Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Move over potato chips, it's time for cricket Chirps

Move over potato chips, it's time for cricket Chirps | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In a bid to make insect foods more palatable to the modern consumer, Six Foods is rolling out a line of high-protein chips that are based on a truly sustainable meat source: Crickets.
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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#BugsEndHunger - Eat bugs, fight for #foodsecurity. Share, donate, eat & empower! @LittleHerds #SeedsOfAction

#BugsEndHunger - Eat bugs, fight for #foodsecurity. Share, donate, eat & empower! @LittleHerds #SeedsOfAction | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
What happens when you eat bugs for 30 days? We believe it will help fuel a movement to end global malnutrition. Little Herds is proud to partner with Seeds Of Action for the #BugsEndHunger campaign. On May 1st, Seeds Of Action co-founder Jeremy Connor will begin his 30 day diet of eating bugs and plant based foods that can be found, or brought in through food aid programs, in areas where the 1 billion chronically hungry are struggling to live. This campaign will bring awareness to edible insects as a sustainable solution to food insecurity and produce a freely distributed, visually based, Farming Insects Guide (FIG) to empower communities across the planet to begin farming insects for food and economic security.
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Reading it right on Novel Foods

The programme will look at the requirements of the incoming Regulation, the points expected to be of priority in future reviews of novel foods, and the potential effects of Regulation 2015/2283 on certain food categories already present on the market, with the status of insects and insect-derived products discussed as an example.

The possible implications of the UK’s exit from the EU on UK submissions that are already going through the novel foods process will be covered, as will the effect of this issue on future novel foods assessments by the UK.

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Edible insects can help solve hunger and improve nutrition in Sumatra: Study

Edible insects can help solve hunger and improve nutrition in Sumatra: Study | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Edible insects from Sumatra can provide a strategic solution for hunger problems and subsequent undernourishment due to their high essential fatty contents, researchers have concluded.
Academics say inhabitants of the Indonesian island are faced with insufficient food supplies, and that edible insects as a traditional and readily available food source could be part of the solution.

“Throughout Indonesia, 20 million people suffer from undernourishment, which is approximately 8% of the Indonesian population,” they wrote, adding that “one in every five children suffers from malnutrition and one in every three children suffers from stunting. However, edible insects bred in Sumatra for human consumption have never before been assessed with regard to their nutritional value.

Oleic acid

Their study analysed the crude protein, chitin, fat and selected fatty acid contents of giant mealworm larvae (Zophobas morio), larvae of the common mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) and nymphs of the field cricket (Gryllus assimilis).
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The insect Industry in ASEAN: Insights with AFFIA

The insect Industry in ASEAN: Insights with AFFIA
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Better munching with insects

Better munching with insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In the face of impending food scarcity, edible insects are a newfangled protein alternative. Modern food science and technology allows culinary creativity for bug-eating beyond what one can imagine. From the creepy crawly that may not seem appetising, today we have chocolate-coated crickets, scorpion vodka, crispy silkworms and cricket snacks in myriad flavours ranging from seaweed to barbecue to cheese.
These products are increasingly crawling up the shelves.
To create better understanding of eating insects for food security, the Asean Food and Feed Insects’ Association (AFFIA) recently hosted a public seminar entitled “Insect Industry in Asean: Insights With AFFIA” at Kasetsart University in Thailand. The event brought together representatives from various sectors who shed light on the prospect of insect-based food — a growing industry and a sustainable as well as nutritional diet.
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The Gateway Bug: a documentary about the future of food

The Gateway Bug:  a documentary about the future of food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
I’ve had the privilege of getting a sneak preview of a movie called The Gateway Bug, which is a documentary about feeding humanity in an uncertain age. It will be shown in Melbourne next weekend as part of the Melbourne Documentary Film Festival.

I wrote that eating insects is a good idea back in 2013, shortly after the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) released a report suggesting that using insects for food and feed would increase food security for our planet.

Following the publication of that article, I was contacted by people who wanted to know how to start farming insects. They were looking for people to contact, for information on regulations. I was invariably unhelpful. I didn’t know the answers, and felt inadequate, but now I know that nobody knew the answers back then. We were at the very beginning of a journey.
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Edible Insect Ingredients: Sustainable Protein - Science & Food

Edible Insect Ingredients: Sustainable Protein - Science & Food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Fig. 1 – Breakdown of the major macromolecules in a cricket. Photo Credit: Lee Cadesky (C-fu Foods) A classic bolognese sauce: tomato, ground beef….and insects? Brothers Lee and Eli Cadesky, the COO and CEO behind C-fu Foods and One Hop Kitchen, are revolutionizing what it means to be a Bolognese sauce with the invention of …
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Edible insects and Global food Production

Edible insects and Global food Production | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
This research was also focused to pick such products that most consumers like and react positively. The food samples they offered consumers contained a good spread of the insect products that could be found on Australia’s market, some of which could be better received than others.

Dr Crump, the leader of this project stated that this research will aid the development of an entire industry in the future.

In Australia, edible insect production industry is still emerging but far from full development. The most important for this industry is to make improvement of customer’s acceptance of edible insects, and realizing the potential as an alternative protein source, Dr Crump pointed out.

The project hopes to be able to find enough target consumers for edible insects and ways of encouraging consumers to accept insect food as an alternative source of proteins.

There is a huge potential for edible insect industry, and the main purpose of this research is to identify not only local and domestic markets, but also the entire world market through exporting.
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Want to cook crickets? New community ed class teaches bug eating

Once you get past the crunch, grasshoppers taste almost like chicken. 

That first bite is a leap of faith, but it can open a world of possibilities for sustainable eating and managing garden pests, said Sioux Falls resident Veronica Shukla.

Shukla, who also founded Project Food Forest, a nonprofit aimed at making Sioux Falls' landscape more edible, first came across entomophagy (bug eating) on her path to finding a sustainable way of life.

And this summer, she decided to take her bug-eating knowledge to the community. 

"You have to push past that gross factor ... and then once you do it, you realize, oh, it wasn't so bad," Shukla said.

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The wonderful world of eating insects

Ever tried a prawn cocktail with woodlice instead of the prawn? Insects: An Edible Field Guide introduces us to the weird, wonderful and environmentally-friendly world of eating creepy crawlies 

Ever fancied swapping your salt and vinegar crisps for a deep fried crispy cricket? Or switching a juicy steak for a juicy huhu grub? If so, then you are not alone.  Over 2 billion people all over the world already eat insects every day as part of their regular diet, and the UK is quickly catching up with edible insects now sold in Planet Organic, Selfridges, and Fortnum & Mason’s. Sainsbury’s Basics Bugs to follow, watch this space. 

Eating bugs has been cited as a foodie trend for a few years now, but what could really tempt us to eat creepy crawlies? If it’s not curiosity, culinary adventure or taste, then it might just come down to your conscience.

Entomophagy (the practice of eating bugs) might just save the planet. Insects are relatively kind to the environment: greenhouse gas emissions of mealworms, crickets and locusts are lower by a factor of 100 in comparison to beef and pork production, and very few insects product any methane at all (with the exception of cockroaches and termites). 
 
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Silkworm flour: Where sustainable food meets fashion

Silkworm flour: Where sustainable food meets fashion | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Italbugs is preparing to market a high-protein flour derived from silkworms, a by-product of the textile industry, that is suitable for use in sports nutrition and bakery products.
The cocoons of the mulberry silk larvae (Bombyx mori) are the key raw material in silk manufacturing. While the protein fibre (fibroin) of the cocoons is woven into high-value fabric, the larvae within are usually discarded.

Although Italy's 1000-year old silk farming (sericulture) tradition collapsed in the post-war era, it has enjoyed a revival in recent years as entrepreneurs have sought to provide a traceable supply of high-quality, home-grown silk.

For Marco Ceriani, founder and CEO of Italbugs, this revival represents an opportunity to develop a new food ingredient that combines two of the biggest sustainable food trends ‒ protein from insect sources and valorisation of industrial waste.

"The idea of ​​using the Bombyx mori was natural. In 1920 in Italy there were 230 silkworm factories for silk production. In no other country (except China) was there so much work on a single insect. Silkworm is really our insect," said Ceriani.

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14 disruptive food-tech startups that will change how we eat

14 disruptive food-tech startups that will change how we eat | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Hargol, formerly Steak TzarTzar, will start exporting its grasshopper-based protein powder to North America this month. In December, the award-winning company established the world’s first commercial-scale grasshopper farm in Israel and is closing a funding round (with investors from Israel, Singapore and the US), bringing its total investment to $1 million. On May 7, Hargol won the TLV Startup Challenge in the ag-tech/food-tech category and will present at the Alltech One Ideas Conference for 4,000 agriculture and food leaders in Kentucky later this month.

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Allergic risks of consuming edible insects: A systematic review

Allergic risks of consuming edible insects: A systematic review | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract

The expected future demand for food and animal-derived protein will require environment-friendly novel food sources with high nutritional value. Insects may be one of such novel food sources. However, there needs to be an assessment of the risks associated with their consumption, including allergic risks. Therefore, we performed a systematic review aiming to analyse current data available regarding the allergic risks of consuming insects. We reviewed all reported cases of food allergy to insects, and studied the possibility of cross-reactivity and co-sensitisation between edible insects, crustaceans and house dust mites. We analysed a total of 25 articles – eight assessing the cross-reactivity/co-sensitisation between edible insects, crustaceans and house dust mite; three characterizing allergens in edible insects and 14 case reports, describing case series or prevalence studies of food allergy caused by insects. Cross-reactivity/co-sensitisation between edible insects and crustaceans seems to be clinically relevant, while it is still unknown if co-sensitisation between house dust mites and edible insects can lead to a food allergy. Additionally, more information is also needed about the molecular mechanisms underlying food allergy to insects, although current data suggest that an important role is played by arthropod pan-allergens such as tropomyosin or arginine kinase.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved
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Bug juice booze: How this product design duo is making their name in the alcohol game

Bug juice booze: How this product design duo is making their name in the alcohol game | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Bug juice is a real thing.

Skeptical? So was I when I first tried Critter Bitters, the aromatic bitters made from crickets. I couldn’t get the idea of dirt, grass, and creepy crawlies out of my mind as I prepared to take my first sip. Of course I was just being ridiculous—the bitters do not resemble bugs in the slightest. The nutty, earthy taste is more akin to toasted walnuts or woodsmoke than anything that chirps.

That’s the point.

Critter Bitters aims to help people “get over the ‘ick’ factor associated with entomophagy, or eating insects,” according to co-founders Julia Plevin and Lucy Knops. The creative duo met while earning their MFAs in Product Design at The School of Visual Arts, and have since made a name for themselves in two tricky-to-navigate fields. Not only did they concoct a successful bug-based product, but they also carved a niche for themselves in the artisanal alcohol industry, an arena which remains largely male-dominated.
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Reading it right on novel foods

Reading it right on novel foods | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
On 1 January 2018, Regulation (EC) No. 258/97 on novel foods and novel food ingredients will cease to apply, and Regulation (EU) No. 2015/2283 on novel foods will take its place. Although the incoming Regulation 2015/2283 has the same ‘cut off’ date of 15 May 1997 for defining a novel food, it brings in some changes to the authorisation process and classification categories of novel foods.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Expert speakers will meet on 27 September 2017 in London to discuss the implications of these changes such as the points expected to be of priority in future reviews of novel foods and the potential effects of Regulation 2015/2283 on certain food categories already present on the market, with the status of insects and insect-derived products discussed as an example.

Francesca Lotta, Associate, Bird & Bird, will deliver a stimulating presentation entitled ‘Authorising edible insects under the new novel food regulation.’ Francesca advises companies from Food and Beverage on regulatory requirements for innovative products, such as novel foods, food supplements and nutraceuticals. She is also gaining a reputation as edible insects’ legislation expert, advising food and feed companies."

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Your Next Source of Protein Probably Had Wings—or Grew From a Petri Dish

Your Next Source of Protein Probably Had Wings—or Grew From a Petri Dish | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Think noshing on crickets is only for those of “Fear Factor” fame? Chances are, if you’re concerned with the health of both your own body and the planet, you may soon become more adventurous with your protein sources. As the global population continues to grow over the next several decades, the world is faced with the staggering challenge of producing enough food to feed the nine billion people who will inhabit the earth by 2050. Thankfully, the rapid evolution of technology is aiding research and production into alternative sources of protein.

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The Gateway Bug: a film about the future of food - InDaily

The Gateway Bug: a film about the future of food - InDaily | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
FEATURES
A new documentary suggests that convincing people to eat insects is less of a challenge than the logistical problems surrounding their production, writes Susan Lawler.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"I’ve had the privilege of getting a sneak preview of a movie called The Gateway Bug, a documentary about feeding humanity in an uncertain age. It will be shown in Melbourne this weekend as part of the Melbourne Documentary Film Festival.

I wrote that eating insects is a good idea back in 2013, shortly after the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) released a report suggesting that using insects for food and feed would increase food security for our planet."

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To Save the Planet, Maybe It's Time to Start Eating More Insects?

To Save the Planet, Maybe It's Time to Start Eating More Insects? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
N LATE 2013, Arnold Van Huis, a professor of tropical entomology at Wageningen University in the Netherlands, conducted an experiment. He prepared two batches of meatballs: One was made entirely from beef, while the other was a 50-50 blend of beef and ground mealworms. Test subjects didn’t know which meatballs were which, and when asked which they favored, nine out of 10 chose the one mixed with mealworms.
Ana C. Day's insight:

“There’s no doubt that a wider adoption of entomophagy could help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture,” says Peter Alexander, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Edinburgh and a senior researcher at Scotland’s Rural College, who was the lead author of the study. “The benefits would arise if the consumption of insects displaces the consumption of conventional animal products.”

And there is a small but growing segment of adventurous diners who seem to agree. Globally, the consumption of edible insects generated more than $33 million in 2015 and is expected to reach $522 million by 2023. Of course, this is merely an appetizer portion when compared to the size of the global processed meat market, which racked up $714 billion in revenue in 2016 and is projected to exceed $1.5 trillion in the next five years."

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Bugging out: How we'll feed ourselves in 2167

Bugging out: How we'll feed ourselves in 2167 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
New food: Algae, fungus, insect protein

The carbon price and more expensive protein might hurt consumers’ bank accounts in the short term. In the longer term, however, these forces will create new market opportunities for low-energy food products. As a result, food scientists across Canada will explore low-energy protein supplies such as plants, fungi, algae and insects.

Although each of these sources of protein is relatively unknown to general consumers today, I expect an explosion of novel protein products to enter the market within a generation.

Initially, we will likely see plant-based proteins mixed with livestock proteins to reduce the overall carbon footprint of our diets. But as consumers become used to these new ingredients, they will became a regular part of the Canadian diet.

Edible insects, algae-based protein drinks and lab-grown “meat” will all become common. For example, “the Impossible Burger” that is made with no beef but tastes like a beef burger is making inroads into restaurants across North America.
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Will you be braving the unusual fare at Hawley Fayre this weekend?

Will you be braving the unusual fare at Hawley Fayre this weekend? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Ever wondered what eating a giant locust tastes like? What about a Mexican-spiced meal worm, or a flying termite?

Head to Hawley Fayre on Saturday (July 8) and you can find out courtesy of a creepy crawly pop-up restaurant, dubbed The Pestaurant.

Rentokil, which has its head office on the Riverbank Meadows Business Park in Blackwater, will be bringing its wares to Hawley Green with a free mini-bug buffet.

Hardy visitors will be able to try exotic treats including buffalo worms, locusts, BBQ bamboo worms, flying termites and even ‘Frankenstein Fudge’ – if they dare.

Entomophagy (the official word for insect-eating) has been growing in popularity in the UK thanks to television shows like I’m a Celebrity, Get Me Out of Here.
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Entomo Farms: 'We’re one of the most recognized [edible insect] brands across the world now'

Entomo Farms: 'We’re one of the most recognized [edible insect] brands across the world now' | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Canadian bug powder supplier Entomo Farms is still doing most of its business with snack food companies, but VP Darren Goldin – chatting with FoodNavigator-USA at the IFT show - envisions a future where frozen raw insects (as well as the roasted and milled variety) hit center stage.
To date said Goldin, most of the focus in North America has been on protein-rich powder (typically ground whole crickets) for use in nutrition bars and protein shakes. If bugs are going to truly become a viable alternative to meat as a protein source, however, they will need to find their way into a broader range of applications, he said.

"I’d like to see the raw product becoming available in a frozen format.

“The raw cricket has a very different taste and different functionality to a cricket that’s been roasted or roasted and ground into powder, the flavor profile is different and the way you can cook with it is different. Like any other meat I'd like to see this in the frozen food section like all of our proteins," said Goldin.

I see in the future you might have contract producers and centralized processing
Asked about the most efficient way to manufacture insect products at scale, Goldin said that at this stage of the industry’s evolution it made a lot of sense to be vertically integrated (Entomo Farms raises and processes its insects unlike some other players in the trade).

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Episode 12 -

Episode 12 - | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

By Ross

Today on The Ento Podcast we discuss the following news stories.

Join Me Today As We Go Through This Weeks News Stories…
•    Houston museum adds to gross income with insect vending machine
•    Eat the Beetles! explores the future of our grub
•    Why are Joseph Parker and Jerome Kaino eating bugs for lunch?
•    ‘I loved the taste instantly’: This woman adds insects to her meals
•    In Denver, a storage container houses the Rocky Mountain Micro Ranch
•    Award-winning chef serves creepy crawlies at Xochi in Houston
•    It’s a bug’s life in Gastonia this weekend

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Like Cockroaches, Bug People Will Not Be Stopped

Like Cockroaches, Bug People Will Not Be Stopped | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A new book explores the diversity of modern insects—and the strange people who insist on loving them.

Anybody living in a large city like New York exists in a constant state of bed bug fear. These beasts infest apartment complexes, infiltrate your furniture, and even hitch rides with you on the subway. Worse still, some bed bugs can survive months without feeding. Couple that with their rampant rate of reproduction and the frenetic lifestyle of the modern human, and the scourge of bed bugs isn't exactly likely to disappear in the near future.

But the human impact on how insects of all kinds proliferate is something many of us still don't want or care to reckon with. As with every kind of living thing on the planet, human activity can upend the natural order for insects, freeing them of natural predators and bolstering their spawn.

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Communiquer sur les bénéfices des protéines en 7 leçons - Nutrikéo

Communiquer sur les bénéfices des protéines en 7 leçons - Nutrikéo | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
3. Misez sur la source de protéines…

… plutôt que sur le nutriment lui-même. N’hésitez pas à vous positionner en tant qu’expert de la source de protéines utilisée dans vos produits. C’est le cas de la marque Insectes Comestibles qui se place en référent de l’entomophagie en France à travers son blog d’informations sur les insectes, leur production, leur histoire… Ils positionnent les produits dans un contexte exotique en suggérant des recettes traditionnelles de divers pays dont les insectes comestibles sont originaires. Flamant Vert, de son côté, se positionne en spécialiste des microalgues en créant un story-telling complet sur cette source exceptionnelle de protéines, et donne des informations détaillées sur la spiruline en proposant une immersion graphique dans les Andes sur son site web.
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July 1, 2017 - Edible Insects - DeGray Lake Resort - State Parks Event

July 1, 2017 - Edible Insects - DeGray Lake Resort - State Parks Event | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
July 1, 2017 @ 3 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Edible Insects DeGray Lake Resort State Park
57° (Bismarck, AR)
Admission: Free

Meeting Place: Amphitheater

In other parts of the world, eating insects is considered a delicacy! Today, a park interpreter will test your notion of who really eats bugs and who doesn’t. Are you brave enough to join the “I ate a bug club?" Take a bite, or at least watch!
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Edible Insects Market | Growth, Trends & Forecasts Research Report Till 2023

The report on global edible insects market evaluates the growth trends of the industry through historical study and estimates future prospects based on comprehensive research. The report extensively provides the market share, growth, trends and forecasts for the period 2016-2023. The market size in terms of revenue (USD MN) is calculated for the study period along with the details of the factors affecting the market growth (drivers and restraints).
 
Drivers

Rise in demand for nutrient rick foods
Increasing consumption of sustainable foods
 
Restraints
Lack of legal framework
Limited awareness
 
Furthermore, the report quantifies the market share held by the major players of the industry and provides an in-depth view of the competitive landscape. This market is classified into different segments with detailed analysis of each with respect to geography for the study period:
Base Year: 2016
Estimated Year: 2017
Forecast Till: 2023
 
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