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Hopper Foods Launches Kickstarter Campaign for Revolutionary Energy Bar Made with Cricket Flour, Hopper Bars part of Austin’s Growing Edible Insect Industry | Virtual-Strategy Magazine

Hopper Foods Launches Kickstarter Campaign for Revolutionary Energy Bar Made with Cricket Flour, Hopper Bars part of Austin’s Growing Edible Insect Industry | Virtual-Strategy Magazine | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Hopper Foods LLC, which specializes in energy snacks made from nutritious insects, is launching a new Kickstarter campaign on July 23, 2014, for its latest range of health bars. Cricket flour is a sustainable source of complete, high quality protein with very low water and feed requirements. It is the future of food. | Virtual Strategy Magazine is an online publication devoted entirely to virtualization technologies.
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Current State of Legislation For Insects As Food - 4ento

Current State of Legislation For Insects As Food - 4ento | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Is selling Insects as Food legal? Find out what the current state of legislation is for edible insects and what the future holds for this rising trend.
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From Paleo to Cricket Protein: 5 Natural Lifestyle Trends to Watch - Mommy Greenest

From Paleo to Cricket Protein: 5 Natural Lifestyle Trends to Watch - Mommy Greenest | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Want to know what’s the next quinoa or kale...crickets? Keep an eye on these five natural lifestyle trends!
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Eco-friendly innovation will shape the future of the food industry

Eco-friendly innovation will shape the future of the food industry | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

The study What's Cooking in Tomorrow's Kitchen stated that in the face of a growing global population and limited natural resources, alternative and environmental friendly ingredients such as macro-algae (seaweed), micro-algae (spirolina and chlorella) and insects as a form of protein, may “drastically change the market”.

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Breaking the taste taboo

Breaking the taste taboo | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

The next taste taboo

With the raw fish and cheese hurdles overcome, what is next in modifying consumer taste preferences?

Eating insects is being increasingly touted as a sustainable solution to the protein demands of a growing world population.

While marketers face a seemingly momentous task in overcoming the disgust factor – a 2014 study into commercialising insects in the West was entitled ‘How to market the impossible’ – there are ways of making insects appear more palatable.

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New food innovation conference launched

New food innovation conference launched | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Tactical insight into the food and drink industry of tomorrow is the aim of a new one-day conference exploring how businesses can harness innovation to benefit their bottom line.
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5 edible Latin American bugs

5 edible Latin American bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
With the UN promoting insects as a new sustainable food, GlobalPost looks at five Latin American creepy-crawlies that locals just love to eat.
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The restaurant where a fly in the soup is a GOOD thing

The restaurant where a fly in the soup is a GOOD thing | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Grub Kitchen in Haverfordwest, South Wales, will be the UK's first restaurant to focus entirely on insect produce. Bugs of all types including grasshoppers and worms will be served.
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Insect Futures Could Be The Next Big Thing

Insect Futures Could Be The Next Big Thing | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Investors are frantically seeking an edge in the markets…

And with markets like gold and crude oil so crowded, it’s time to start thinking outside the box.

Well, there is a new commodity that’s poised to invade all parts of the market, from agriculture to medicine.

Some people might find it disturbing, but there’s already demand. Over one quarter of the world is consuming this new commodity, and more are catching on every day!

This Idea “Has Legs”
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Insect-based dishes on menu at St George's Market - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk

Insect-based dishes on menu at St George's Market - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
It might not be the most appealing snack for a weekend stroll round St George's Market - but we could all be indulging in these invertebrate treats in the future.
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What is Entomophagy? - 4ento

What is Entomophagy? - 4ento | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
With the world in search of alternative food sources, the word Entomophagy is starting to appear all over the web. So what is Entomophagy? Well, according to wikipedia Entomophagy is the human consumption of insects as food And in fact the word is derived from the Greek words for insects and to eat. However, is it as simple as that? A Broad Definition The broader definition ofEntomophagy actually includes arthropods that are not insects such as some arachnids (spiders) and also myriapods (centip
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U.S. cricket farming scales up

U.S. cricket farming scales up | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Tiny Farms co-founder Daniel Imrie-Situnayake is helping to lay the technology groundwork for industrial-scale insect production in the United States. Daniel Imrie-Situnayake Two billion people wor...
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Edible insects: grub pioneers aim to make bugs palatable - FT.com

Edible insects: grub pioneers aim to make bugs palatable - FT.com | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. 

Appealing to the senses is important when introducing novel foods, says chef Andy Holcroft. He is planning the opening of Grub, a restaurant serving delicacies such as Moroccan-spiced insect kebabs, at a bug visitor attraction in Wales. “Crispy and crunchy descriptions of insects, such as stir-fried or sautéed, sound more appetising than soft-boiled or poached . . . [which sound] squelchy and squishy,” he says. His venture follows a move by Wahaca, a high-street Mexican restaurant chain, to put crickets on its specials menu.

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Insect diet offers squirming sustainability

Insect diet offers squirming sustainability | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
From juicing to gluten-free labels, the health world has played host to its fair share of hype in recent years. However, one Auburn University senior is pioneering a new health-based challenge: Camren Brantley-Rios is eating bugs three times a day for 30 days in hopes that more members of the Western world will incorporate insects into their diets. 
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Could Squirmy Livestock Dent Africa’s Protein Deficit?

Could Squirmy Livestock Dent Africa’s Protein Deficit? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Newswise — MADISON, Wis. — As a cheap and easy source of protein for humans, it might be hard to beat the mighty mealworm.
Consider:
—The capacity of insects like mealworms to convert feed to body mass exceeds that of traditional livestock such as beef by orders of magnitude.
—Mealworms are 100 percent edible, whereas only about 40 percent of a cow or 55 percent of a chicken can be consumed.
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20 minutes - Berne favorable à la vente de grillons comestibles - Suisse

20 minutes - Berne favorable à la vente de grillons comestibles - Suisse | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Le Conseil fédéral envisage d'autoriser notamment des grillons et des sauterelles en tant que denrées alimentaires. Les amateurs de ces petites bestioles jubilent.
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Cochineal insects are a source of red dye

Cochineal insects are a source of red dye | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Cochineal insects, Dactylopius coccus, are scale insects in the family Coccidae. They are soft-bodied, flat and oval-shaped. The females attach themselves to prickly pear cactus and feed on the plant juices. The nymphs appear white or gray from the waxy white protective substance they produce. The bodies are actually a dark purple from the carmine pigment they produce. Individual cochineal insects are dispersed to new plants at the nymph stage as the wind catches the long waxy strings on the nym
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Insect Food Products Currently Available - 4ento

Insect Food Products Currently Available - 4ento | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Find out what insect food products are available, who is producing them, what is inside them and and how you can buy them. Insects are the future of food.
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Edible Insects - Regulatory Update - North America

Edible Insects - Regulatory Update - North America | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Regulatory Update
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Federal, state and local regulations

State and local regulations vary by state. As you are using insects as food, follow all of the regulations that govern food production. An overview can be found on the FDA website.

USDA or FDA

On a Federal level, insects used as food fall under FDA oversight. The USDA’s Food and Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) regulates meat, poultry and eggs. Everything else defaults to FDA regulation. FDA regulates sea food (which is most similar to insects …think shrimp and soft shell crab) and even covers game such as venison.
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About 30 Days of Bugs

About 30 Days of Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Why would anyone eat bugs? Find out why entomophagy is a sustainable food practice.
The first thing you should know is that bugs are healthy.In fact, insects are so nutritious that the United Nations is encouraging people around the world to eat more of them. Yes, I said more of them. Approximately 2 billion people are already eating insects. It’s called entomophagy and it is a fancy word for bug consumption. Surprisingly, insects are one the healthiest foods you can eat. Critters like crickets, mealworms and waxworms are jam-packed with protein, fiber and healthy fats. They are creepy- crawly superfoods.
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Detroit 2016

Detroit 2016 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

It's official!  On May 26-28, 2016, Detroit will be hosting a three-day, international, interdisciplinary conference on the topic of insects as food and feed.

Ana C. Day's insight:

What can you expect?  
Each day we will have a range of talks from experts from anthropology, entomology, food science and nutrition, businesses and nonprofits, and many more.  As pioneers in this movement, we are each responsible to portray the benefits, realities, struggles, and potential of insects as food the best we can to our peers.  It is the goal of the conference to provide everyone, no matter their expertise or novice, with something new for going forward.

Will you get to try some insects?
Absolutely!  The majority of the day will be dedicated to talking and thinking about insects as food, but the evenings will be devoted to eating!  Watch the events page for more details.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to reach out using the contact page.

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Ant gin, cricket soup: Bugs crawl onto menu at Cordon Bleu

Ant gin, cricket soup: Bugs crawl onto menu at Cordon Bleu | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
BANGKOK (AP) — Bugs in a gourmet kitchen are usually something to be squashed or swatted. But at Le Cordon Bleu, the esteemed French cooking school, chefs and food scientists spent a week simmering, sauteing and grilling…
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Could YOU eat mealworms, crickets and cockroaches every day for a month?

Could YOU eat mealworms, crickets and cockroaches every day for a month? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects are a sensible and ecologically friendly source of protein, and yet 'entomophagy' revolts most Westerners. Here's how one student is trying to change that mentality.
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We Fed Cookies Made Out Of Bugs To Our Coworkers. Here's What Happened.

We Fed Cookies Made Out Of Bugs To Our Coworkers. Here's What Happened. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
You may feel squeamish about chomping down insects with their eyes, legs, and antennae still intact, but would you eat insects if they were disguised in butter and sugar-filled cookies? We baked chocolate chip cookies made from pulverized insects and brought them to our office where our brave coworkers tasted them.
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6 reasons you should consider eating insects

This isn't meant as a provocative, theoretical idea. It's a serious solution to the increasingly pressing problems of global warming and animal welfare — and a practical way of adding low-fat protein to your diet. The UN has advocated eating insects for these very legitimate reasons, and it's something two billion or so people around the world have done for centuries.

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Des insectes plutôt que des OGM pour nourrir les animaux ?

Des insectes plutôt que des OGM pour nourrir les animaux ? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
L'Agence nationale de la recherche envisage de nourrir les élevages de poulets ou de poissons avec des farines d'insectes. Une alternative écologique au soja transgénique importé du Brésil, d'Argentine ou des États-Unis. Avec 4,6 millions de tonnes par an, la France est aujourd’hui le plus gros...
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Christian Allié's curator insight, February 17, 8:50 AM

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SOURCE D’ALIMENTATION HUMAINE INDIRECTES’ils sont déjà consommés directement par près de deux milliards d’êtres humains et malgré leurs vertus nutritives, ces insectes suscitent peu l’appétit des Français. Ils pourraient cependant rentrer dans nos assiettes de façon indirecte en nourrissant nos élevages. Candidats idéals : les poissons et les volailles, qui sont des prédateurs naturels des insectes.
 
Le seul problème provient de l’absence d’une filière industrielle en France, comme il en existe déjà pour le ver à soie. C’est pour pallier ce manque que l’ANR a investi près d’un million d’euros dans le bien-nommé projet « Désirable  », en partenariat avec deux PME et cinq centres de recherche (AgroParisTech, l’INRA, le CEA, le CNRS, et l’IRSTEA).

Leur but ? Construire une usine à insectes expérimentale (une "entoraffinerie") pour concevoir des procédés industriels et des normes de qualité. Deux candidats ont été retenus : le ver de farine Tenebrio Molitor et la mouche soldat Hermetia illucens. Le premier est capable de transformer des céréales en protéines animales, tandis que la seconde peut recycler des déchets carnés et du lisier. Des options, certes, peu ragoûtantes, mais particulièrement efficientes sur le plan écologique.
Réactions futures des consommateursMais de nombreuses questions restent encore en suspens, auxquelles entend répondre l'approche pluridisciplinaire et la coopération des scientifiques. Il faut d'abord définir précisément les modes d'alimentation des insectes, calculer leur apport nutritif, l’appétence des animaux pour ces farines, ou encore les réactions futures des consommateurs... Sabrina Teyssier, économiste à l’Inra, s'interroge : « Nous anticipons l’arrivée sur le marché de ces poissons et poulets nourris aux farines d’insectes : combien les consommateurs occidentaux seront-ils prêts à payer et quels sont les mécanismes d’incitation pour changer les comportements ? ».
 
Et c'est peut-être là le plus grand défi, même si des produits dérivés d'insectes sont utilisés depuis bien longtemps dans notre alimentation, à l'instar du rouge de cochenille qui colore nos bonbons. Selon la FAO, le développement de la production de protéines par des insectes est une priorité pour nourrir les 9 milliards d'être humains attendus en 2050.
Jean-Jacques Valette
Journaliste We Demain
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Technology is now tackling the world hunger crisis

Technology is now tackling the world hunger crisis | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

No one is smiling
The next solution may not go down your palate easily: Bugs. Several experiments are currently being conducted about their feasibility as food and some of them are paying off handsomely. Cricket flour has been developed and its been found to be easy to produce, has some of the highest sources of protein and, in blind tastings (where subjects didn’t know what they were eating) has been found to be exceptionally tasty. 

Other insects are also being sliced, diced and tech infused to turn into food options. And, as we all have experienced, insects are one resource that we aren’t going to run out of in the near future. All you need to do is spend one day outdoors in summer to see all your future food buzzing around you.

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