Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
171.9K views | +39 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Ana C. Day
onto Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Scoop.it!

Grasshopper — it’s what’s for dinner | Food & Drink | The News Tribune

Grasshopper — it’s what’s for dinner | Food & Drink | The News Tribune | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
When Seattle’s David George Gordon has his ants over for dinner, he’s not having a family reunion.
more...
No comment yet.
Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Why insect can save the world. Call for support to 2018 Global insect conference in China Shenzhen

Published on Sep 29, 2016
insect as food, insect as feed,eating insects, raising insects as food, raising insects, insects will save the world, insect protein, insect streetfood,Insect ,entomology ,entomophagy hunger food feed renewable energy pest control organic fertilizer soil conditioning soil rejuvenation tackle poverty malnutrition medicine medical healthcare new materials food waste treatment SHRILK chitin protein amino acids energy bar,YCERA, supercast, superworm, zophobas morio, black soldier fly, pest control, Koppert, Ynsect , kenchong, insect save the world, china, Shenzhen, 2018 insect conference
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Insect innovation: Getting the right flavour and texture for your product

Insect innovation: Getting the right flavour and texture for your product | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
As Switzerland prepares to legalise three insect species for food, we talk to one Finnish researcher on the best ways to process mealworms and crickets to get the optimal flavour and texture profile.
Insects are still awaiting novel food authorisation in the EU although this has not hampered innovation with a number of European companies already up and running and profiting from a legal grey area in certain cases. 

The overall attitude seems to be that while it's not an easy regulatory environment to navigate, this trend is about to explode and entrepreneurs don’t want to miss out - even if the novel food deadlock means that bricks and mortar retail channels are closed with sales instead coming from online shoppers.

One door in Europe is about to open, however.

On 1 May this year Switzerland is will legalise three species of insects for food, allowing mealworm larvae (Tenebrio molitor), adult house crickets (Acheta domesticus) and adult migratory locusts (Locusta migratoria) to be sold both whole and in pieces.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

VTT develops raw materials for meatballs and falafel from mealworms and crickets

VTT develops raw materials for meatballs and falafel from mealworms and crickets | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed food ingredients from mealworms and crickets which, due to their promising structure and flavour, have the potential to be used in the manufacture of foods such as meatballs and falafel. EU legislation will change in the coming years, and the farming of insects and their processing for consumption will become a business activity also in Europe.   

Mealworms and crickets are the most widely farmed insects in Western countries. A dry fractionation method developed by VTT can be used to easily produce insect fractions with varying flavours and degrees of coarseness: fine fractions contain small amounts of the insect chitin shell which tends to feel rough on the tongue and have a strong meat-like taste, while coarse fractions are milder in flavour and contain more chitin.  

Fat was removed from the insects prior to fractionation, due to which the insect fractions contained up to 65–80% crude protein.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

The demand for grilling is also present in the Limmattal

The demand for grilling is also present in the Limmattal | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
What is every day in Asia on the menu, could end up on the plates soon with us. The new Food Act, which will come into force in May, allowed shops and restaurants to offer insects. Are permitted for the time being three types: locusts, house crickets and mealworms.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Insects could be in May on the shelf. As the request from the Asia Store in Dietikon shows are in Limmattal already a small demand for insects: "We had to put off customers because of the sale of insect is not allowed," says Leng Seav Taing, co-owner of Asia Store. He can therefore well imagine, take insect in its range. At the same time he remains skeptical that the demand will increase massively. "It's more for the interested customers an experiment to eat insects," says Taing."

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Fish and chirps? Some see bugs as the next big thing in food

Fish and chirps? Some see bugs as the next big thing in food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
WILLISTON, Vt. — At Tomorrow’s Harvest farm, you won’t find acres of land on which animals graze, or rows of corn, or bales of hay. Just stacks of boxes in a basement and the summery song of thousands of chirping crickets.

It’s one of a growing number of operations raising crickets for human consumption that these farmers say is more ecologically sound than meat but acknowledge is sure to bug some people out.

Once consumers get beyond the ick factor, they say, there are a lot of benefits to consuming bugs.

“We don’t need everybody to eat insects,” said Robert Nathan Allen, founder and director of Little Herds, an educational nonprofit in Austin, Texas, that promotes the use of insects for human food and animal feed. “The point we really like to highlight with the education is that if only a small percent of people add this to their diet, there’s a huge environmental impact.”

Cricket fans say if only 1 percent of the U.S. population substituted even just 1 percent of their meat consumption with insects, millions of gallons of water in drinking and irrigation would be saved, along with thousands of metric tons of greenhouse-gas emissions from machinery and animals.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Is the EU planning to feed its growing population on INSECTS?

Is the EU planning to feed its growing population on INSECTS? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In a written question she said: “Opinions in favour of the use of insects for food have been issued by the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) in 2013, and subsequently in France by the National Food Safety Agency (ANSES) on 12 February 2015.

“The nutritional value of insects is similar to that of meat products. However, it is more economical to produce insects because only 2 kg of feed is needed to produce 1 kg of insects, while it takes 8 kg of feed to produce 1 kg of beef.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Insect farming in the UK - workshop

Insect farming in the UK - workshop | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
DESCRIPTION
The use of insect derived products is growing globally. In the UK, insect for human consumption are already being sold in restaurants, on shop shelves, and online, mainly using imported insect produce. Crickets and mealworms are being grown and sold as food for exotic pets. There is increasing interest in using insects in aquaculture and animal feeds, as well as a source of non-food products, such as biodiesel.
The UK has a world renowned reputation in agricultural innovation, based on long-established farming industries. UK farming includes aquaculture, livestock, arable, and horticultural production, and insect farming could become another aspect of the UK agricultural industry.
This workshop, organised by ADAS with support from the British Ecological Society, the Royal Entomological Society, and the Woven Network will bring together key scientists, industry representatives, policy makers and early innovators from across the UK. Our objectives are to:
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

New on the menu: the Mini-Livestock Revolution – Where Next Happens

New on the menu: the Mini-Livestock Revolution – Where Next Happens | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
OCE Supports the Future of Protein

Bugs. You’ve eaten your share without even knowing. For some, it’s a concept that causes their skin to crawl. Most of us flail wildly trying to get an ant out of our hair, or a spider off the window ledge. Overreactions by some to the mere proximity to insects aside, entomophagy, or the practice of eating insects, is far more common that you might think. In fact, you’ve undoubtedly eaten them while peddling around the park on your trusty one-speed, when they’ve land unnoticed on your pizza or even when knocking back the black fly in your Chardonnay that Alanis warned us about so many years ago.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Buggin: In the Kitchen with Insect Snack Entrepreneur Robyn Shapiro - Garden Collage

Buggin: In the Kitchen with Insect Snack Entrepreneur Robyn Shapiro - Garden Collage | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Are crickets kosher? Were my childhood M&Ms laced with ground up insects? Should my kitchen cabinets be stocked with freeze-dried creepy crawlers? These were some of the questions plaguing me after a few hours with Seek Food founder Robyn Shapiro.

On a mild-Fall Saturday afternoon, we met at her East Village apartment. Shapiro was workshopping new recipes for her cricket-laden line of Snack Bites. For me, photographing insects as food seemed more a voyeuristic endeavor than a participatory one, until the cookie dough-like mixture was within reach. Eyeing cashews, coconut flakes, almonds and figs, while ignoring a gaping four-pound bag of cricket flour, I popped a marble-size ball in my mouth.

Researchers have long eyed crickets and other insects as an efficient opportunity to bridge the nutrition gap between rich and poor countries. News stories abound with beetles, dragonfly larvae, and water bugs as the meat of the future. But for Shapiro, the future is now.

Here are highlights from Shapiro’s enthusiastic introduction to her craft.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

One of Europe's largest supermarkets will sell burgers and meatballs made from mealworms

One of Europe's largest supermarkets will sell burgers and meatballs made from mealworms | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Beef might taste delicious, but producing it exhausts our planet's land and water. As a result, more chefs and retailers are searching for alternatives that taste like beef — including insects.

Starting May 2017, Coop, one of Switzerland's largest wholesale retailers, will start selling "burgers" and "meatballs" — both primarily made from mealworm larvae — at select grocery locations. It will partner with Essento, a Swiss startup that makes food from insects, Switzerland's the Local reports.

Coop plans to eventually offer more insect products beyond burgers and meatballs, Essento co-founder Christian Bärtsch tells Business Insider. He declined to specify what they will be and how many Coop locations will carry Essento's products.


Essento's meatballs, made from mealworm larvae, that will be sold at select Coop locations in Switzerland. Essento
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Bug Binge: Finns Most Eager to Feast on Protein-Rich Creepy-Crawlies

Bug Binge: Finns Most Eager to Feast on Protein-Rich Creepy-Crawlies | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

"With the prospect of switching to insect-based foods being proposed as a way of dodging a global food crisis, Finland seems to be among the most promising markets, since many Finns have been found to be eager to change their diet, provided that the new insect-based products are available at shops.

Living on Locusts and Wild Honey: Swedes to Enjoy a Diet of Insects and Algae
A surprising 70 percent of Finnish respondents are interested in insects as a foodstuff, whereas about 50 percent would gladly buy insect-based food if it were available in stores, a new survey conducted by the University of Turku and the Natural Resources Institute (Luke) revealed. Surprisingly, many Finns talked about eating insects from personal experience, as a third of respondents claimed to have previously tried eating bugs beforehand, Finnish national broadcaster Yle reported."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Swiss get go-ahead to feast on creepy-crawlies - SWI swissinfo.ch

Swiss get go-ahead to feast on creepy-crawlies - SWI swissinfo.ch | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
From next spring Swiss foodies will be able to buy insects such as mealworms, crickets and locusts for consumption, after approval from the government. The Coop supermarket announced on Friday that it plans to start selling insect burgers soon.
The new revised food laws, which bring Switzerland into line with the European Union, will come into effect on May 1, 2017, the cabinet decided on Friday.
From that date, all foodstuffs can be sold in Switzerland, as long as they are judged to be safe and respect legal regulations. Up to present, foodstuffs which were not specifically mentioned in Swiss law were banned. Mealworms, crickets and locusts, for example, could only be sold as pet food.
From May next year insects can be sold legally throughout Switzerland. They will, however, be subject to an authorization to ensure their safety, the government said.
Following the government’s message, the Coop supermarket chain announced that it had been working with the start-up firm Essento to develop insect-based products and would start selling insect burgers and meat balls from next spring.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Close encounters of the insects | News, Sports, Jobs - The Express

Close encounters of the insects | News, Sports, Jobs - The Express | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
But there is a move afoot to increase our dietary intake of insects. A few years back, the United Nations put out a report entitled “Edible Insects: Future Prospects for Food and Feed Security” as a way to provide nutrients for a growing world population. While we may find eating insects distasteful, certain cultures obtain protein and nutrients through a steady diet of insects.

Closer to home, a Penn State student recently explored the use of crickets (ground up as a substitute for flour) as an ingredient for baking.

Next time you throw snow peas, broccoli and eggplant into your stir fry, remember that you are getting some protein from the hiding insects.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Entomologist to talk about insects as food

Entomologist to talk about insects as food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Aaron Dossey, founder and owner of All Things Bugs, will present "Developing Insects for Food, Feed, Pharma and Other Valuable Applications" at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 24, in 231 Waters Hall. Light refreshments will be served before the seminar, and all are welcome to attend.

Dossey is a lifelong, self-taught entomologist and enthusiast of entomology and nature, as anyone who has ever known him can strongly attest. He received his bachelor's degree in biochemistry and molecular biology, cum laude, from Oklahoma State University in 2001, with minors in chemistry and mathematics. He graduated with his doctorate in biochemistry and molecular biology from the University of Florida in 2006.

The central theme of his research is to capitalize on the chemical and biological diversity which exists among arthropods for a host of applications including drug discovery, identifying new insect repellents and how insects might contribute to a more sustainable human food supply.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Eating crickets? BYU researchers taste-testing insect protein | KSL.com

Eating crickets? BYU researchers taste-testing insect protein | KSL.com | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Brigham Young University researchers are studying how cricket protein may become a more palatable and regular part of Western cuisine.

“I don’t think that the United States market is familiar with eating crickets,” said Laura Jefferies, an associate professor of food science. “A whole cricket, I think, seems like just a little too much for a lot of people.”

Grounding crickets down into a powder, though, seems to make a difference.

“Then people are far more willing to give it a try,” she said.

Jefferies and her students have been conducting taste-testing research on bars and protein powder made by Salt Lake City-based Chapul, weighing how factors like consistency and nutritional value make a difference with consumer preferences.

“We work with companies as they’re producing brand new products or changing formulations and then we bring consumers in to taste those products and give feedback that helps to drive the next direction those companies will go,” Jefferies said.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Crickets are a hot new source of protein — but their real value could lie in the poop they produce

Crickets are a hot new source of protein — but their real value could lie in the poop they produce | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
PORT CREDIT, Ont. — It’s an idyllic scene: tall pine trees line the sidewalks of the street in the Toronto suburb where Jakob Dzamba lives. Stone steps lead to his front door where Athos, a friendly black Eurasier, is always the first to greet visitors to the detached two-storey mid-century home.

But the basement-level garage tells a different story. Inside, plastic storage bins are filled with egg cartons that have been transformed into colonies for insects. Before visitors’ eyes adjust to the dim lighting, they hear the chirping cacophony of hundreds of thousands of crickets.

Dzamba is the founder of Third Millennium Farming and the garage is where he raises his bugs as a food source. The 34-year-old, a candidate for a PhD in architecture at McGill University, has created a “counter-top cricket reactor” which a family could use to create their own cricket ecosystem: the insects are fed household food waste and after six weeks, when the crickets are mature, they can be harvested and consumed.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Hi-so Bug Eating: Low-carbon eating is the latest food trend and it’s bugging us out

Hi-so Bug Eating: Low-carbon eating is the latest food trend and it’s bugging us out | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Eating bugs is nothing new in Thailand. It’s the selfie that every backpacker longs for when they finally make it to Khaosan, and in certain regions of the country, it’s a daily menu option no different than chicken or pork.
For most Bangkokians, the greatest pleasures in life can be had while enjoying the city’s food. Whether that means picking up some spicy larb moo or pad krapow gai from the food cart on your soi, or selecting a juicy slab of Wagyu fillet steak from your favorite restaurant, the feeling of anticipation as you decide what you’re going to eat is second-to-none.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Why this company thinks you might like mealworms and crickets in your meatballs | EmaxHealth

Why this company thinks you might like mealworms and crickets in your meatballs | EmaxHealth | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
VTT technologies is working on developing a way to add more protein to the likes of meatballs and falafels from mealworms and crickets. There has been a push to get the public to embrace the notion of insects for foods and maybe for very good reasons.
According to a press release, the company has already developed food ingredients from the critters in advance of the growing trend for insect farming in Europe.
Extracting protein from insects to put in food can add new texture and flavor, the company says.
“A dry fractionation method developed by VTT can be used to easily produce insect fractions with varying flavours and degrees of coarseness: fine fractions contain small amounts of the insect chitin shell which tends to feel rough on the tongue and have a strong meat-like taste, while coarse fractions are milder in flavour and contain more chitin.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

12 Entomophagy Recipes that Will Have You Savoring Insects

12 Entomophagy Recipes that Will Have You Savoring Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Entomophagy—eating insects and arachnids—continues to be touted as a sustainable and healthy solution for our earth and our bodies. Other countries have long since turned to the critters for nutrition, with delicious meals to boast. The documentary Bugs explores cultures that the global gastronomy of entomophagy. But in the United States, diners aren’t swarming to the bug feast. Perhaps these enticing entomophagy recipes shall open their palates.

Madina Papadopoulos is a New York-based freelance writer, author, and regular contributor to Paste. You can follow her adventures on Instagram and Twitter.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

On Eating Insects – Essays, stories and recipes

On Eating Insects – Essays, stories and recipes | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

On Eating Insects – Essays, stories and recipes. A book by Nordic Food Lab published by Phaidon available for pre–order now.

Insects have been the center of many of our activities during the last years. In May 2016 we finished the Velux-funded project ‘Deliciousness of insects’, and naturally there has been many outcomes from that in the recent year - talks, press, publications, and very importantly a feature length-documentary film BUGS by Andreas Johnsen.

The last milestone we lay down for the project is the publication of a book. On eating Insects – Essays. Stories and recipes. The book is published by Phaidon, and it will be out in bookstores May 1st. It can be pre-ordered from the publisher through this link, or from major retailers. We list Nordic Food Lab as author, as we find that first and foremost this book is a result of the lab's work. We know that this is not the conventional way of authorship. The authors from the lab are Josh Evans, Roberto Flore and Michael Bom Frøst. Many other people contributed to the project and we are genuinely thankful for their work. This brief blogpost is not the right place to list all of them - they are mentioned in the book. But in particular we need to thank Chris Tønnesen for the beautiful images, Rene Redzepi and Mark Bomford of Yale's Sustainable Food Program for writing foreword and introduction. Lastly we thank our editors at Phaidon, Sophe Hodgkin and Ellie Smith. 

We really look forward to bring this book to the world.

The end of the project also meant that Josh moved on from the lab after being four years with us. We wish him all the best with his future studies at University of Cambridge.

The Nordic Food Lab will continue to investigate the gastronomic potential of insects in the coming years. Michael and Roberto will be involved in a new large insect project - InValuable - with many partners in Denmark and abroad. Here our role is smaller but as essential – the creation of delicious insect foods.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Crikey! Fruit fly flour beats crickets for cost, says Israeli start-up

Crikey! Fruit fly flour beats crickets for cost, says Israeli start-up | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
CEO and co-founder Eron Gronich told FoodNavigator the powders are ideal for use in applications ranging from sweet and savoury bakery products and sports nutrition foods to dairy-free cheese.

The start-up intends on positioning the fruit fly oil, on the other hand, as a high-end consumer facing product - to rival olive oil for instance - rather than for industrial frying.

Meanwhile, the whole unprocessed fruit fly larvae can be used as a replacement to minced meat for a more sustainable alternative in hamburgers or nuggets.

The powders are very light- and heat-stable and have a shelf-life of between six to 18 months depending on the application, said Gronich. “There is a range of flavours, [from] nutty to natural, as it depends on the amount of oil in the powder. We are producing whole powder as well as reduced fat powder.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Should edible insects be regulated like food? | New Food Economy

Should edible insects be regulated like food? | New Food Economy | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
By this time, you’ve probably heard more than you ever wanted to know about crickets as food for people: their high protein content, their efficiency at turning feed into protein, their tiny environmental footprint, their absolute inevitability as the food of the future (or not).

The one thing that always seems to get left out of the discussion, though, is how crickets and grasshoppers and mealworms fit—or don’t fit—into the food regulatory system. Basically everything you put into your mouth is regulated in some form or other in this country, but insects as food, at least last time we wrote about them, seemed to be falling through the cracks. That’s potentially bad for consumers—and bad for cricket producers because it leaves the door open to company-destroying surprises. So we decided to check in with Robert Nathan Allen, founder of Little Herds, a not-for-profit dedicated to advancing the cause of insect eating. Allen is an old-timer by cricket industry standards, which means that he’s been working in the field for about four years. And as an educator in the field, he’s got a better-than-average familiarity with the ins and outs of the industry.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

The 17 superfoods that are set to be 2017’s hottest food trends

The 17 superfoods that are set to be 2017’s hottest food trends | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Edible insects, animal organs and bacon-flavoured red algae are just some of the superfoods set to become huge health food trends this year, according to experts.

A total of 17 foods will feature increasingly on menus and appear on supermarket shelves more and more, say insiders - ranging from the exotic kakadu plum to goat meat.

From healthy alternatives to sugar and chocolate to super fruits and nutritious substitutes for pasta, these are the foods to eat if you want your new year's healthy resolution to last more than a month.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Koppert Cress serves buffalo’s in recently opened Fair Food restaurant | Proti-Farm

Koppert Cress serves buffalo’s in recently opened Fair Food restaurant | Proti-Farm | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Monster, The Netherlands – Koppert Cress recently opened their new Rob & Bob Fair Food restaurant with daily  healthy meals for their own employees which can be enriched by buffalo’s from Proti-Farm, a source of healthy, natural proteins.

Koppert Cress’ mission is to provide its employees with healthy and natural meals by always looking for new and innovative ingredients. In order to keep improving the quality of their meals they have been focused on lowering sugar (50%) in the last three years and using all kind of natural ingredients.

Today Proti-Farm’s CEO visited their site and was impressed with the initiative. Thank you to the team of  Koppert Cress for this healthy choice!

More to come soon.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Xochi Will Bring Oaxacan Dishes and Edible Insects to Houston in January

Xochi Will Bring Oaxacan Dishes and Edible Insects to Houston in January | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Dynamic duo chef Hugo Ortega and Tracy Vaught have finally revealed new details about their forthcoming restaurant, Xochi. On Thursday, the H Town Restaurant Group confirmed that the full-service eatery headed for Marriott Marquis Houston Downtown hotel will debut in next month with an Oaxacan-inspired menu.

“Oaxaca is so rich with culinary diversity and traditions and is a place I never tire of visiting,” chef Ortega says in a statement. “Its large size and numerous geographic regions hold endless interest for me as a chef and as a Mexican native.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Bugs On the Menu on iTunes

Bugs On the Menu on iTunes | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

About the Movie
The sound of crickets isn’t always a good thing, but to the entrepreneurs of Entomo Farms, it’s the sound of their rapidly growing business. The Goldin brothers raise cricket protein for human consumption, and they’ve seen their farm grow tenfold in 24 months. The surge of interest has been sparked by a 200 page UN report outlining the health and environmental benefits of insect protein -- that has been downloaded 7 million times. While an estimated 2 billion people eat bugs worldwide, it’s still not an accepted food in the west. With the population projected to surpass 9 billion by 2050, the time to consider alternate proteins is now.
more...
No comment yet.