Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
178.5K views | +12 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Ana C. Day
onto Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Scoop.it!

5 Reasons Eating Bugs Could Save The World, According To Seattle's Own 'Bug Chef'

5 Reasons Eating Bugs Could Save The World, According To Seattle's Own 'Bug Chef' | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Seattle author David George Gordon would be more than happy to share his recipe for his three bee salad or cricket nymph risotto. Try the deep-fried
more...
No comment yet.
Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

#BugsEndHunger - Eat bugs, fight for #foodsecurity. Share, donate, eat & empower! @LittleHerds #SeedsOfAction

#BugsEndHunger - Eat bugs, fight for #foodsecurity. Share, donate, eat & empower! @LittleHerds #SeedsOfAction | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
What happens when you eat bugs for 30 days? We believe it will help fuel a movement to end global malnutrition. Little Herds is proud to partner with Seeds Of Action for the #BugsEndHunger campaign. On May 1st, Seeds Of Action co-founder Jeremy Connor will begin his 30 day diet of eating bugs and plant based foods that can be found, or brought in through food aid programs, in areas where the 1 billion chronically hungry are struggling to live. This campaign will bring awareness to edible insects as a sustainable solution to food insecurity and produce a freely distributed, visually based, Farming Insects Guide (FIG) to empower communities across the planet to begin farming insects for food and economic security.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Nutritional composition of five commercial edible insects in South Korea

Highlights

All tested insects possess high protein (44.2–58.3%) with good amino acid profiles.

Beetle larvae tend to contain high level of MUFA oil whereas crickets do PUFA.

Insects could be good source for minerals especially calcium, iron and zinc.

Systematic farming of these insects could be a sustainable alternative to vertebrate animal food.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

"Making the unwanted (insects) desirable"

"Making the unwanted (insects) desirable" | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
WHO IS THIS COURSE FOR?

Food industry companies and individuals who want to explore and understand the opportunity of edible insects, and learn how to sell new sustainable foods and ingredients with insects as a case example.
Entrepreneurs and start-up companies who want to learn new approaches to overcome the current challenges to build successful insects businesses - while also learning new tools & techniques to effectively sell insects in food.
Research companies involved in developing the industry for edible insects
Anyone interested in edible insects as a solution to global health, sustainability and food production issues!
WHAT CAN YOU EXPECT FROM THE COURSE?

We believe in empowering others on their journey to create Better Business. That's why this course is not just educational, but includes hands-on activities to help you develop new skills and tools. From this course, you can expect to -


Validate the vast potential and business opportunity of edible insects
Gain new insights on the wider opportunity of insects, beyond only protein
Gain a deep understanding and insights into the current insects market
Understand the barriers insects face, and what's needed to overcome them to grow the insects industry
Get tools and outputs to help convince others of the opportunity potential of insects
Learn new tools and approaches to effectively sell new, sustainable foods and ingredients
Develop a new mindset and ways of thinking to create better business
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Are insects the new sushi? | pebble magazine

Are insects the new sushi? | pebble magazine | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
“We explore and expand the edible,” On Eating Insects: Stories, Essays and Recipes (by Josh Evans, Roberto Flore, Michael Bom Frøst and Nordic Food Lab, Phaidon), is the result of six years worth of work by the Nordic Food Lab who have taken up the mantle of investigating why the western world doesn’t eat insects. Essays, stories and recipes make up the substantial work, presented with stunning photography. It’s half field guide, half cookery book and we catch up with them to discuss all things creepy and crawly.

The Nordic Food Lab was founded in 2003 by then Noma owners Rene Redzepi and Claus Meyer. It combines their passion for science, gastronomy and agriculture and pulls together experts to examine the big questions facing the food industry whilst recognising that for new ideas and ingredients to be embraced they have to be delicious. Its ethos is distilled into one line in the On Eating Insects introduction,
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Five reasons why you should start eating insects

Five reasons why you should start eating insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
When it comes to our eating habits, the most basic mindset tends to separate what should be eaten from what shouldn't. Particularly, insect fall in the latter category for most people due to basic instincts. However, most people who have regarded the practice of ##Eating Insects taboo are most likely from the Western culture. Statistics show that over 2 billion people spread across numerous cultures partake in plating insects at their dinner tables almost every day of their lives.

As gross as this may seem to some people, there are several reasons why this is a good thing. Here is a #Short List to show you why eating insects maybe in your future.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Edible Bugs - Health & Wellbeing - Omny.fm

Edible Bugs - Health & Wellbeing - Omny.fm | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Clip description

Did you know 80% of the world's population already eats edible insects?! So should we be making it mainsteam in Australia? Food Scientist and Founder of the Edible Bug Shop Skye Blackburn talks about edible bugs. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Edible Innovations: Andrew Brentano Harvests Insects from a "Smart Farm" | Make:

Edible Innovations: Andrew Brentano Harvests Insects from a "Smart Farm" | Make: | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
From Singapore to the USA and all around Europe, Edible Innovations profiles food makers that engage in improving the global food system at every stage, from production to distribution to eating and shopping. Join us as we explore the main trends in the industry from a maker perspective. Chiara Cecchini of Food Innovation Program — an ecosystem with a strong educational core that promotes food innovation as a key tool to tackle the great challenges of the future — introduces you to the faces, stories, and experiences of food makers around the globe. Check back on Tuesdays and Thursdays for new installments.

When most of us think of insects, we think of the creepy crawlies that we are constantly shooing out of our homes and gardens, not a tasty meal. However, if you look just beyond the initial “ew” issue, then the world of edible insects is not only delicious, it’s sustainable.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Eating bugs is the new trend in eating healthy

Eating bugs is the new trend in eating healthy | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Specialized farms in the U.S. raise crickets for human consumption, and as health buffs look for alternative proteins, business has picked up for some startups specializing in bugs.

Chips called "Chirps," made by SixFoods, are marketed as having three times the protein of normal potato chips. They're sold by online retailer Thrive Market at more than 70 airport terminals and just got a deal on the reality show “Shark Tank.”

The creator sent us some cricket flour to try. We made some cookies, which got decent reviews.

Cricket flour is one thing, but are Americans ready to eat straight up bugs? To answer the question, we did what any responsible reporter would do -- ordered up hors d'oeuvres and threw a party in the newsroom.

“We've got chocolate coffee crickets, sour cream and onion, and sriracha crickets,” we offered, along with something called Bugitos. “It's just a toffee coconut Bugito -- you like mojitos, you like Tostitos, you like Doritos. How about a Bugito?”

Reactions from our colleagues varied.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Cricket farming is sustainable but food source must be focus, study notes

Cricket farming is sustainable but food source must be focus, study notes | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Cricket farming can be a sustainable means of producing foods for human consumption, a study suggests, as its environmental impact compares favourably to broiler chicken production.
Those were the conclusions put forward by a Danish team, who whilst heralding edible insect species as a possible solution to the current and future food crises, also identified cricket feed  production methods as an area of concern.

“While crickets consume plant matter in the wild, farmers started to use commercial chicken feeds because they saw that the crickets grew faster,” said Afton Halloran, study co-author and researcher at the Department of Nutrition, at the University of Copenhagen.

“Unfortunately, the production of feed ingredients like maize and soy can have detrimental effects on the environment.”

Consumption of crickets as an alternative protein source here in Europe may be limited by factors such as consumer attitudes and adoption, but feed sources used to cultivate the crickets remains a prime environmental concern.

In the past alternative sources such as different kinds of plants and waste products have been put forward to varying degrees of success.

In contrast, the Far East, and Thailand in particular, cricket farming has been occurring for nearly 20 years with 20,000 farms scattered throughout the north-eastern and northern parts of the country.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Inapub News - Eat insects instead of meat, say scientists

Inapub News - Eat insects instead of meat, say scientists | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Researchers at the University of Edinburgh suggest that by replacing half the world’s meat intake with insects such as crickets, livestock farmland can be cut by a third to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
The study is the first to compare environmental impacts of conventional meat production with those of alternative sources of food. 
Dr Peter Alexander, from the University of Edinburgh’s School of GeoSciences and Scotland’s Rural College, said: “A mix of small changes in consumer behaviour, such as replacing beef with chicken, reducing food waste and potentially introducing insects more commonly into diets, would help achieve land savings and a more sustainable food system.”
While it has no plans to put an ant-burger on the menu just yet, the Pig & Whistle in Earlsfield, South West London says their edible insect snack selection is a nice revenue stream.
The pub sells everything from scorpions to milk chocolate covered crickets. 
Licensee Lee de Villiers said: “We have stocked edible insects for four years sell about 250 bags a year.
“Most customers buy them after a few pints have built up some Dutch courage, but we have a few who like them and come in because we have them.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Edible insects are just one more hard to swallow 'miracle'

I have developed deep scepticism for the daily scientific miracle. Researchers have found a way to ‘cure’ a deadly disease/feed the starving billions/save the planet (delete as applicable) that could be a ‘promising’ solution to an intractable problem.

Universities under pressure to bring in research funds task their press officers with communicating academic work likely to attract grants by serving up narratives that make for easy headlines. Under-interrogated stories get fired out in rapid succession, the latest one frequently contradicting several before. But who cares? These days their audience increasingly has the attention span of a flea.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Crickets over chickens: First study of its kind shows that farming insects for food is sustainable

If you close your eyes, you might just mistake it for a potato chip. Crickets are similar to the deep-fried snack in both texture and taste. Raising the critters for human consumption has been increasing in popularity in Canada. Insects have been declared the “future of food” and Ontario-based Entomo Farms is one of the companies leading the charge.

The first of its kind, a University of Copenhagen study shows that farming crickets for food is more sustainable than other livestock, ScienceDaily reports. The study examined 15 potential problem areas in commercial production, comparing farms raising boiler chickens to those raising crickets in Thailand.

“This research is very timely, as there are many different stakeholders interested in farmed insects. Many people have seen insects as a means of lowering the environmental burden of animal production,” lead author Afton Halloran told ScienceDaily.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Switching Just 50% of Our Meat to Insects Can Seriously Reduce Land Use

Switching Just 50% of Our Meat to Insects Can Seriously Reduce Land Use | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
If we want to cut the environmental impact of livestock, switching to insects and imitation meat products is our best bet, according to a new report.

The inevitability of turning to insects to feed the world's growing population has been looming for a while. And now we finally have some data on how much this shift would actually help the planet.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Readiness to adopt insects in Hungary: A case study

Highlights

First insights into the acceptance of insect-based foods of Hungarian consumers.

Low food technology neophobia values were seen.

Food neophobia is a barrier for the consumption of insects.

Gender has a significant effect; males are more ready to eat insects.

Zero-inflated Poisson regression model showed the best performance.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

The microbiota of marketed processed edible insects as revealed by high-throughput sequencing

Highlights

The microbiota of commercial processed edible insects was explored.

A combination of culture-dependent and -independent methods was applied.

A great bacterial diversity and variation among the insects was found.

Viable pathogens such as Salmonella spp. and L. monocytogenes were not detected.

Human opportunistic pathogens and food spoilage bacteria were seen.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Let's Eat Insects

Let's Eat Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Tags: entomophagyedible insects#bugsendhungerinsect farming#SDG2zero hungernutritionglobal educationfood securitysustainable agriculture

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Nebraska’s Bugeater Foods makes insect-based food products | TheFencePost.com

Nebraska’s Bugeater Foods makes insect-based food products | TheFencePost.com | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Kopf and her fellow company co-founders are current or former UNL students. Kopf is working on her master's in food science and technology, Kelly Sturek was an economics major and Alec Wiese, the third member of the Bugeater team, majored in entrepreneurship. Sturek and Wiese came up with the idea while still in school and reached out to the UNL Food Science Club for help. Kopf responded quickly because she was already working on cricket-based food at the UNL Food Processing Center.

The Bugeater team was set. Kopf is in charge of product development, Sturek handles business and sales and Wiese, who lives in Colorado, does marketing, packaging and website design.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Hey, it’s all protein. You unwittingly eat insects all the time | Palm Beach Post Health Beat

Hey, it’s all protein. You unwittingly eat insects all the time | Palm Beach Post Health Beat | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The Food & Drug Administration allows for certain levels of bugs and other contaminants in food because largely insects generally don’t pose a health a risk.

So what does the FDA allow?

Pasta can contain up to 225 insect fragments. One percent of your chocolate can contain insect parts. That cup of raisins can have up to 33 fruit fly eggs. Spinach can have up to 50 aphids per 100 grams.

And you don’t want to know about a 3.5 ounce can of mushrooms. Too late: one can is allowed to have nine maggots and 74 mites. Maggots aren’t exactly naked to the human eye, FDA.

The FDA has previously confirmed there may be up to an “average of 30 or more insect fragments per 100 grams” of peanut butter and an “average of one or more rodent hairs per 100 grams.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Special Episode No.1 Edible Insects. Interview with Little Herds and Merci Mercado - Pass the Chipotle podcast: Exploring Mexico's delicious cuisine from Pass the Chipotle podcast: Exploring Mexico...

Special Episode No.1 Edible Insects. Interview with Little Herds and Merci Mercado - Pass the Chipotle podcast: Exploring Mexico's delicious cuisine from Pass the Chipotle podcast: Exploring Mexico... | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Presented by: Rocio Carvajal Food historian, cook and author. SPECIAL EPISODE No.1: My guests this week: Virydiana Velarde from Merci Mercado http://mercimercado.com/ and Robert Nathan Allen Founder of the charity Little Herds www.littleherds.org we talk all about how insects are being recognised worldwide as a source of sustainable food and ethical business models. www.passthechipotle.com  […]
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Journée Technique RISPO - Insectes et résidus organiques

Journée Technique RISPO - Insectes et résidus organiques | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
JOURNÉE TECHNIQUE SUR LES RÉSIDUS ORGANIQUES ET LA PRODUCTION D'INSECTES POUR L’ALIMENTATION

Déroulé :
de 9h30 à 10h00 Accueil/Café
de 10h00 à 12h00 Conférences
de 12h00 à 13h30 Repas
de 13H30 à 16h30 Conférences
Détail des conférences à consulter sur l'invitation
Ana C. Day's insight:

JOURNÉE TECHNIQUE SUR LES RÉSIDUS ORGANIQUES ET LA PRODUCTION D'INSECTES POUR L’ALIMENTATION JEUDI 29 JUIN 2017 http://rispo.org/Fichier/JTinsectes20172017-05-05_57.pdf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Edible Insect Seminar & Workshop | InsectCentre

Edible Insect Seminar & Workshop | InsectCentre | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Seminar & workshop content
Basics on insect biology in relation to rearing
Insects and its market potential
Insect production: Current status of production and technology
Legislation, safety and quality
Insect Business creation
The lecturers are from Wageningen University and Research Centre (WUR), HAS University of Applied Sciences and NGN.
The first day, will consist of lectures where state of the art information about the insect production & processing will be shared with you. News fresh from the latest research will be presented.
The second day, is about you and your plans. The content of this day is about networking, collaboration and funding projects. You can present yourself, your business and/or projects you are involved in, or pitch you ideas. If you are up to find partners, you will have networking opportunities and there will be a workshop on the financial aspects of the insect business.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Ethnoculinology — Every Culture has its Dumpling – Lee Cadesky – Medium

Ethnoculinology — Every Culture has its Dumpling – Lee Cadesky – Medium | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Creating foods from bugs straddles a line between the traditional and the futuristic. Insects have been a part of our food history for millennia but they haven’t integrated deeply into most cultures. It’s an exciting prospect because it’s an invitation to create new foods and new culture. A few months ago I got to make my own cricket dumplings. They’re whimsical too.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Study Finds That Going Meatless Could Save the Environment

Study Finds That Going Meatless Could Save the Environment | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
TAKING A BITE OUT OF EMISSIONS

In the first study of its kind, the U.K.’s Global Food Security Programme and the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme have found that swapping beef for insects or chicken could have huge benefits for the environment in two ways. First, by decreasing the amount of greenhouse gasses produced, and second, by freeing up millions of acres of land.

Gidon Eshel at Bard College in New York told the Guardian in 2014 that giving up beef will have a greater impact on the environment than giving up cars. Eating more insects or other imitation meat would also free up 4,150 million acres of land — a distance roughly equivalent to 70 times the size of the U.K.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Study: eating insects instead of beef can help climate change

Study: eating insects instead of beef can help climate change | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
According to a study by the University of Edinburgh and Scotland’s Rural College, eating insects instead of beef could help tackle climate change by reducing emissions linked to livestock production.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

The 'Bug Man' flies on from Purdue

The 'Bug Man' flies on from Purdue | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The next year, Turpin cooked insects for the event as part of an "insects as food" talk and nearly 1,000 people came out. It kept growing every year and eventually joined other campus events until it officially became Spring Fest, an annual event in which departments from across the university showcase the fun, "lighter side" of their work to the public.

“He didn't have full support of Purdue’s administration when we started Bug Bowl and Tom was willing to go ahead even though he was counseled not to do it," Provonsha said. "They wouldn’t even unlock the doors for us in its first years. We had to put a stick in the door so people could come in."
Ana C. Day's insight:

“We had this need, I thought, to reach beyond our standard people taking entomology who required it for their discipline,” Turpin said. “I kept arguing that we as a department need to introduce a class for non-science people. We need more people to take entomology.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Forget Meat & Fish, Insects are 2017’s Highest Trending Source of Protein

Forget Meat & Fish, Insects are 2017’s Highest Trending Source of Protein | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
With news of a rapidly increasing population and the constant search for new food sources, particularly protein, to meet popular demand; it’s perhaps unsurprising that (disregarding unpleasant connotations) insects have become such a popular dietary addition.

It’s estimated that over two billion people, worldwide, consume bugs as part of their daily diet, while in a BBC interview earlier this year Hollywood Actress Angelina Jolie revealed that she and her children regularly enjoy eating insects. Once we’re able to overcome the “yuck factor” – a term coined by the Waste and Resources Action Programme – insects are not only an environmentally sustainable food, they’re also highly nutritious.

Back in 2013, two friends Shami Radia and Neil Whippey formed Eat Grub, encouraging people to embrace insects as a food source. In his marketing work with international charities, Shami travelled to many countries around the world including Malawi, where he saw a whole community’s excitement at roasting and eating flying termites as well as how great they could taste. Neil’s interest in exploring new foods, on the other hand, was kindled by a diagnosis of Crohn’s Disease at the age of 19.
more...
No comment yet.