Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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I Ate a Scorpion! - YouTube

\m/ (And roasted crickets). Edible bugs are a thing and if you're interested you can most likely find some place where you live where you can buy them/order ...

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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Diary of a Bugs Journey - Invenire Market Intelligence

Diary of a Bugs Journey - Invenire Market Intelligence | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Can edible bugs have a real impact? Insects need to become big. For our sake, and for our planet. Follow our journey to revolutionise food production
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Edible insects is just one dream. And just one journey.

Taking up the challenge to create a better future is not a simple journey. There are challenges, hurdles and tests of commitment.

But the journey is also one of growth, new skills and deeper understanding. The path contains new friends and partners with common visions. And the destination is a better world with your dream a reality.

 

Anyone can be a Leader. You just have to start your journey."

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Edible Insects StartUp Awarded USDA Innovation Grant - The Food Rush

Edible Insects StartUp Awarded USDA Innovation Grant - The Food Rush | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Bugeater Foods, a Nebraska based insect startup, has been awarded a Small Business Innovation Grant (SBIR) from the US Department of Agriculture. The startup will use the funding to conduct research on insect based foods, with a primary focus on extrusions such as rice, pasta and potentially other products.

The startup, formed by three University of Nebraska-Lincoln graduates back in 2015, aims to bring insect based food products to market. Their first product was a cricket powder protein shake, cleverly named Jump.
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VIDEO: Grubs up for real at ‘Pestaurant’ during national ploughing championships

VIDEO: Grubs up for real at ‘Pestaurant’ during national ploughing championships | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Diners at Rentokil’s pop-up Pestaurant will be spoiled for choice with an array of of creepy crawlies from an À la carte menu — all served free of charge.

The culinary delights include ham and cheese mealworms, chilli pepper crickets, ant chocolate rounds, roasted locusts, and grasshopper lolipops.

Managing Director of Rentokil Initial Ireland, Michael O’Mahoney, said Pestaurant is not only about enjoying a new culinary experience.
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Insects Could Be Your Next Diet Staple

Insects Could Be Your Next Diet Staple | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects are usually described as “gross,” “dirty,” “scary” or “disease carriers.” Among all the names people have given to them, “yummy” has never been a part of the vocabulary. However, this may no longer be the case.
You are not reading this wrong. Entomophagy, also known as bug-eating, has in fact become very popular in New York City. Chefs of the new generation dedicate their time to inventing thousands of insect-inspired dishes such as cricket flour cookies, grasshopper tacos, fried worms and rootworm beetle dip, to name a few.
Mario Hernandez, head chef of the Mexican restaurant The Black Ant, incorporates bugs into many of the dishes he creates.
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Should Insects Be Part of Your Healthy Diet?

Should Insects Be Part of Your Healthy Diet? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects can be pests and some can be beneficial to our ecosystem. But would you eat them? "Good Housekeeping" nutrition director Jackie London sheds light on Entomophagy, the practice of eating
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Bug Dinner at Grub Food Van

Bug Dinner at Grub Food Van | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Would you eat tempura-cricket san choy bao; black pudding with a mealworm crumb; and candied ants on blue-cheese parfait? At Grub Food Van's upcoming bug-inspired dinner, you can taste them all.

Drawing on themes from food films that are showcasing at Melbourne's Environmental Film Festival (such as Bugs on the Menu, Sustainable and Kubo’s Crickets), chef Ben Mac of The Social Food Project (he's previously worked at Supernormal and Top Paddock) will explore alternate and sustainable food options with his four-course menu. Each dish will be paired with a beverage.

Starts 6pm. Bookings essential.

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All Business with Jeffrey Hayzlett

All Business with Jeffrey Hayzlett | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

The Bug Bars... Pat Crowley says Eat Crickets!
37:40
From surf guide, to whitewater rafting guide, to hydrologist, to now insect-eating entrepreneur, Pat Crowley has always been driven by his passion to ensure a more sustainable water future. After a year of hitchhiking through Mexico and Central America, Pat Crowley returned to the US and received a M.S. in Watershed Hydrology, intending to use his education towards solving global water dilemmas he witnessed in his travels. His concern for our water future here at home increased as he observed the disproportionate rate of water consumption vs. availability. After some time working in public water planning agencies Pat decided to address the issue on a consumer level and co-founded Chapul, LLC in 2012. Today, Chapul is the maker of the award winning Original Cricket Bar and a successful gradate of the TV show, Shark Tank. He joins us today to discuss the importance of sustainable business.

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Ants take center stage at BugFest :: Out and About at WRAL.com

Ants take center stage at BugFest :: Out and About at WRAL.com | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The museum's annual celebration of bugs started 20 years ago when there was an American Indian exhibit there. Since the natives served insect cuisine, museum employees cooked them up. Over time, the event has evolved into a much larger event. 

Event coordinator Kari Wouk said entomophagy, or the practice of eating bugs, is natural to many cultures.

"There’s less environmental impact and it’s a healthier protein. So it doesn’t have the fat that most proteins do,” Wouk said. 

Local chefs will be serving up free bug cuisine on Saturday at the outdoor Cafe Insecta. Visitors can get some great non-bug cuisine from local food trucks and vendors, who will be on hand as well.

The event is more than just eating bugs. There will be more than 100 different exhibits, including cockroach racing, a Backyard Bee Keeping class and a children's parade. 
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Continuing to Aspire: Innovation & Strategic Choices Don’t Stop After the Start-up Stage

Continuing to Aspire: Innovation & Strategic Choices Don’t Stop After the Start-up Stage | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
This is a great example of how centering on your mission also enhances the resilience and power of your business model. If Aspire focused on cricket bars or crackers it would probably have to partner with a food processing facility. This, in turn, would make Aspire vulnerable to the fortunes and whims of that producer.
As with so many social entrepreneurs, Aspire Food Group is also very focused on scaling up production and working on bringing the cost down of production.
The other key component of Aspire Food Group’s social mission is empowering people to farm their own insects as a source of animal protein and as a potential income generating activity.  Here, their work with the palm weevil larvae in Ghana, West Africa, is producing some exciting results:
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Edible Insects Market Research Report Now Available at Research Corridor - The Republic of East Vancouver

Edible Insects Market Research Report Now Available at Research Corridor - The Republic of East Vancouver | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Research Corridor has published a new research study titled “Edible Insects Market – Growth, Share, Opportunities, Competitive Analysis and Forecast, 2015 – 2022”. The Edible Insects market report studies current as well as future aspects of the Edible Insects Market based upon factors such as market dynamics, key ongoing trends and segmentation analysis. Apart from the above elements, the Edible Insects Market research report provides a 360-degree view of the Edible Insects industry with geographic segmentation, statistical forecast and the competitive landscape.

Browse the complete report at http://www.researchcorridor.com/edible-insects-market/
Ana C. Day's insight:

Key Takeaways:

  • Market Dynamics in the Edible Insects Market
  • Key Ongoing Regional Trends
  • Edible Insects Market Estimates for Years 2013 – 2022
  • Edible Insects Market Positioning of Key Players
  • Key Strategies Adopted by the Leading Players
  • Attractive Investment Proposition
  • Edible Insects Market Inclination Insights
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The eco guide to grocery swaps

The eco guide to grocery swaps | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
he eco swap is the most bite-sized of all sustainable lifestyle actions. You simply replace items in your diet with those that have less impact, in terms of CO2 emissions, land use and change of land use – normally deforestation, and, critically, lower water consumption.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The UK has had to wait a while for a response to 2013’s UN report, Edible Insects: Future Prospects for Food and Feed Security, but now the Bug Boys have set up at FIELD in Brighton producing protein-rich cricket flour. Co-founder Daniel Stott used to raise crickets for his pet lizard, now he’s investigating their potential to feed the planet and hopes to infiltrate the British diet."

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Would you eat flapjacks made with crickets?

Eating bugs is becoming more and more popular so we thought we’d get in on the action.

According to a report by The Waste and Resources Action programme, finding a sustainable protein supply will be ‘one of the defining challenges of the coming decades’ and suggested that insects should become part of our diet.

So get used to it, bugs are the future.
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A guide to buying edible insects

A guide to buying edible insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Welcome to the exciting world of entomophagy! Below you will find a list of North American companies producing edible insects in various forms - from snack bites to protein powder to roasted whole. Start wherever you're comfortable.

Are you ready to eat some insects? The facts are out and it’s hard to argue with them – insects are the perfect answer to people’s desire for protein without the environmental costs that go along with animal agriculture. Raising insects for human consumption uses far less water, land, and food than livestock, and insects emit almost no greenhouse gases.

From the Entomo Farms website: “These insects contain 70% protein, more calcium than milk, more iron than spinach, and almost 20 times the amount of B12 as beef.”

The one major roadblock is getting over our North American squeamishness at the thought of eating crickets, mealworms, grasshoppers, buffalo worms, locusts, and the like. (Then come the Rhino beetles, black and yellow scorpions, and Queen Weaver ants!)
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Strong growth forecast for global edible insects market - Food In Canada

Strong growth forecast for global edible insects market - Food In Canada | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The global market for edible insects is expected to experience healthy growth between now and 2024, according to recent findings from Persistence Market Research (PMR), a New York-based market research company.

PMR’s report forecasts that the global edible insect market will increase to US$722.9 million by the end of 2024, up from US$423.8 million in 2016, with the expected CAGR (compound annual growth rate) for market expansion at around 6.1 per cent.

According to PMR, the lower production costs of insect-based products compared to chicken, beef, and pork will continue to be one of the key drivers pushing this market growth. The growing popularity of edible insect-based products as a substitute for egg and dairy proteins is also playing a key role in the rising demand, along with increasing awareness about the ecological upside of eating insects. There’s also less of a risk of food safety problems with edible insects (compared to some other proteins), which will help fuel the growth as well.

Growth is expected both in terms of edible insects as a whole (i.e. not ground up, etc.) and as an ingredient in other food products, with insects appearing as an ingredient in drinks, insect confectionery, snacks, baked products and more.
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SupermarketGuru - Arachnophobia Is Coming To Your Kitchen

SupermarketGuru - Arachnophobia Is Coming To Your Kitchen | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Learn how to shop for groceries smarter, eat healthier, and live better. With new food product video reviews, recipes, food allergy information, grocery coupons, tips and deals, Phil Lempert alerts customers and business leaders to impending corporate and consumer trends, and empowers them to make educated purchasing and marketing decisions.
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These grasshopper tacos are so good that eating them won’t feel like a dare

These grasshopper tacos are so good that eating them won’t feel like a dare | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The rendition at Lezo's Taqueria in Mt. Pleasant may even be better than the one at Oyamel.
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It's good that food economy has bugs in the system

It's good that food economy has bugs in the system | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
I ate a bug smoothie last month. On purpose.

At the first-ever Crain's Food Summit in Detroit's Eastern Market, we invited a handful of food entrepreneurs from around the state to "pitch" to potential investors.

One of them was Detroit Ento, which offers "sustainable protein" — aka bugs — that can be mixed with a number of things, from sauces to smoothies. Plus, they are "locally sourced." Yum! But consider it's two times the protein power of beef.

Actually, the smoothie was good. The bugs added a bit of texture. And they expanded my view of how Michigan can add some badly needed manufacturing and processing jobs to, dare I say, our economic food chain.
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Brisbane Program

Brisbane Program | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

BUGS ON THE MENU

Friday, October 14, 2016
6:15pm 8:30pm
New Farm Six Cinemas
DIR. IAN TOEWS | CANADA | 2016 | 78MINS

Bugs on the Menu asks us to reconsider the dietary choices that many of us take for granted every day by presenting a prescient and informative study of the health and environmental benefits of eating insects.

PANEL DISCUSSION: This screening includes a panel discussion. Panelists announced soon.

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A guide to eating insects in Mexico City - Out of the Blue

A guide to eating insects in Mexico City - Out of the Blue | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Five hundred years later, snacking on insects is coming back in style. Celebrated chefs like Pujol’s Enrique Olvera craft haute-cuisine based on heritage ingredients, and one restaurant,Los Danzantes, even throws a whole insect festival during “bug season” in June. Today, around 550 species of edible insects have been catalogued in Mexico. Here are a few of the most commonly served insect dishes and tips on where to find them in Mexico City.

Escamoles (ant larvae)
Escamoles, tender ant eggs that resemble small white beans and have a mildly nutty flavor, sell for upwards of 800 pesos per kilo at the gourmet Mercado San Juan, a must-see for any food lover visiting Mexico City. You can also sample this “Mexican caviar” in smaller doses at restaurants like Limosneros, which turns escamoles into an excellent appetizer with epazote, ayocote beans and cinnamon smoke. Escamol season starts in March and peaks around Easter.
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Grasshoppers - the new sushi? - BBC News

Grasshoppers - the new sushi? - BBC News | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Tucked away in a warehouse on an industrial estate in the non-descript suburb of Van Nuys in Los Angeles, a revolution is taking place. And the revolutionaries? Five twentysomething college friends who are trying their hand at urban farming.
Their business is called Coalo Valley Farms but it couldn't be any further from a picture of agrarian life. The warehouse holds thousands of "micro livestock" as co-founder and chief executive Elliot Mermel calls them. That's crickets and mealworms to you and me.
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Exclusive Speaker Interview with Virpi Varjonen, Strategist at Invenire Strategic Marketing

Exclusive Speaker Interview with Virpi Varjonen, Strategist at Invenire Strategic Marketing | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Q: What kinds of companies are currently making 'insect products'?
A: So far, it’s committed entrepreneurs who are making inroads with insect products, with snack bars the biggest product type. These types of products generally use insect flours rather than whole insects - making them easier for consumers to try and experiment with.

Q: What are your predictions for the F&B industry over the next 3-5 years? 
A: Sustainability to become more integrated right across the food chain. I expect we’ll see more companies evaluating and rethinking their current business models. As a result, we’ll see greater respect for raw materials and shorter, more transparent value chains emerging.

Q: What presentations are you looking forward to attending at the Hi Europe conference this year?
A: I’ll surely attend Module 3B: Creating a sustainable long-term business strategy'. This topic is close to my heart, as well as to our work at Invenire. I look forward discussions and debates about how we could accelerate actions towards more sustainable business for the future.
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Episode 58 | Bugs in Food: How a Crazy Idea Becomes an Awesome Reality, with Bitty Foods CEO Megan Miller

Episode 58 | Bugs in Food: How a Crazy Idea Becomes an Awesome Reality, with Bitty Foods CEO Megan Miller | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Megan Miller wants to know… why aren’t you eating bugs yet??

And for good reason – evidence suggests that protein sourced from insects just might be the key to fixing the world’s global food system.

Luckily for all of us, the bugs in question come in the form of delicious BittyFoods snacks, which include chocolate chip cookies and Chiridos, their signature tortilla-style chips.

Megan Miller is a digital strategist turned food pioneer, and the co-founder of BittyFoods, a company that makes a bevy of snacks made with their signature high-protein cricket flour.

The environmental science behind cricket farming is fascinating, but what we loved about our conversation with Megan was hearing how her vision and fearlessness empowered her to create something, well… a bit crazy.
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Penn State’s Great Insect Fair creates insect-incorporated snacks

Penn State’s Great Insect Fair creates insect-incorporated snacks | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Chocolate bark with a cricket drizzle and cricket flour chocolate chip cookies were just some of the unique snacks fairgoers at the "Insect Deli" feasted on.

On Saturday, Penn State's Department of Entomology and the College of Agricultural Sciences hosted their annual Great Insect Fair at the Snider Agricultural Arena. This year's fair was mainly focused on entomophagy — the human practice of eating insects.

"[The insect deli] is used to introduce people to eating insects,” Head Librarian of Life Science Library Amy Paster said. “In North America, people generally do not eat insects, even though it's an excellent protein source and is a lot easier on the environment."
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Why cricket flour is the new 'it' ingredient - Sporteluxe

Why cricket flour is the new 'it' ingredient - Sporteluxe | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
If the thought of biting into a crunchy mix of crickets doesn’t sound appealing, you needn’t worry. Exo protein bars come in five flavours – cocoa nut, blueberry vanilla, peanut butter & jelly, apple cinnamon, and banana bread. Born from a desire to create something that was nutritionally beneficial and tasted great, the inclusion of crickets in the recipe provided an environmentally friendly and sustainable way of producing something new and delicious for a competetive market.

Nutritional benefits

Despite a cultural fear of eating insects in the West, 80% of the world consumes them on a regular basis. Exo protein bars aim to combine the sustainability of insects as food, with the flavour that shouldn’t have to be sacrificed for healthy food. Exo protein bars are all natural, dairy-free, gluten-free, paleo-friendly, soy-free, and offer 10 grams of protein in each bar. Cricket flour is 65% protein, and crickets themselves contain all of the essential amino acids and more than twice as much iron as spinach.
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Rentokil revives edible insect pop-up

Rentokil revives edible insect pop-up | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The pop-up restaurant will be making an appearance at the inaugural New Scientist Live event, taking place at Excel London from 22-35 September and also at Science Museum Lates on 28 September. 

On the first day of the event, the pestaurant will be cooking one of three dishes previously chosen by the public. This will be either a Black Forest Floor Brownie, using mealworms for batter, Cricket & Peanut Brittle Chocolate Cupcakes or an Early Bird Breakfast Pie, featuring bamboo worms. 

There will also be a mini-bug buffet with a range of insects for visitors to try, including salt-and-vinegar crickets, Mexican spice mealworms, cheddar cheese mealworms, plain roasted locusts and buffalo worms. Rentokil experts will also be on hand to discuss why insects can provide a viable and sustainable food source, and to answer any pest-related questions.
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Eating crickets gives you more iron, protein elements

Eating crickets gives you more iron, protein elements | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The mention of the name cricket sends a notion of a tiny insect which turns out to be a complete nuisance during the night.

Its incessant noise in the night has made scores question why it is in existence in the first place.

But it turns out the tiny insect is a nutritional dish being popularised within Kenyan communities.

At the Jomo Kenyatta university of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT) main campus in Juja crickets are being reared for purposes of consumption both for human beings and also livestock.

A nutritionist, John Kinyuru makes a clarion call to Kenyans to change their eating habits suggesting change of diet through embrace of cricket eating.

Kinyuru notes crickets are a rich source of nutrition with high levels of protein not contained in conventional meat products.
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