical side projects, but apparently not so busy that I couldn't post a quick brunch recipe. At any rate....a couple of weeks ago, I tried something new with some circular bread dipping dishes that my best friend's parents gave me.  Let me tell you, these…
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Insectos consumidos en la actualidad: La Termita

Insectos consumidos en la actualidad: La Termita | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
En el mundo occidental, generalmente las termitas son sinónimo de plagas y son conocidas por su capacidad para devorar la madera. Sin embargo, las termitas se consideran un manjar en muchas partes del mundo. Se consumen en muchos tipos de platos, o simplemente como aperitivo después de haber sido fritas y secadas al sol (Kinyuru,…
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Las termitas son ricas en proteínas, ácidos grasos y otros micronutrientes. Cuando se preparan fritas o desecadas pueden contener entre un 32 % y un 38% de proteínas (Tihon, 1946; Santos Oliveira et al, 1976;. Nkouka, 1987). La concentración de ácidos grasos esenciales como el ácido linoleico es particularmente alta entre las especies de termitas Africanas, Macrotermes bellicosus (34 %) y M. Subhyalinus (43 %) (Santos Oliveira et al., 1976). En la República Bolivariana de Venezuela, las especies ...."

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Looking Ahead: Food Trends of 2016

Looking Ahead: Food Trends of 2016 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Edible Insects
The Scoop: Lauded for providing more health and environmental benefits than meat and fish, insects offer a sustainable and stable source of nutrients. There’s a wide range available; there are almost a million species of insects, although not all are edible. They’re not so taboo abroad so while there are plenty of new products out there to try (cricket is big, think Exo or Bitty), this trend will gain staying power if people get educated and perceptions shift.

Find It: When you're ready, look around EntoMarket. It's an online marketplace for a wide variety of edible insect products. First, you might want to browse Little Herds, a non-profit educating and changing people's perception about eating bugs, or Girl Meets Bug, a blog with the same purpose.
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