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Commerce au régime sans insecte - Programmes

Commerce au régime sans insecte - Programmes | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
La Première contribue de façon centrale au mandat de service public en offrant un programme généraliste, axé sur l'information, l'offre sociétale, culturelle « grand public », l'offre de services et le divertissement.
Ana C. Day's insight:

Aujourd'hui à 08:30. Radio RTS la 1 ère:
Commerce au régime sans insecte
Des insectes sont consommés dans certaines parties du monde. 

Des insectes sont consommés dans certaines parties du monde. [Kirill Kedrinski - Fotolia]
Une interpellation parlementaire voulait rendre possible le commerce d'insectes à manger. Le Conseil fédéral s'oppose à ce nouveau marché et dit ...Mehr anzeigen"

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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Current State of Legislation For Insects As Food - 4ento

Current State of Legislation For Insects As Food - 4ento | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Is selling Insects as Food legal? Find out what the current state of legislation is for edible insects and what the future holds for this rising trend.
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Are Edible Insects the Future?

Are Edible Insects the Future? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Did you know edible insects are extremely healthy for you? They are high in protein, low in fat and filled with vitamins and nutrients.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Originally lobster was regarded as a dirty creature, unfit for human consumption. It was only seen as fertilizer and, at best, poor people’s food. Fast forward a few hundred years and this crustacean is a highly saught after food source, enjoyed by millions, and bringing with it notions of luxury and fine dining. Could this be the same for edible insects?

A diet enjoyed by millions around the globe, edible insects are quickly becoming a popular substitute for protein. A new generation of chefs, farmers, sustainability experts, foodies, and the United Nations are all embracing entomophagy (eating insects). But why is this?"

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Rustle Up Some Grub - Cricket Nettle Pesto - YouTube

Check out our AWARD-WINNING cricket nettle pesto recipe! A version of this recipe was recently selected as the winner of the Instructables Paleo Recipe Chall...

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Estudiantes de la UCR crean galletas a base de insectos - Nacional - Noticias

Estudiantes de la UCR crean galletas a base de insectos - Nacional - Noticias | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Jimena González y Cristiana Azofeifa visitaron Telenoticias para brindar más detalles de su propuesta y para enseñar a preparar estos alimentos.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Según los expertos, consumir insectos aporta grandes cantidades de proteína, hierro y vitamina A. Y aunque parezca difícil de creer, el sabor es apetecido por muchos.

Los proyectos fueron seleccionados entre más de 50 propuestas de todo el mundo y el 12 de julio las estudiantes viajarán a Chicago a representar el país.

Jimena González y Cristiana Azofeifa, dos estudiantes de Ingeniería de Alimentos, visitaron Telenoticias para brindar más detalles de su propuesta y para enseñarnos a preparar estos alimentos."

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Top 5 Reasons Why You Should Go To Pestaurant

Top 5 Reasons Why You Should Go To Pestaurant | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Discover the top 5 reasons why you should attend Ehrlich Pest Control's pop-up Pestaurant in Boston, MA
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Did you know that insects are a staple of the diet of around 2 billion people around the world? The U.N. has actively encouraged and promoted the eating of insects to fight global hunger. There are over 1,900 insects in the world that are considered edible and many of them are full of protein and fiber. “Entomophagy” is the consumption of insects. Growing insects for human consumption is a very sustainable way to produce food. They require very little land to grow and emit significant less emissions than other animals."

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Don't eat bugs to save the world, but because they're tasty - Conservation

Don't eat bugs to save the world, but because they're tasty - Conservation | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Most efforts to promote insect cuisine have focused on its environmental benefits. Instead, perhaps bugs should just be presented as tasty?
Ana C. Day's insight:

"There are simply too many people on the planet – and too many people yet to be born – to feed them all with protein derived from chickens, sheep, pigs, and cows. Our carnivorous impulses are to blame, at least in part, for the increasing loss of biodiversity and wild landscapes across the planet, as forests, jungles, and savannahs are converted into pastures for domestic livestock. One possible strategy is to convince more people that insects are a viable source of protein as well. But it’s been an uphill battle."

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Little Johnny bug-eyed about potential of edible bug industry

Little Johnny bug-eyed about potential of edible bug industry | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

"We got an e-mail from an old friend the other day. The gist of the memo was this: invest now and retire in style. He advised me to start a cottage industry in my own backyard.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"Bugs are the hot, new gastronomic item in Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam and other Southeast Asia and Middle Eastern nations. Several East African countries have been exploiting the plentiful supply of six-legged creatures for centuries.

I’ve heard the trend of eating bugs has even caught on in California, where avant-garde gourmet restaurants are buzzing with an assortment of exoskeleton treats. “They have rich texture, and the flavors are like nothing you’ve ever tasted,” reported one Hollywood diner on a recent talk show."

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Cricket flour: Coming to the baking aisle near you? | KSL.com

Cricket flour: Coming to the baking aisle near you? | KSL.com | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Salmon, spinach, acai and beets may soon have to make way for a new superfood — bugs.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"While the thought of consuming the creepy, crawly creatures may have you gagging, consider this: They’re actually every health advocate’s dream. Packed with protein (twice as much as beef), B12, iron and omega-3s — they’re also low in fat and cholesterols, which is precisely why Americans should consider integrating insects into their diets.

At least that’s the argument of environmentalist Pat Crowley, founder of Chapul, the maker of Original Cricket Bar. His product was the first insect-based nutritional product in the U.S., and his mission now is to introduce the company’s signature cricket flour into mainstream grocery stores."

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The Routledge Handbook of Sustainable Food and Gastronomy (Hardback) - Routledge

The Routledge Handbook of Sustainable Food and Gastronomy (Hardback) - Routledge | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The issues surrounding the provision, preparation and development of food products is fundamental to every human being on the planet. Given the scarcity of agricultural land, environmental pollution, climate change and the exponential growth of the...
Ana C. Day's insight:

The title includes a foreword written by Roberto Flore, Head Chef at the Nordic Food Lab, Copenhagen, Denmark.


Part 5: Food Innovation/ Future 18. Broadening insect gastronomy Afton Halloran, Christopher Münke, Paul Vantomme, Benedict Reade and Josh Evans 19. Wild ideas in food  Christopher Münke, Afton Halloran, Paul Vantomme, Josh Evans, Benedict Reade, Roberto Flore, Roland Rittman, Anders Lindén, Pavlos Georgiadis and Miles Irving 20. Foods from aquaculture: varied and growing Ricardo Radulovich 21. Fermentation Art and Science at Nordic Food Lab Benedict Reade, Justine de Valicourt and Joshua Evans

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Each Bottle of This Gin Is Flavored With the Venom and Pheromones of 62 Ants

Each Bottle of This Gin Is Flavored With the Venom and Pheromones of 62 Ants | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Unlike scorpion vodka, snake whiskey or cheap mezcal, no deceased creatures await you at the bottom of a bottle of Anty Gin. Instead, it's distilled quart by quart from an infusion of more than 6,000 foraged red wood ants and ethanol.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Created as a collaboration between The Cambridge Distillery and Copenhagen's Nordic Food Lab, the idea for the gin "evolved parallel with with our growing fascination of [red wood ants'] flavor," says Nordic Food Lab's Product Development Manager Jonas Pederson. "[We're] trying to use deliciousness as an argument for entomophagy (the scientific term for eating bugs)."

Red wood ants produce formic acid as a defense mechanism as well as a host of pheromones. These chemicals are very reactive with ethanol, so distillation produces a citrusy flavor (from the formic acid) along with a bunch of scent compounds (from the pheromones) to yield a unique taste combination."

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Can Eating Insects Save the World?

Can Eating Insects Save the World? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
When: 11 June 2015
Start time: 18:45
End time: 21:15
Where: Glasgow Science Centre, 50 Pacific Quay, Glasgow G51 1EA


A free event for the Glasgow Science Festival, including film screening, expert Q&A and insect tasters! Join the Society of Biology, and a host of insect and culinary experts for a screening of the BBC documentary ‘Can eating insects save the world?' presented by TV gastronaut Stefan Gates. We have organised this special screenin
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The film will be followed by an interactive discussion and Q&A with scientists and food experts who are pioneering entomophagy as a tasty, healthy and sustainable source of food for all of us. There will also be a chance to taste insects!

Speakers include Rhonda Smith from Minerva Communications; Rhonda is involved in the PROTEINSECT project. Food journalist Diane Fresquez and bug-cuisine pioneers from the charitable organisation Bugs for Life will also be on the panel. Further information Soft drinks and nibbles (including insect tasters!) will be provided after the panel discussion. Book your free place via the link. 

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Bugs: Not What's For Dinner — Until They're Tastier, Maybe

Bugs: Not What's For Dinner — Until They're Tastier, Maybe | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
ELIZA BARCLAY
Ana C. Day's insight:

"In the last couple of years, we've detected a faint buzz about crispy crickets and crunchy mealworms. Companies pedaling scorpion lollipops and peanut butter-and-jelly protein bars made with cricket flour have thrust their wares into our hands and mailboxes. 

It's truly gotten easier to snack on bugs, should you want to do so. And everyone from the earnest eco-entrepreneurs in towns like Austin and Boulder, to international luminaries like Kofi Annan to the Food and Agriculture Organization are raving about how sustainable bugs are compared to meat."

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Edible Insects Taking Off

Edible Insects Taking Off | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The food industry is buzzing over a new trend that could completely change our primary source of protein. If you haven’t yet tried insects, it could be happening sooner than you think. Introducing ...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"As well as being a versatile product, insects are also an extremely sustainable source of nutrients. They offer an excellent alternative to cattle, which require large amounts of feed, land and water. The common British water boatman, for example, contains four times more iron than beef and certain African caterpillars contain more protein than can be found in the same quantity of chicken. Insects also have a higher efficiency of conversion. As they are cold blooded, they do not require energy to maintain their body temperatures and so can convert more for growth. More efficient use of feed for growth means that in total less feed is required to create the same quantity of protein found in chicken or beef."

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Depuis Toulouse, Micronutris veut lever 1,5 million d'euros

Depuis Toulouse, Micronutris veut lever 1,5 million d'euros | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Micronutris envisage de lever des fonds pour l'agrandissement du site de production entièrement automatisé et le lancement de nouveaux produits pour le grand public. Dont 500.000 par le biais de la plateforme toulousaine de financement participatif Wiseed. Un temps d'avance sur la consommation de demain. Cédric Auriol, 32 ans, le fondateur de Micronutris, estime que le marché de l'entomophagie - la consommation d'insectes - « va décoller de façon forte ». Le patron anticipe le boom en développan
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Un temps d’avance sur la consommation de demain. Cédric Auriol, 32 ans, le fondateur de Micronutris, estime que le marché de l’entomophagie - la consommation d’insectes - « va décoller de façon forte ». Le patron anticipe le boom en développant la structure qui emploie 12 personnes."

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No coma cuento, coma insectos | VICE | Colombia

No coma cuento, coma insectos | VICE | Colombia | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
La idea es que pasemos de comer carne a comer pedazos de un animal que hubieras aplastado con tu chancleta sin pensarlo dos veces. Los insectos son un alternativa sostenible, nutritiva y hasta deliciosa para calmar el hambre en el planeta.
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The Future of Animal Products in the Human Diet: Health and Environmental Concerns | The Nutrition Society

The Future of Animal Products in the Human Diet: Health and Environmental Concerns | The Nutrition Society | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Come and hear leading experts in the field discuss the latest scientific research and developments on the use and sustainability of animal products in the human diet. You can see a preview interview with one of our conference speakers, Professor Arnold van Huis from Wageningen University in The Netherlands below. - See more at: http://www.nutritionsociety.org/future-animal-products-human-diet-health-and-environmental-concerns#sthash.kRiozXFD.dpuf

Ana C. Day's insight:

DAY THREE: Wednesday 8 July
Plenary Lecture three:


11:35  Boyd Orr Lecture
Professor Arnold van Huis, Wageningen University, The Netherlands
Insects are the future? - See more at: http://www.nutritionsociety.org/provisional-programme-4#sthash.FxeVQocg.dpuf


full Programm http://www.nutritionsociety.org/provisional-programme-4

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Expert: Eat More Bugs -- They're Not So Bad!

Expert: Eat More Bugs -- They're Not So Bad! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
To most of the Western world, eating bugs might sound like a challenge out of a reality show circa 2001.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"To most of the Western world, eating bugs might sound like a challenge out of a reality show circa 2001. In a new op-ed published on Nature.com, however, British researcher Ophelia Deroy is trying to change minds.

Western culture views insects as a source of disease and infection while, in reality, they provide a sustainable source of protein. In an interview earlier this month with The Guardian, UN Secretary General Kofi Annan pointed out that two billion people already eat insects as a source of animal protein. "Insects have a very good conversion rate from feed to meat," he said. "Eating insects is good for the environment and balanced diets.""

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6 Gross Bugs That Taste Better Than They Look And Are Actually Good For You

6 Gross Bugs That Taste Better Than They Look And Are Actually Good For You | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
  Recently my family took a class where we really, truly, ate creepy crawlers. Not because we’re fringe enough to want to ingest them every day, but because the class was offered by a local ga...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The presentation was led by two experts from Colorado State University, and I can honestly say I found it much more fascinating and relevant than I was anticipating. I learned so many things, like that insects are arthropods, just like shrimp, crab and lobster. So, eating bugs is essentially like eating seafood. This helped tremendously when it was time to put my first meal worm in my mouth…."

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Entomophagy recipies: Chocolate Chirp Cookies | deBugged

Entomophagy recipies: Chocolate Chirp Cookies | deBugged | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Made using Cricket Flour and Dry Roasted Crickets, these Cookies are a brilliant way to ease yourself into the wide world of Entomophagy.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Made using cricket flour and dry roasted crickets, these cookies are a brilliant way to ease yourself into the wide world of entomophagy (eating insects). A healthy alternative to regular chocolate chip cookies, these tasty treats are packed full of protein and are superbly delicious!"

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Cricket flour: Coming to the baking aisle near you?

Cricket flour: Coming to the baking aisle near you? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Salmon, spinach, acai and beets may soon have to make way for a new superfood — bugs.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"While the thought of consuming the creepy, crawly creatures may have you gagging, consider this: They’re actually every health advocate’s dream. Packed with protein (twice as much as beef), B12, iron and omega-3s — they’re also low in fat and cholesterols, which is precisely why Americans should consider integrating insects into their diets."

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5.28.15 Pfunkcast: SENZU Foods and Latteria Italiana

We talked about the nutritional value of eating edible insect products and also talked about delicious Italian gelato.
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Here’s how to talk people into eating more bugs

Here’s how to talk people into eating more bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
New ideas on how to make us fall in love with insectivory — the environmentally friendly practice of eating insects.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"In general, it’s hard to convince people to eat bugs — but that hasn’t stopped policymakers from trying.

For years, sustainable food experts in Western countries have pushed the insect-eating agenda, touting the practice’s nutritional and environmental benefits. Insects are high in protein, relatively inexpensive to raise and have a lower carbon footprint than other food animals like cows or chickens, they often argue. And in other areas of the world, including parts of Africa, Asia and Central and South America, insects are a regular part of the local cuisine."

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Events - Can eating insects save the world?

Events -  Can eating insects save the world? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A free event for the Glasgow Science Festival, including film screening, expert Q&A and insect tasters!
Ana C. Day's insight:

Join the Society of Biology, and a host of insect and culinary experts for a screening of the BBC documentary ‘Can eating insects save the world?' presented by TV gastronaut Stefan Gates. We have organised this special screening, at the fantastic Glasgow Science Centre, as part of the Glasgow Science Festival. The film will be followed by an interactive discussion and Q&A with scientists and food experts who are pioneering entomophagy as a tasty, healthy and sustainable source of food for all of us. There will also be a chance to taste insects!

Speakers include Rhonda Smith from Minerva Communications; Rhonda is involved in the PROTEINSECT project. Food journalist Diane Fresquez and bug-cuisine pioneers from the charitable organisation Bugs for Life will also be on the panel. 

Further information
Soft drinks and nibbles (including insect tasters!) will be provided after the panel discussion. A pay bar will also be open for those wishing to buy alcoholic drinks. Book your free place via the link above. If you have any questions about the event please email Penny Fletcher.

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Charlie Gilmour investigates life as an insectivore

Charlie Gilmour investigates life as an insectivore | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The underside of the log is crawling with life; poisonous centipedes, slugs, beetles. Even a tiny little toad hunkers down grumpily against the unwelcome invasion of light. “Scoop them up, quick!” says wild food expert Nick Weston, gesturing to the colony of “wood shrimp” — woodlice to you and me — now scattering in a hundred different directions. I snatch as many of the amuse-bouches as I can before they escape into the undergrowth. We’ve only been hunting for about 20 minutes but our little en
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Insect Protein Bars On The Rise With Psychology-Based Marketing

Insect Protein Bars On The Rise With Psychology-Based Marketing | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insect protein could be a cutting edge source of nutrition. But if the insect protein movement wants to win hearts and minds, it has to start with taste buds.
Ana C. Day's insight:

CBS SF) — Insect protein could be a cutting-edge source of nutrition. But if the insect protein movement wants to win hearts and minds, it has to start with taste buds.

The bugs are killed in the freezer, washed and baked in the oven. Then they’re milled into cricket flour, which is said to have a toasty, nutty and earthy flavor.

Greg Sewitz is one of the co-founders of the Exo protein bars.

He says the key is to get people to at least try it. That’s why the wrapper has no pictures of crickets.

“We did a lot of research into the psychology of disgust,” Sewitz said. “And obviously it’s kind of intuitive that you wouldn’t want to put a picture of something people find gross on a food package as you’re about to ask them to eat it.”

Pound for pound, crickets have about as much protein as beef."

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