Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Bugs and Beer: The Art of Pairing Craft Beer and Crickets

Bugs and Beer: The Art of Pairing Craft Beer and Crickets | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Step aside Garrett Oliver, because we've got some craft beer pairings that are sure to expand some palates...not to mention some comfort levels. Being in the beer and food (or beer as food) writing...
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Is FAO turning its back on Edible Insects?: FAO’s Senior Forestry Officer Paul Vantomme retires! - 4ento

Is FAO turning its back on Edible Insects?: FAO’s Senior Forestry Officer Paul Vantomme retires! - 4ento | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Who doesn´t know Paul? The man behind Edible Insects to whom we look for advise and support! A personality in his own right, who has managed to create an amalgam between industry and academia, always making sure the sector will get to move forward. Well, after 25 years of FAO service, our guiding star takes his well-deserved retirement February 1st and I want to invite you to take two minutes to let him know how much his support and knowledge meant to you and your business or project over these years !! Thanks Paul for your #edibleinsect knowledge and support[...]
Ana C. Day's insight:

WHO IS GOING TO REPLACE Mr. Vantomme? Who will be our Ento-Godfather, our glue?

It is my understanding that, so far, nobody has been nominated by his director, Eva Muller (eva.muller@fao.org), to replace him. Is his post at FAO being abolished? In any case, who will look out for the maintenance of any of his previous activities now that he is gone? What about further updates on the webpage Directory, legal studies, networking, projects, meetings and so on?? And it gets worse…! The word INSECTS does not even appear in the official FAO workplans for the years 2016/17 !

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Raymond WM Fung's curator insight, April 3, 12:02 AM

WHO IS GOING TO REPLACE Mr. Vantomme? Who will be our Ento-Godfather, our glue?

It is my understanding that, so far, nobody has been nominated by his director, Eva Muller (eva.muller@fao.org), to replace him. Is his post at FAO being abolished? In any case, who will look out for the maintenance of any of his previous activities now that he is gone? What about further updates on the webpage Directory, legal studies, networking, projects, meetings and so on?? And it gets worse…! The word INSECTS does not even appear in the official FAO workplans for the years 2016/17 !

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Entomo Farms rides the edible insects wave: ‘Things really exploded for us in 2015’

Entomo Farms rides the edible insects wave: ‘Things really exploded for us in 2015’ | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
2015 was a difficult year for some in the embryonic edible insect ingredients business, with Big Cricket Farms suspending activities due to water supply problems and All Things Bugs facing significant challenges. However, Ontario, Canada-based Entomo Farms had a bumper year, says president Dr Jarrod Goldin.
“Things really exploded last year and they don’t seem to be slowing down in 2016,” he told FoodNavigator-USA.

“My brothers [Darren and Ryan Goldin] have been raising crickets for the pet market [exotic pets such as reptiles eat live insects] for more than a decade, but on the human food side, we only got started in January 2014 with 5,000sq ft [the pet business - Reptile Feeders - operates at a different location] and today, we’ve got a 60,000sq ft farm with a 3,500 sq ft processing facility.

"We’re looking to get to 100,000sq ft by the end of the fall, so we’re expanding very rapidly,” added Dr Goldin, who has made a career as a chiropractor, but now supplies the two highest-profile players in the US edible insects space, EXO and Chapul, plus scores of other customers in North America and beyond.
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A mealworm meal?: Dal students' food startup goes international

A mealworm meal?: Dal students' food startup goes international | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Sparking an interest

Holly first became interested in entomophagy (that is, the consuming of insects as a food source) after giving a two-hour presentation on the subject in her Agriculture and Contemporary Issues class.

“This allowed me to explore a current agriculture topic and discuss it with the class,” she explains. “Since I was planning on studying entomology, I decided to pick the topic of consuming insects, and was absolutely blown away by the possibilities of using insects as a food source.
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Modular cricket farm lets you grow thousands of 'free-range' insects in the city

Modular cricket farm lets you grow thousands of 'free-range' insects in the city | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Sustainable food is a booming trend, especially when it comes to people finding ways to eat locally and grow their own food. Enter the Cricket Shelter. It’s a modular urban insect farm that promises an easy and efficient way to raise crickets as a sustainable source of protein. To be clear, we’re talking about raising crickets in order to eat them. Designers of the insect farm created it to help people in developing nations after natural disasters, but they think the trend could take off in America, too.
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Pezt: Normalizing Insects in the Kitchens

Pezt: Normalizing Insects in the Kitchens | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Project Overview
Insects are an extremely efficient and healthy source of daily protein and nutrients, already historically consumed by 80% of the world's cultures - but uptake has been slow in the western world. Why is this?
Pezt attempts to normalize insects in the kitchen - as with most fears, our distaste from insects come from familiarity. We simply aren't familiar enough with eating insects, especially in the form that they currently exist. By taking traditional mealworm-farming techniques and compressing them into a white-goods appliance, we can understand and better relate to the facts of insect consumption instead of letting phobias rule our eating habits. 90% reduction in waste feed, 93% reduction in land use, and a 99.95% reduction in water usage.
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Amazon.com: Insects as Sustainable Food Ingredients: Production, Processing and Food Applications (9780128028568): Aaron T. Dossey, Juan A. Morales-Ramos, M. Guadalupe Rojas: Books

Amazon.com: Insects as Sustainable Food Ingredients: Production, Processing and Food Applications (9780128028568): Aaron T. Dossey, Juan A. Morales-Ramos, M. Guadalupe Rojas: Books
Ana C. Day's insight:
  • Details state and future directions of insects as a sustainable source of protein, food, feed, medicines and other useful biomaterials
  • Provides valuable guidance useful to anyone interested in utilizing insects as food ingredients and in insects as an alternative protein/nutrient source in general (food companies, nutritionists, entomologists, food entrepreneurs, athletes, etc)
  • Summarizes the current state of the art as well as provide helpful recommendations on which others can build companies, products and research program Researchers, entrepreneurs, farmers, policy makers and anyone interested in insect mass production and industrial use of insects
  • Outlines the challenges, and the opportunities, faced by this emerging industry
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Tiny Farms: a network to re-think the edible insects farming - Entomofago

Tiny Farms: a network to re-think the edible insects farming - Entomofago | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
We’ve designed a system for rearing crickets that dramatically reduces labor costs - the big reason insects are so expensive today
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Bühler aims to 'close the global protein gap' with algae, insects and pulses

Bühler aims to 'close the global protein gap' with algae, insects and pulses | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A completely new value chain has to be built up," Müller said. "Starting from ensuring a safe and reliable feedstock supply for the insect, via mass rearing of insect larvae as well as their processing into insect ingredients (e.g. protein meals), and finally application of this ingredients in final products like fish feed formulations or pet food products. To be successful, all activities need to be developed at the same time. Therefore we will rely on the success of certain other companies, but by having a good network the risk is manageable."

"The regulatory framework regarding insects [for human consumption] is expected to be changed, but nobody knows, when this will be the case," she added.
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Why an agency invested in insect snack bars

Why an agency invested in insect snack bars | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
TOKYO — A good deal has been written recently about the nutritional and ecological benefits of adding protein from insects to the human diet. But it still comes as a surprise when an ad agency invests in the concept.

Dentsu Ventures, an investment arm of Dentsu with a capital of ¥5 billion (around $45 million), just staked an undisclosed sum in Exo, a New York-based company specializing in food products that use cricket protein.

Dentsu Ventures is an experimental division that invests in non-advertising-related enterprises that it sees as potentially useful to Dentsu’s own business in the future.
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Cockroaches, Bees, Crickets and Big Data may just save lives

Cockroaches, Bees, Crickets and Big Data may just save lives | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Big Data News, Events, and Expert Opinion
Ana C. Day's insight:
"IOT DRIVEN CRICKET FARMS AS A NEW FOOD SOURCE

Another notable trend in the last year Is it last year is harvesting insects as a means for consumption and generally a source of protein. The act of humans eating insects known as entomophagy is widely adopted. According to article written in the Guardian, 80% of the world’s nation eats 1000 species of insects. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) published a paper titled Edible Insects – Future Prospects for Food and Feed Security stating that “insect harvesting/rearing is a low tech, low-capital investment option…” So it comes as no surprise that startups like Exo, Chapul and Tiny Farms have been popping up and receiving a lot of interest and funding for their cricket flour and cricket bars. According to IoT Journal, Tiny Farms in particular uses IoT technology and sensors to build and optimize their scalable farms. CEO Dan Imrie-Situnayake also discussed that they collect a lot of data to determine “the best approaches to insect farming, pinning down what works and what doesn’t."

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Inspired Students Take Hormones and Algae to a Whole New Level in the Lexus Eco Challenge | Lexus

Inspired Students Take Hormones and Algae to a Whole New Level in the Lexus Eco Challenge | Lexus | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Inspired Students Take Hormones and Algae to a Whole New Level in the Lexus Eco Challenge
Ana C. Day's insight:

High School First Prize Winners
CA – La Crescenta
Clark Magnet High School CCBB Cricket Busters Educated the community about overfishing and explored the benefits of an alternative source of protein (insects).

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50 startups go to bat (and one walks home with cash) in the first-ever PitchfestNW

50 startups go to bat (and one walks home with cash) in the first-ever PitchfestNW | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Poda Foods is a Portland, Oregon-based startup that raises and harvests crickets to create a cricket-based protein powder. Yes, you read that correctly, a cricket-based protein powder.
While certainly odd, Poda Foods co-founder and CEO Yesenia Gallardo shared with the PitchfestNW judges just how beneficial crickets are to the food industry. After citing the many downsides of the meat industry — like methane production and excessive water consumption — Gallardo pointed to crickets as a reasonable solution. Not only do they require little food to stay alive, but crickets quickly convert their food into mass, allowing them to boast a higher protein value than chicken, eggs, salmon, or beef jerky.
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Protein That Crawls: 11 Startups Trying To Get Us To Eat Bugs

Protein That Crawls: 11 Startups Trying To Get Us To Eat Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
From cricket flour-based chips and cookies, to mealworm and fruit fly larvae-based foods, these startups are on a mission to take insect-eating mainstream.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Silicon Valley prides itself on powering the sort of innovation that feels more appropriate to a science fiction movie than real life: self-driving cars, virtual reality, and military-grade robots. But right now, a group of startups with plugged-in investors are working on a project that is considerably less lofty, if still fairly ambitious. That project? Convincing the American public to eat bugs."

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Bugs Are The Future - The Food Rush

Bugs Are The Future - The Food Rush | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Can you remember back to the days when sushi wasn’t on the menu? You couldn’t get it on a revolving conveyor belt, at an all-you-can-eat Asian buffet and certainly not in the chilled section of the supermarket. How times have changed!
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Why all this interest in bugs and insects as food?

Because they’re a great source of protein and nutrition, as well as being a wonderfully sustainable food source. Insects take just a fraction of the feed and water input required to grow vs traditional livestock such as beef or poultry, and take very little land, unlike other plants farmed for protein such as soy. Insects also produce almost no methane gas – a huge benefit when you consider farmed livestock are currently responsible for more methane pollution than all global transport combined according to the FAO.

With a growing population, an increasing awareness of the environmental impacts of livestock and a need to produce even more food from our limited resources, insects provide a very real solution for future generations."

 

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Coconut and Cricket crazy? Findings from the Natural & Organic Products Europe (NOPE) and Food and Drink Expo (FDE) 2016

Coconut and Cricket crazy? Findings from the Natural & Organic Products Europe (NOPE) and Food and Drink Expo (FDE) 2016 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
2016 is the year of the cricket flour energy protein bars with a number of brands competing for market share in this new up and coming area for the Western world (albeit that consumption of insects has been commonplace in many Asian cultures for many centuries).

Nutritionally crickets are said to possess superior dietary protein than other animal sources and have higher iron content than spinach as well as a better omega 3 and 6 ratio than hemp, soy and whey.

Not to mention the environmental benefits of crickets emitting 80 times less carbon dioxide and requiring 12 times less feed than cattle.
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It’s bugging me, what will be the big trends in insect protein?

It’s bugging me, what will be the big trends in insect protein? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
What do you think? Has this insect craze got (4) legs, or will it crawl away and die? Let us know in the comments section below or join our community of food and drink entrepreneurs online and discuss.

Coming next, a tasting face-off between the UK’s and USA’s favourite cricket flour snack bars.
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Grub's Up: How insects can help feed the world - Mega

Grub's Up: How insects can help feed the world - Mega | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
As the global population approaches 7.5 billion and newly affluent emerging middle classes switch to western-style, protein-rich diets, insects could provide an environmentally sustainable way to put food on people’s plates.
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From Soil To Supper Club: Vogue Tries Eating Grubs

From Soil To Supper Club: Vogue Tries Eating Grubs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Acclaimed chef René Redzepi tried ants on his menu at Noma in Copenhagen.  And now here in the UK, Sebastian Holmes, the founding head chef at Soho's acclaimed Thai restaurant The Smoking Goat, is also championing the culinary delights of bugs. He recently teamed up with Shami Radia and Neil Whippey to release their debut cookbook, Eat Grub, tempting us with smoky cod and buffalo worm cakes, scrambled eggs and ants, and cricket flour scones.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"There are even cocktail recipes - anyone for a mealworm margarita?  He has been working with Shami Radia and Neil Whippey, who founded Grub in 2014, a food company attempting to bring insects to our tables. They farm insects in Holland and package them in pleasingly minimal cool packaging. Buffalo worms, crickets and grasshoppers are all freeze-dried to keep in your store cupboard. This didn't stop me flinching in disgust when they arrived at my desk in Vogue House."

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Eating bugs: Recipes, pictures and a review of cricket powder, crickets and mealworms!

Eating bugs: Recipes, pictures and a review of cricket powder, crickets and mealworms! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Trust me, eating crickets and mealworms was not on my radar 3 weeks ago. Sure, I'd forced down a chocolate coated cricket years ago at a bug exhibit at the Royal Botanical Gardens in Burlington, but that was the end of my bug eating. Until last week. I stumbled upon a picture of delicious looking almond…
Ana C. Day's insight:
  • is low in fat
  • is high in iron
  • is high in calcium
  • has 9 essential amino acids
  • contains the ideal Omega 6 to Omega 3 fatty acid ratio of 3:1
  • is a source of vitamin B12
  • is organic
  • is high in fibre
  • is low in calories
  • is available gluten free
  • is non-GMO
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Swedish Government To Spend Millions To Encourage Citizens To Trade Meat For Insects To End Global Warming

Swedish Government To Spend Millions To Encourage Citizens To Trade Meat For Insects To End Global Warming | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The Swedish government is showing their commitment to green principles and fighting climate change by spending tax payer money on developing ‘meat’ made out of crickets and mealworms.

Vinnova, the Swedish government agency that distributes money for research and development, spending some 2.7 billion kronor (£230 million) a year has announced its latest tranche of funding for creating a greener, more sustainable future — by weaning Europe off meat. It is hoped people will want to eat a so-called “climate smart” diet instead, reports FriaTider.

Green activists and the United Nations are behind such political initiatives as ‘Meat Free Mondays’ — a gateway to full vegetarianism — which are based on the premise that meat consumption is driving man-made climate change. Another method to reduce that so-called burden on the earth is replacing meat protein with that harvested from insects instead.
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Documentaries for dorks who care about democracy and diets

Documentaries for dorks who care about democracy and diets | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
BUGS

In the delightfully disgusting documentary BUGS (74 mins), we follow two men intent on bringing edible insects into the public eye. At the Nordic Food Lab in Denmark, they test different recipes that include insects, trying to create something that is both nutritious and delicious.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"We are taken on a ride around the world with Josh and Ben, who visit Africa, Australia, Japan, Netherlands, and Puerto Rico, exploring various farms and sites where edible bugs are harvested. They ingest everything they can, including maggots, worms, ants, termites, locusts, crickets, beetles, flies, larvae of every sort, and honey from stingless bees. Their particular favorite: black soldier fly larvae fat.

At one point in my notes I wrote: "I feel itchy."

The visits with self-sustaining insect farmers in Africa was a revelation to the pair, who found that not only are insects a sustainable food source, they are also a primary food source, not replacing anything or filling diet gaps in any way. They also found some drawbacks: collecting insects at night under bright lights can cause blindness, which is an epidemic in some communities. But farmed insects just do not taste as good as those found in the wild.*

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Entomophagy Won't Kill You: You're Already Eating Bugs

Entomophagy Won't Kill You: You're Already Eating Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Eating bugs is generally taboo, but most people have unknowingly been doing it our whole lives. It’s time to accept entomophagy as a dietary necessity.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Urban legend tells us that the average person eats eight spiders in their sleep per year. Of course, there is no way of testing this statistic without carefully documenting nightly bug intake of a group of people – and who has time for that?

While we may or may not be swallowing arachnids during our nightly snoozes, we are likely consuming more than this made-up number during the day: most food products contain FDA-accepted levels of bug heads, wings, and throats, which we’ve been eating all our lives."

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Would you eat snacks made with crickets? Canadian insect farmer hopes so

Would you eat snacks made with crickets? Canadian insect farmer hopes so | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
ach week, we seek expert advice to help a small or medium-sized business overcome a key issue.

There’s a two-week window in cricket farming where the orchestra of sexually mature males, tens of thousands of them, rub their forewings together and create a deafening crescendo, filling GrowHop Cricket Products’ 1,200-square foot warehouse in Ottawa. The sound expands and contracts until Andrew Afelskie, the startup’s founder and self-proclaimed farmer-in-chief, saunters through the door.
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The 'Cricket Shelter' Lets You Farm Insects in the City

The 'Cricket Shelter' Lets You Farm Insects in the City | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects could be the protein source of the future.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The Cricket Shelter is a structure that consists of pods built to hold thousands of crickets. It was designed by the architecture firm Terreform and currently occupies a dock at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. If the idea takes off, the shelters could be used by small food producers to raise crickets on rooftops and empty lots in urban areas.

Not only does the Cricket Shelter house around 22,000 insects, it also cleans up after them at the same time. It's designed to collect dead crickets and their waste and makes them easy to dispose. The structure gives crickets plenty of room to roam around while still fitting in as many insects as possible. And when they're ready to harvest, all the insect farmer needs to do is turn a dial on the pod to empty them out."

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What will it take for Western countries to start eating insects? |

What will it take for Western countries to start eating insects? | | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Human beings have been consuming insects for thousands of years. The practice of eating insects, known as Entomophagy, is common in most parts of Asia, Africa, South America, Australia and New Zealand. In fact, more than 80% of the world’s nations continue to eat insects on a regular basis!

However, many Western countries do not include insects in their diet. Scientists suspect this is because Anglo-Saxons originated from colder climates — where insects were less common. Insects became viewed as a pest and not a food source.

It is unfortunate because there are many health and environment benefits obtained from eating edible insects. People in the West are missing out on a delicious and nutritious source of food!
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Edible insects: Why chefs should embrace 'nature's best kept secret'

Edible insects: Why chefs should embrace 'nature's best kept secret' | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Benefits

Bentham said the benefits for restaurant owners went beyond giving them a point of difference from using a relatively new ingredient for the western market. 

"The powder is a unique flavour that can’t be likened to anything. It has a rich nutty taste which really adds something to the flavour of dishes, but there’s also the benefit of knowing that you’ve added a product that is zero sugar, has good fats and with strong protein levels and micro-nutrients, so it’s adding a health base to that dish that has been created," he said. 

“By 2050 we are going to have 9.5bn people on this planet so there is a challenge with our present farming methods to try and support this growing population. I’m not saying that insects are the silver bullet, but it’s another option to be able to pass over to restaurants as another staple food ingredient.”
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