Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Les ténébrions et leurs larves : allergènes alimentaires du futur ?

Tenebrio Spp. and their mealworms: Food allergy of the futureG. Dutau Revue Française d'Allergologie

Volume 54, Issue 1, January 2014, Pages 1–3


Via Jacques Mignon
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Jacques Mignon's curator insight, April 4, 2014 7:49 AM

Début du texte de l'Editorial :

"Dans le présent numéro, Van der Brempt et Moneret-Vautrin et al.attirent notre attention sur le « Risque allergique de Tenebrio molitor pour la consommation humaine ». En effet, la proposition de « nouveaux aliments » comme les insectes ou leurs larves n’est pas sans poser non seulement des problèmes d’acceptabilité liés aux habitudes culturelles alimentaires, mais aussi des questions sanitaires, en particulier allergiques. Prenant l’exemple des vers de farine, larves de T. molitor, les auteurs soulignent à juste titre l’importance d’études préalables sur le risque allergique de ces protéines même si, à leur connaissance, un seul cas d’anaphylaxie a été décrit, ce qui est peut-être très en dessous de la réalité, car l’analyse de la littérature est toujours limitée aux publications effectuées et aux allergènes reconnus. Or les allergènes des insectes sont très souvent des allergènes masqués."

Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Why insect can save the world. Call for support to 2018 Global insect conference in China Shenzhen

Published on Sep 29, 2016
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The 17 superfoods that are set to be 2017’s hottest food trends

The 17 superfoods that are set to be 2017’s hottest food trends | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Edible insects, animal organs and bacon-flavoured red algae are just some of the superfoods set to become huge health food trends this year, according to experts.

A total of 17 foods will feature increasingly on menus and appear on supermarket shelves more and more, say insiders - ranging from the exotic kakadu plum to goat meat.

From healthy alternatives to sugar and chocolate to super fruits and nutritious substitutes for pasta, these are the foods to eat if you want your new year's healthy resolution to last more than a month.
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Koppert Cress serves buffalo’s in recently opened Fair Food restaurant | Proti-Farm

Koppert Cress serves buffalo’s in recently opened Fair Food restaurant | Proti-Farm | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Monster, The Netherlands – Koppert Cress recently opened their new Rob & Bob Fair Food restaurant with daily  healthy meals for their own employees which can be enriched by buffalo’s from Proti-Farm, a source of healthy, natural proteins.

Koppert Cress’ mission is to provide its employees with healthy and natural meals by always looking for new and innovative ingredients. In order to keep improving the quality of their meals they have been focused on lowering sugar (50%) in the last three years and using all kind of natural ingredients.

Today Proti-Farm’s CEO visited their site and was impressed with the initiative. Thank you to the team of  Koppert Cress for this healthy choice!

More to come soon.
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Xochi Will Bring Oaxacan Dishes and Edible Insects to Houston in January

Xochi Will Bring Oaxacan Dishes and Edible Insects to Houston in January | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Dynamic duo chef Hugo Ortega and Tracy Vaught have finally revealed new details about their forthcoming restaurant, Xochi. On Thursday, the H Town Restaurant Group confirmed that the full-service eatery headed for Marriott Marquis Houston Downtown hotel will debut in next month with an Oaxacan-inspired menu.

“Oaxaca is so rich with culinary diversity and traditions and is a place I never tire of visiting,” chef Ortega says in a statement. “Its large size and numerous geographic regions hold endless interest for me as a chef and as a Mexican native.”
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Bugs On the Menu on iTunes

Bugs On the Menu on iTunes | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

About the Movie
The sound of crickets isn’t always a good thing, but to the entrepreneurs of Entomo Farms, it’s the sound of their rapidly growing business. The Goldin brothers raise cricket protein for human consumption, and they’ve seen their farm grow tenfold in 24 months. The surge of interest has been sparked by a 200 page UN report outlining the health and environmental benefits of insect protein -- that has been downloaded 7 million times. While an estimated 2 billion people eat bugs worldwide, it’s still not an accepted food in the west. With the population projected to surpass 9 billion by 2050, the time to consider alternate proteins is now.
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Kauai entrepreneurs use crickets to promote healthy eating

Kauai entrepreneurs use crickets to promote healthy eating | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
LIHUE, Hawaii (AP) - Two entrepreneurs are working to open an eatery on Kauai that offers customers healthy food options, with a focus on crickets as a main protein source.

The Garden Island reports that Lourdes Torres and Emilio Ruiz-Romero have been raising crickets to prepare to open their Lihue business in January.

They keep the insects in large bins at Torres' Kilauea home and once they've lived out their six-week life cycle, the crickets are frozen, dehydrated and ground into powder.

The powder will be available as an option for customers to add into fruit smoothies or baked goods, such as chocolate chip cookies.

Torres says their focus has been on ensuring all their food is farmed sustainably.
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AFFIA has its (italian) President - Entomofago

AFFIA has its (italian) President - Entomofago | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
ou were recently elected as AFFIA President. What are your priorities?
There is a lot of work to be done. It is a new industry, and there is the need for recognition from government agencies (FDA, customs, Health Departments, Governments). Standards like the cricket farming GAP (Good Agricultural Practices) needs to be developed (in Thailand, the ACFS agency is taking care of it) to ensure global commerce and total food safety.
We also want to support knowledge sharing. There is no literature on insect farming, and bug flour processing did not exist before 2010. Everything is so new, and many existing and new players want to know how to do things.
Whenever it is compatible with industrial intellectual property protection, we want to spread practical and theoretical information.
Last but not least, we will call for more companies and organizations to join us. Most of the market is made up of very small companies, with limited resources. The AFFIA membership fee is less than 50 USD, allowing everyone access to the association and its benefits.

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Westporter fights chronic malnutrition in Guatemala with edible insects

Westporter fights chronic malnutrition in Guatemala with edible insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
At the end of her hour-long trek up a steep hill and through the fields, Westport native Gabby Wimer is met by grateful residents in the rural Guatemalan village of Candelaria.
What motivated the recent college grad? The thought of teaching the villagers how to sustainably farm protein-rich insects.
Wimer, along with Joyce Lu and Elizabeth Frank, the co-founders of MealFlour, has been working to reduce chronic malnutrition in Guatemala, a country with the fourth-highest rate in the world. Based in Quetzaltenango, the second largest Guatemalan city, MealFlour promotes better nutrition by providing instruction on how to set up and maintain farms of mealworms, the edible larval form of a beetle.
Although still in early stages, the enterprise has received favorable reactions from families, including the children.
“Their kids come up during the home visits and are telling us about the mealworm farm and are super excited about it,” Wimer said. “They want to help out with it, too.”
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Should replacing meat with insects be your New Year’s resolution?

Should replacing meat with insects be your New Year’s resolution? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Why we invested in Ynsect
Today, Ynsect, the first bio-refinery of insects in the world, announced its $15.3m series B, bringing the company’s total funding to $37.7m. Future Positive Capital (my new investment firm) co-led the round, alongside Bpifrance Ecotechnologies, Quadia SA and the previous investors also chipped in, including Emertec, Demeter and New Protein Capital.
I personally joined the board as Director. Since this is our first public investment and given the growing interest in the alternative protein space, I wanted to take a moment to share why we invested.
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Cochineal Bugs Create Red Dye: A Moment in Science

Award-winning Museum educator Bob Alderink reveals the secret ingredient that gives your strawberry yogurt (and many other foods) a pleasing rosy hue.
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Cheryl Preyer's curator insight, December 15, 2016 11:17 AM
Naturally cool!  Red food from cochineal bugs.
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Eat the Beetles!: An Exploration into Our Conflicted Relationship with Insects

Eat the Beetles!: An Exploration into Our Conflicted Relationship with Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Will eating insects change the world for the better?​

Meet the beetles: there are millions and millions of them and many fewer of the rest of us — mammals, birds, and reptiles. Since before recorded history, humans have eaten insects. While many get squeamish at the idea, entomophagy — people eating insects — is a possible way to ensure a sustainable and secure food supply for the eight billion of us on the planet.

Once seen as the great enemy of human civilization, destroying our crops and spreading plagues, we now see insects as marvellous pollinators of our food crops and a potential source of commercial food supply. From upscale restaurants where black ants garnish raw salmon to grubs as pub snacks in Paris and Tokyo, from backyard cricket farming to high-tech businesses, Eat the Beetles! weaves these cultural, ecological, and evolutionary narratives to provide an accessible and humorous exploration of entomophagy.
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Bugs inspire new products by students

Bugs inspire new products by students | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Insect-derived protein was a key ingredient in the new products developed by final year Diploma of Food Science and Technology students at the William Angliss Institute in Melbourne for their end-of-year showcase.

Bugs on the menu at William Angliss Institute product showcase

Ana C. Day's insight:

The winner and runner-up of the 2016 Australian Institute of Food Science and Technology award for product most likely to succeed in the marketplace both used insect-derived proteins in their winning products.

Joshua Drury won with his product Critter Fritters, Mexican-style sweet corn cricket fritters.

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Alt-protein: Movement answers the call for more protein choice

Alt-protein: Movement answers the call for more protein choice | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
With worldwide demand for protein set to reach new heights, what protein alternatives are robust and innovative enough to satisfy consumer appetite?  
The large protein contingent at FoodMattersLive was a strong indication that introducing novel and more sustainable sources to the sector offered immense opportunities for suppliers and food makers.

Despite EU hesitancy insect protein continues to make headway in the European market buoyed on by good quality products that look to overcome the so-called ‘yuck factor’ sooner rather than later.

“It’s surprising how quickly the perception is changing as the food industry more normalises the use of crickets in their food," the company’s founder, Tony Askins, said.

“Here at FoodMattersLive there are twelve companies showcasing their insect-derived products. Last year there were only two.”

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One of Europe's largest supermarkets will sell burgers and meatballs made from mealworms

One of Europe's largest supermarkets will sell burgers and meatballs made from mealworms | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Beef might taste delicious, but producing it exhausts our planet's land and water. As a result, more chefs and retailers are searching for alternatives that taste like beef — including insects.

Starting May 2017, Coop, one of Switzerland's largest wholesale retailers, will start selling "burgers" and "meatballs" — both primarily made from mealworm larvae — at select grocery locations. It will partner with Essento, a Swiss startup that makes food from insects, Switzerland's the Local reports.

Coop plans to eventually offer more insect products beyond burgers and meatballs, Essento co-founder Christian Bärtsch tells Business Insider. He declined to specify what they will be and how many Coop locations will carry Essento's products.


Essento's meatballs, made from mealworm larvae, that will be sold at select Coop locations in Switzerland. Essento
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Bug Binge: Finns Most Eager to Feast on Protein-Rich Creepy-Crawlies

Bug Binge: Finns Most Eager to Feast on Protein-Rich Creepy-Crawlies | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

"With the prospect of switching to insect-based foods being proposed as a way of dodging a global food crisis, Finland seems to be among the most promising markets, since many Finns have been found to be eager to change their diet, provided that the new insect-based products are available at shops.

Living on Locusts and Wild Honey: Swedes to Enjoy a Diet of Insects and Algae
A surprising 70 percent of Finnish respondents are interested in insects as a foodstuff, whereas about 50 percent would gladly buy insect-based food if it were available in stores, a new survey conducted by the University of Turku and the Natural Resources Institute (Luke) revealed. Surprisingly, many Finns talked about eating insects from personal experience, as a third of respondents claimed to have previously tried eating bugs beforehand, Finnish national broadcaster Yle reported."

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Swiss get go-ahead to feast on creepy-crawlies - SWI swissinfo.ch

Swiss get go-ahead to feast on creepy-crawlies - SWI swissinfo.ch | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
From next spring Swiss foodies will be able to buy insects such as mealworms, crickets and locusts for consumption, after approval from the government. The Coop supermarket announced on Friday that it plans to start selling insect burgers soon.
The new revised food laws, which bring Switzerland into line with the European Union, will come into effect on May 1, 2017, the cabinet decided on Friday.
From that date, all foodstuffs can be sold in Switzerland, as long as they are judged to be safe and respect legal regulations. Up to present, foodstuffs which were not specifically mentioned in Swiss law were banned. Mealworms, crickets and locusts, for example, could only be sold as pet food.
From May next year insects can be sold legally throughout Switzerland. They will, however, be subject to an authorization to ensure their safety, the government said.
Following the government’s message, the Coop supermarket chain announced that it had been working with the start-up firm Essento to develop insect-based products and would start selling insect burgers and meat balls from next spring.
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Close encounters of the insects | News, Sports, Jobs - The Express

Close encounters of the insects | News, Sports, Jobs - The Express | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
But there is a move afoot to increase our dietary intake of insects. A few years back, the United Nations put out a report entitled “Edible Insects: Future Prospects for Food and Feed Security” as a way to provide nutrients for a growing world population. While we may find eating insects distasteful, certain cultures obtain protein and nutrients through a steady diet of insects.

Closer to home, a Penn State student recently explored the use of crickets (ground up as a substitute for flour) as an ingredient for baking.

Next time you throw snow peas, broccoli and eggplant into your stir fry, remember that you are getting some protein from the hiding insects.
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Lab-Grown Meat? Tyson Foods Launches $150 Million Venture Capital Fund For Startups To Focus On Meatless Future

Lab-Grown Meat? Tyson Foods Launches $150 Million Venture Capital Fund For Startups To Focus On Meatless Future | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
New Sources Of Proteins, Less Waste And Empowerment For The Consumers
First, the fund is interested in innovative companies that work on finding alternative sources of proteins for humans, which will provide healthy, humane and delicious choices for consumers. Such creative solutions may include vegetarian alternatives, lab-grown meat or even insect-based products. This does not mean, however, that Tyson Foods' best-known brands will be replaced by the innovations.
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Study suggests Finnish residents are open to eating insects

Study suggests Finnish residents are open to eating insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
People in Finland seem especially keen on finding out about and trying edible insects or insect-based foods.

Some 70 percent of 585 respondents to a new study conducted by the University of Turku and the Natural Resources Institute said they are interested in insects as a foodstuff.

About 50 percent said they would gladly buy insect-based food if it were made available in stores. A third said they had already tried eating them in some form.

Keener than in other countries

The survey is part of a Insects in the food chain-project sponsored by the Finnish tech funding agency Tekes. The project gauged Finnish attitudes towards eating insects and compared these results with similar statistics in Sweden, Germany and the Czech Republic.

A Turku University release says Finnish residents were more open to the idea of eating insects than those from the other countries.

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Does the Best Marijuana Come From a Bug’s Behind?

Does the Best Marijuana Come From a Bug’s Behind? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Another industry that is still taking baby steps is of course cannabis, and Goldin was quick to praise the correlation of the two sectors growing together symbiotically. “There are large amounts of [frass]available now and people are starting to understand it better.”

Goldin revealed that his operation has been visited by at least “two or three” of Canada’s Licensed Producers who are now conducting grow trials with frass. “One of our investors has got some connections to some of the medical producers, and we asked if he could mention [frass]to them. He did, and all of them got very excited.” Goldin went on to add that the cannabis growers were already familiar with the fertilizer and eager to do tests.

Some of the anecdotal evidence that has been found about frass is very promising. Not only does it have significant levels of what fertilizer needs — high compounds of nitrogen, potassium and phosphorous — but insect frass has something other fertilizers don’t.
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Global Edible Insects market forecasts (2016-2021) with industry chain structure, competitive landscape, new projects and investment analysis.

Global Edible Insects market forecasts (2016-2021) with industry chain structure, competitive landscape, new projects and investment analysis. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The Edible Insects market provides detailed market segment level data on International as well as regional market and in-depth analysis on different market segments.

A strong trend of R&D investments in Food & Beverage industries will majorly drive this industry. Other growth drivers include the need to curtail costs, growth and increased use of shifting commodity prices, strength of private label brands and increased competition from players in Edible Insects market.

Browse Detailed TOC, Tables, Figures, Charts and Companies Mentioned in Edible Insects Market Research Report@ http://www.360marketupdates.com/10396127

Edible Insects Market in World, presents critical information and factual data about this Industry, with an overall statistical study of this market on the basis of market drivers, market limitations, and its future prospects. The widespread trends and opportunities are also taken into consideration in Edible Insects Market study.
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The Futuristic Utensils Designed to Help You Eat Bugs

The Futuristic Utensils Designed to Help You Eat Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
By now, you’ve probably heard that eating bugs is in your future. Insects are protein-rich and efficient to farm, and the UN has predicted we’ll largely be surviving off of beetle bites and caterpillar consommé by 2050. Chefs are already whipping up recipes for curried grasshoppers, buffalo worm nuggets, and chocolate mealworm spread—although, of course, the easiest way of tucking in to these delicacies is just eating the insects whole. So what’s stopping you?

Maybe your tongue has a few questions. But if it’s merely the lack of an appropriate utensil that is holding you back, designer Wataru Kobayashi has you covered. In his new project, BUGBUG, Kobayashi introduces a set of cutlery that’ll have you gleefully crunching exoskeletons, scooping scorpions, and sinking your teeth into a different style of wing.
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The Buggin' Out with ChefPV School Tour -- USA

The Buggin' Out with ChefPV School Tour -- USA | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Who is ChefPV?
Culinary thought leader Don Peavy—also known professionally as “ChefPV”—is transforming what we eat and what we think about what we eat.  His is a platform of sustainability, Entomophagy (the consumption of insects), and social and political awareness.  As a full-spectrum chef, and progressive voice in the food industry, Peavy is making profound change more digestible and delicious for everyone.

Why Entomophagy?
Don Peavy first learned about Entomophagy near the end of 2014 when his pal GOOGLE showed him the United Nations FAO-sanctioned report Edible insects: Future prospects for food and feed security.  This 201-page document paints a bleak picture of how strained global food systems are:

Trends towards 2050 predict a steady population increase to 9 billion people, forcing an increased food/feed output from available agro-ecosystems resulting in an even greater pressure on the environment. Scarcities of agricultural land, water, forest, fishery and biodiversity resources, as well as nutrients and non-renewable energy are foreseen.

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Insects as Food and Feed: Feedback on the short course, an initiative to replicate! | AFFIA

Insects as Food and Feed: Feedback on the short course, an initiative to replicate! | AFFIA | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
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Blue Delliquanti: Web Comics, Graphic Novels & Edible Insects - HOW Design

Blue Delliquanti: Web Comics, Graphic Novels & Edible Insects - HOW Design | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
“Which do you want to taste first—the mealworm or the cricket?”

Those were Blue Delliquanti’s first words to me as she held out a tray piled high with chocolate-coated insects. Blue and I met up while she was an artist in residence with the Serenbe Institute near Atlanta, where she spent time working on a graphic novel about, yep, eating bugs.

Blue is a Minneapolis-based designer, artist and illustrator. She’s the creator of the webcomic O Human Star, a science-fiction family drama. Meal, her soon-to-be-released graphic novel, stars a chef on a quest to persuade people—including her girlfriend—to eat a wide variety of insects.

So after munching on a few bugs, Blue and I sat down to talk about her creative process and her book:

Blue, how did you get introduced to insect cuisine?

I graduated from Franklin College Switzerland in 2011, and during my time there I traveled quite a bit. While visiting Thailand, I was invited to help prepare a special dinner of fried crickets. We collected them in fields on the outskirts of town using a solar-powered light. It was a fun, mass-participation event, and the resulting meal was delicious. I never forgot it.
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