Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Are bugs really the future of food? I tried them to find out | Factor

Are bugs really the future of food? I tried them to find out | Factor | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
We keep being told that in the future we’ll all be eating bugs. They’re high in protein, highly sustainable and represent a cheaper alternative to beef and oth
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Is FAO turning its back on Edible Insects?: FAO’s Senior Forestry Officer Paul Vantomme retires! - 4ento

Is FAO turning its back on Edible Insects?: FAO’s Senior Forestry Officer Paul Vantomme retires! - 4ento | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Who doesn´t know Paul? The man behind Edible Insects to whom we look for advise and support! A personality in his own right, who has managed to create an amalgam between industry and academia, always making sure the sector will get to move forward. Well, after 25 years of FAO service, our guiding star takes his well-deserved retirement February 1st and I want to invite you to take two minutes to let him know how much his support and knowledge meant to you and your business or project over these years !! Thanks Paul for your #edibleinsect knowledge and support[...]
Ana C. Day's insight:

WHO IS GOING TO REPLACE Mr. Vantomme? Who will be our Ento-Godfather, our glue?

It is my understanding that, so far, nobody has been nominated by his director, Eva Muller (eva.muller@fao.org), to replace him. Is his post at FAO being abolished? In any case, who will look out for the maintenance of any of his previous activities now that he is gone? What about further updates on the webpage Directory, legal studies, networking, projects, meetings and so on?? And it gets worse…! The word INSECTS does not even appear in the official FAO workplans for the years 2016/17 !

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Raymond WM Fung's curator insight, April 3, 12:02 AM

WHO IS GOING TO REPLACE Mr. Vantomme? Who will be our Ento-Godfather, our glue?

It is my understanding that, so far, nobody has been nominated by his director, Eva Muller (eva.muller@fao.org), to replace him. Is his post at FAO being abolished? In any case, who will look out for the maintenance of any of his previous activities now that he is gone? What about further updates on the webpage Directory, legal studies, networking, projects, meetings and so on?? And it gets worse…! The word INSECTS does not even appear in the official FAO workplans for the years 2016/17 !

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Yummy or...? 5 creepy and delicious insects every Nigerian should try before they die (photos) ▷ NAIJ.COM

Would you ever eat a plate full of insects? Sure, most people would say ‘NO’ and even shake their heads in disgust.

Insects are considered as a good source of protein by some people and many Nigerians eat it.

Insects are plentiful and many are safe to eat but a few of them are dangerous.

Though they look creepy and poisonous, insects are healthy, nutritious, as well as delicious.

Edible insects have long been a part of the human diet and are consumed by a good number of people. They often contain high-quality protein, vitamins, minerals and amino acids for humans.

Some Nigerians are very adventurous with food and they eat insects which they consider a delicacy.
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Gathr adds coffee and raspberry flavours to its cricket snack bars

Gathr adds coffee and raspberry flavours to its cricket snack bars | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Gathr – the UK innovator in cricket flour snack bars – has launched two new flavours of its Crobar in smaller 30g sizes for a more convenient on-the-go snack.

The new bars have been made available to the trade with a recommended retail price of £1.79 per bar. The new flavour variants are coffee and vanilla, as well as raspberry and cacao, both of which will join the brand’s existing peanut and cacao flavours.

The delicate notes of coffee in the coffee and vanilla bar offer a more adult flavour and go perfectly with the subtle hints of vanilla, the brand said, while the zing of raspberries complements the warmth of the cacao in the new raspberry and cacao bar. All of the Crobar range contains real fruit and nuts, protein-rich cricket flour and no gluten, dairy, soy or added sugar or sweeteners.
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Insects – soon to be a regulated food? - Think Tank

Insects – soon to be a regulated food? - Think Tank | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
There is increasing interest in the EU – as in other parts of the world – about how to make use of insect protein in animal feed and human food. While most EU Member States have forbidden the use of insects as human food, others have adopted a more flexible approach, allowing some products on their markets. Until now, EU legislation on insects for human food had had an uncertain stance, but the revised Regulation on novel foods will change this.
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Why don’t we eat bugs? - Journal of the San Juan Islands

Why don’t we eat bugs? - Journal of the San Juan Islands | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Have you ever swallowed a bug? More than 80 percent of the world's cultures eat insects - why don't we? According to the United Nations, insects could very well be the food of the future. Raising grasshoppers as a food source could combat world hunger and reduce harmful greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 60 percent. Please join us on Monday, June 27th at the San Juan Island Library as David Gordon, the author of The Eat-a-Bug Cookbook takes us on an adventure in entomophagy [eating bugs], and prepare yourself for the next big revolution in food production – using crickets, mealworms, and other eco-friendly alternatives to meat. The program concludes with free samples of edible insect snacks for everyone who attends.

About David George Gordon
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‘Non-synthetic’ food colours: Acceptable compromise or too far from nature?

‘Non-synthetic’ food colours: Acceptable compromise or too far from nature? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

The firm claims the pigment has “superb” stability. It brands the insoluble combination of silica and iron oxide as a “mineral-based and non-artificial dye alternative” to synthetic colours like Allura Red (E 129)and non-vegan pigments like Carmine (E 120).

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Hungry? Modular insect farm harvests insects for food | Daily Mail Online

Hungry? Modular insect farm harvests insects for food | Daily Mail Online | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Harvesting insects for food takes takes three hundred times less water than raising livestock.
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Insects can help tackle food Insecurity

Insects can help tackle food Insecurity | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In recent times, the use of insects as food and feed has probably become one of the most exciting topics in entomology. While it is reported that over 2,000 species are known to be edible globally, consumption of edible insects in Kenya is gradually being embraced.

In their recent publication on “Contribution to the knowledge of entomophagy in Africa”, Dr. Sunday Ekesi and Saliou Niassy from icipe and University of Pretoria respectively cited that the use of insects as food is being advocated for due to their high nutrient composition, high   feed conversion efficiencies, organic wastes conversion, the lower requirements for land and water, lower emissions of greenhouse gases and the fact that they have a significant role to play in today’s debate surrounding food and nutritional security.
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This Man Is a Legit Professional Caveman

This Man Is a Legit Professional Caveman | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Nowadays, Durant is more focused on eating insects than he is on cutting open wild-grazing hoofed animals. As an advisor to the cricket-based protein bar company EXO ("Crickets Are the New Kale" is its slogan), the caveman wants to make insect protein a more widely accepted source of sustainable protein. "What's great about it is that crickets are a high quality complete protein, yet require far fewer resources than meat," he says. "And people in the Paleo community are really leading the charge on this."
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Edible Insects as tribal food among the Rabhas of Assam - IRA-International Journal of Management & Social Sciences Dataverse

Edible Insects as tribal food among the Rabhas of Assam - IRA-International Journal of Management & Social Sciences Dataverse | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects are highly specialized group belonging to the largest animal phyla, Arthropoda. It is in folk mind of the people that they are enemies of mankind but there are number of insects which are beneficial to man in a number of ways so much so that same can be considered more or less indispensible to man. Edible insects are a natural renewable resource that provides food to many ethnic groups abroad and North East India too. Some of these species are overexploited because of increased consumption, caused by the huge human population growth in the area. The rural people hunt or collect different kinds of resources, in order to have more means to satiate their hunger, but the quantity or quality of foods found is unequal depending on the place, season and people seeking these foods. Insects are a healthy, nutritious and a savoury meal. Species of insects are collectedaccording to their seasonal presence and abundance. Most people in developed countries dislike or hesitate to consume them – probably because they are repulsed by the appearance of insects, not their taste.Tribal people especially Rabha people of Assam have chosen to take entomophagy as a sustainable source of food as it has been using since ancient times, a knowledge which has been passed down from generation to generation through word of mouth.
Ana C. Day's insight:

T"he Rabhas are a tribe belonging to the great Bodo family and scattered in parts of lower Assam, Kamrup district, Goalpara district, parts of West Bengal and Meghalaya. Some edible insects consumed by Rabha people in lower Assam in India are cricket, grasshoppers, water giant bug (Bellostoma) termites, red ants, beetle larvae, pupa of insects, water skater (Gerridaec) etc. Edible insects, among the Rabhas, are not used as emergency during food shortages, but are included as a planned part of the diet throughout the year or when seasonally available. Insects can be accepted favourably in the future by processing and mixing them with other foodstuffs."

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6 Ideas For Dinner Tonight: Pancetta

6 Ideas For Dinner Tonight: Pancetta | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Where Food, Drink & Culture Unite
Ana C. Day's insight:
RECIPE: ROASTED TOMATO AND PANCETTA PIZZA WITH CRICKET FLOUR DOUGH

Cricket flour is fast becoming one of my favorite insect-based ingredients to cook with. It’s such a versatile product, and this rosemary pizza dough is a prime example of why. It’s super-easy to make, and the mixture rises fast, so you’ll have a slice in hand well before any home-delivered alternative."

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Crunch time for the insect industry

Crunch time for the insect industry | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
'Have you tried cricket yet?"The question pops up at the top of the New York-based Exo company's website. It sounds uninviting for those who imagine the whole body of a bug. But don't judge. Scroll down.

You'll find energy bars made with cricket flour in fashionably minimalist packages with the company's eye-catching logo. The product is marketed as being a rich source of protein and gluten free. One bar contains 40 crickets and the equivalent of 10g of protein.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Massimo Reverberi, the Italian-born director of start-up Bugsolutely -- the only Bangkok-based company that produces pasta from cricket flour made in Thailand -- also sees the potential nutritional and... 

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/special-reports/1007977/crunch-time-forthe-insect-industry. View our policies at http://goo.gl/9HgTd and http://goo.gl/ou6Ip. © Post Publishing PCL. All rights reserved."

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June 27: Adventures in Entomophagy - San Juan Island

According to author David George Gordon, by raising grasshoppers instead of cattle we could curb harmful greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 60 percent. Gordon, author of The Eat-a-Bug Cookbook, presents an adventure in bug eating and explains how to prepare yourself for the next big revolution in food production—using crickets, mealworms and other eco-friendly alternatives to beef, chicken and pork. This free event takes place at 7 p.m. Monday, June 27, 2016 at San Juan Island Library. Refreshments are courtesy of the Friends of the Library and the presenter--there’ll be plenty of bugs to go around!
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Stamford museum holds “Insect Extravaganza”

Stamford museum holds “Insect Extravaganza” | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The event, “Insect Extravaganza,” will take place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday at the 39 Scofieldtown Road center.
Participants will explore the world of six-legged creatures and other invertebrates and search for insects in the nature center’s stream, pond and forest. They will also have the chance to try some edible insects and enjoy insect-themed crafts.
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These Brothers Eat Crickets and They Think You Should Too

These Brothers Eat Crickets and They Think You Should Too | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Darren Goldin and his brothers had been farming crickets for reptile feed when a UN report on the future of food highlighted insect protein as a good way to feed growing the world’s growing population. Today, the brothers’ business Entomo Farms is producing ten million crickets a week, all for human consumption. (Video by Katherine Wells, Lucy Wells) (Source: Bloomberg)
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Eating Insects: The Future of Sustainable Food Systems, Natural Medicine, and Livestock production

Published on Jun 20, 2016
This research project explores the role that insects play in the development of future sustainable food systems. As the human population increases, we must expand our food sources beyond the limitations of western taboos. Insects contain powerful nutrient profiles that are integral to ensuring food security. Insects also present an opportunity to produce food with limited ecological impacts compared to the resource intensive food production systems currently popular in North America. This project also explores the historical use of traditional insect and arthropod based medicine in regions including East Asia, Africa, and South America. Specific use cases for species of arthropods that have been popular for thousands of years in folk medicine are explored. Health systems reliant on arthropods are important to the world, especially in poorer nations where modern biomedicine is simply not accessible. Finally, outside of the roles that insects play in ensuring future food security, and developing future medicinal products, they will also play a large role in the future redesigning of our global livestock industry. Insects make a good replacement to our resource intensive plant based animal feed, and can play a role in lessening the environmental impact of our meat based protein production. - Property of Drake Tanner Shipway. Produced for Dr. Robin Oakley at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
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Grub's up! How eating insects could benefit health

Grub's up! How eating insects could benefit health | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Fighting malnutrition with insect consumption
The benefits of entomophagy do not stop at weight loss; the UN say eating insects could help combat malnutrition, which is widespread in developing countries.

According to UNICEF, worldwide, almost half of all deaths among children under the age of 5 years are a result of malnutrition, with most of these deaths occurring in Asia and Africa.

A lack of nutrition, whether due to not having enough to eat or the inability to digest the food that is eaten, can increase the risk of life-threatening disease. What is more, malnutrition in the first 1,000 days of life can lead to stunted growth, which can impair cognitive function.

As well as being a very good source of healthy fats and protein, insects are everywhere, meaning they are a very accessible, cheap source of food - a fact that could really benefit low- and middle-income countries where malnutrition is common.
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Elise impresses MasterChef guest Luke Nguyen with cricket dessert

Elise impresses MasterChef guest Luke Nguyen with cricket dessert | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Sunday night's episode of MasterChef saw chef Luke Nguyen give contestants a mystery box which included crickets to create a dish in 60 minutes.

With the power apron in play the contestants got creative and it was Elise and an inventive dessert that won her the coveted apron for the next cook. 

Luke was impressed with her dish telling her: 'It's stunning to look at and you had all the textures we were talking about. And the crickets are in there as well, so, wow, hey, congratulations!'
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Food News Roundup: Make Money By Instagramming, Eat Crickets In An Emergency, Watch Cats Shop For Groceries

Food News Roundup: Make Money By Instagramming, Eat Crickets In An Emergency, Watch Cats Shop For Groceries | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Crickets: Part of the dystopian diet
During a disaster, should food become scarce, what will we turn to for nutrition and protein? An urban design and architecture group, Terreform Open Network Ecology, thinks it’s going to be crickets, CNN reports. The group has designed a special type of shelter that will house and protect you while it farms crickets for your enjoyment. The idea doesn’t sound so far-fetched at a time when cricket-flour pizza and cricket bitters are easing their way to the mass market and onto your plates. The prototype is currently on display in the Brooklyn Navy Yard.
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Taste Test Friday: Banza chickpea pasta with One Hop Kitchen Bolognese offers a twist on a classic

Taste Test Friday: Banza chickpea pasta with One Hop Kitchen Bolognese offers a twist on a classic | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
On the menu for this edition of Taste Test Friday is a blind sampling of a classic American-Italian meal: pasta with Bolognese sauce – but with a twist. 
The pasta isn’t the average semolina spaghetti most Americans eat. Rather, it is made from chickpeas by Banza , a promising startup with an expanding distribution and growing portfolio of the legume-based pasta. 

And the Bolognese isn’t the typical beef variety. It is One Hop Kitchen’s Cricket and Mealworm Bolognese sauces , which uses texturized insect protein created by C-Fu FOODS , the founders of which also recently launched One Hop Kitchen as a way to help introduce edible insects to more Americans.  
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Contribution to the knowledge of entomophagy in Africa: Journal of Insects as Food and Feed: Vol 2, No 3

Contribution to the knowledge of entomophagy in Africa: Journal of Insects as Food and Feed: Vol 2, No 3 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract
The use of insects as food and feed is probably one of the most exciting topics in entomology in recent times. It is estimated that over 2 billion people worldwide consume insects and with the expanding interest on the subject, an exponential increase of this figure is highly likely. Insects are the largest and the most diverse group of organisms in the animal kingdom, with over 1 million species identified. Globally over 2,000 species are known to be edible and Africa alone consumes ~500 different species.
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One Hop Kitchen expands edible insects beyond baked goods into pasta sauce

One Hop Kitchen expands edible insects beyond baked goods into pasta sauce | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Next priority: soluble insect protein powders

When One Hop Kitchen’s Indiegogo campaign ends, Cadesky and his brother’s fundraising efforts won’t. They plan to continue to raise their series A seed funds to create a production line for C-Fu FOODS soluble insect powders.

The powders “offer a really great economic opportunity if you look at the bodybuilder and the fitness community, where the fans in that space are very die-hard and passionate about their bodies and their health and their nutrition. And I think this is an opportunity for them to be open to new sources of protein.”

But are Americans ready to be open to eating insect protein on their pasta? FoodNavigator-USA tested the idea – and One Hop Kitchen’s cricket and mealworm sauces – on five unsuspecting consumers. Find out what they said in this week’s Taste Test Friday.
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Diners to be Dished Up Great Grub | Scoop News

Diners to be Dished Up Great Grub | Scoop News | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Monday, 13 June 2016, 10:15 am
Press Release: Space Academy
Diners to be Dished Up Great Grub

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Monday 13th June 2016

A lucky selection of Christchurch diners will be served up dishes of insects on Wednesday night.

The sold-out dinner is hosted by plant-centric chef Alex Davies at Space Academy as part of the bi-weekly Gatherings series. It will feature a range of tasty dishes, all featuring insects of various kinds.

“I’ve been trialing some tasty combinations including Tempura Locusts with Celeriac, as well as Pickled Mushrooms and Cricket Gravy,” says Davies.

Those insects are being supplied by Christchurch startup Grub Supply, which was founded in April during the local Startup Weekend in which teams have 54 hours to launch new companies.

“Humans are facing a challenge around food security and sustainability,” says co-founder Peter Randrup, who’s joined by seven other co-founders.

“We have united around this problem and believe edible insects will play a major role in the future food mix. Bugs are good for your health, good for your pocket, and good for the planet.”
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Cicadas on the menu for Stow foodie

Cicadas on the menu for Stow foodie | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Stow: Cicadas. For Don Xu, they’re what’s for dinner.
Xu, a self-described foodie, could hardly wait for the 17-year cicadas to emerge last month so he could fry some up and taste them. He cooked his first batch shortly after they started appearing in his yard in mid-May and has prepared them a few times since.
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Insects as food trend changing palates, lives

Insects as food trend changing palates, lives | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
On shelves at Summerhill Market, a Toronto grocery store, there are mealworm protein balls and scrumptious cricket key lime pie. Last year, chef Meeru Dhalwala put delicacies like a flatbread made from cricket flour on the menu at her popular Vij and Rangoli restaurants in Vancouver. And two years ago, New Millennium Farms in Norwood, Ont., became North America's first agricultural business raising and processing insects for consumer meals. These entrepreneurs are at the leading edge of what food bloggers say will be the top food trend of 2016.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Aspire CEO Mohammed Ashour tells us he is stunned to see the benefits of his insect enterprise beyond improving nutrition and incomes. Ashour recalls an elderly man in Brong Hofo, Ghana. John had retired with no savings, becoming a burden for his family. Then he took up weevil farming. John is happier now that he's productive again. And he's bonding with his grandchildren who help him out with his insect endeavor."

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