Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Diary of a Bugs Journey - Invenire Market Intelligence

Diary of a Bugs Journey - Invenire Market Intelligence | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Can edible bugs have a real impact? Insects need to become big. For our sake, and for our planet. Follow our journey to revolutionise food production
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Edible insects is just one dream. And just one journey.

Taking up the challenge to create a better future is not a simple journey. There are challenges, hurdles and tests of commitment.

But the journey is also one of growth, new skills and deeper understanding. The path contains new friends and partners with common visions. And the destination is a better world with your dream a reality.

 

Anyone can be a Leader. You just have to start your journey."

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HOW TO: Rehydrate Freeze-Dried Insects – Gastrobug

HOW TO: Rehydrate Freeze-Dried Insects – Gastrobug | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
They aren't any bigger than the grasshoppers we've seen jumping around all our lives, but when you know you're going to eat them, they look pretty big! So there's a little bit of intimidation there, still, and we'll be putting up our experiments with them, and our experience trying them for the first time, pretty soon.

But!

These bad boys are freeze dried, which is awesome. If you're not sure what freeze-drying is, it's when something gets frozen, then then reducing the surrounding air pressure (by using a vacuum, ideally) such that the frozen water sublimates directly from the solid ice phase to the gas phase, leaving the frozen item wonderfully dry and shelf-stable. So they can stay out in room temperature, basically for years. It's a good way to keep food stored for a long time, and is better than canning at retaining the nutrients in the food.
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Why This Company Decided Not to Hide its Biggest 'Weakness'

Why This Company Decided Not to Hide its Biggest 'Weakness' | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Most protein bars have an image on their wrapper. Gatorade, PowerBar and Nature Valley show the food itself, often coated in chocolate. Clif Bar shows a rock climber. But Exo’s packaging is minimalist, with no image. That’s because its founders feared drawing too much attention to its special ingredient: crickets.

It’s not as if Exo hides anything -- “cricket powder” is on the package, though in a smaller font than “protein bar.” But when it launched last year as part of a boomlet of cricket-selling startups, nobody knew what Americans would swallow. So Exo was understated. Then paleo diet and CrossFit enthusiasts embraced crickets, Exo netted $4 million in Series A financing and Exo became a leader in this burgeoning industry.
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Grub's up: Eat insects at Wakehurst Place this weekend

Grub's up: Eat insects at Wakehurst Place this weekend | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
1. EAT INSECTS

Wild Food Festival at Wakehurst Place, Ardingly - Saturday, July 2 and Sunday, July 3
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Edible aquatic insects vanishing in Loktak: Researchers – Eastern Mirror

Edible aquatic insects vanishing in Loktak: Researchers – Eastern Mirror | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
IMPHAL, June 27:Manipur’s important edible aquatic insects found in Loktak, the largest freshwater lake in North East India, are vanishing from its natural habitat due to the ongoing degradation of the lake’s biodiversity.

To name a few are Naosek (Lethocerus indicus)- the giant water bug; Tharaikokpi (cybister)- a genus of beetle; Konjeng Kokphai (Diplonychus rusticus)- another water bug; and Long Khajing (Gerris Lacustris)- the common pond skater; and Maikhumbi (Baetidae)- a family of mayflies etc.

This came to light during a recent study of diversity of insect fauna in Loktak Lake of Manipur by Dr. M Bhubaneshwari Devi, a zoology teacher in Manipur’s premier DM College of Science, in association with senior research scholar, O Sandhyarani.

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A Famous Edible Bug Market in Beijing Is Closing

A Famous Edible Bug Market in Beijing Is Closing | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Beijing's Donghuamen Night Market has been selling bug delicacies for over three decades, but its time selling edible scorpions on a stick, among other items, is now drawing to a close. According to the Australian Associated Press, the market, usually teeming with customers, will close Friday.

The market is popular with tourists and locals alike, but after loud criticism from neighbors—it can get quite noisy and is said to smell like "stinky tofu"—authorities decided to shut it down, according to the AAP. 
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Insect protein bars available at 15% discount

Insect protein bars available at 15% discount | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Crobar, the UK’s first insect-based food product, has launched two new flavours of protein bar.

Following the success of the original flavours, Gathr now has two new additions to the Crobar family: coffee & vanilla and raspberry & cacao  (rrp £1.79).

All of the Crobar range contain real fruit and nuts, protein-rich cricket flour and contain no gluten, dairy or soy. Crobar never add sugars or sweeteners.
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I Tasted the Future of Food…and It’s Bugs

I Tasted the Future of Food…and It’s Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Last weekend, the Food Loves Tech expo featured dozens of companies using technology and future-forward concepts such as sustainability to create really innovative food products and services. One of the big pushes at the expo was the idea of insects as food.

Bugs were in fact, big at the event.

My first ever intentional consumption of insects was at the booth of Home Grown Cricket Farm. The company makes a do-it-yourself cricket farm kit that is targeted to urban farmers. The idea is to give individuals a way to grow their own protein at home.

A plate of dried crickets was at the center of the booth. The insects were fully intact—legs and antennae attached.
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SPECIAL REPORT: Insects as a Sustainable Protein Source

SPECIAL REPORT: Insects as a Sustainable Protein Source | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
27 Jun 2016 --- As last week was National Insect Week (UK), FoodIngredientsFirst takes a closer look at insects as an alternative protein, other nutritional values and today’s progression of entomophagy into the western world.

In 2013 the United Nations Food & Agriculture Organization stressed that a new approach to food production was crucial if we are to avoid future shortages. Their suggestion was edible insects. It is their sustainability credentials that has lead the UN to highlight insects as the potential future of food, requiring minimal resources to farm and producing substantially less waste than conventional livestock.
 
Around 2 billion people around the world already consume insects as part of their regular diet due to their high nutritional value, versatility and flavor. The planet’s population is expected to exceed 9 billion by 2050, and current food production will need to almost double. The human consumption of insects is something which has been widely accepted in many parts of the world including China, Thailand and Japan.
 
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How to foster a buzzing edible insects industry

How to foster a buzzing edible insects industry | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A Finnish project is to investigate the main hurdles and opportunities for the edible insect industry by linking up input from multidisciplinary players from relevant sectors. 
Invenire Market Intelligence secured €100,000 in preliminary funding from Tekes, the Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation, to spend six months researching business hurdles and opportunities for edible insects and to scope out what multidisciplinary players could be brought in to meet these challenges.

Johanna Tanhuanpää, executive consultant and partner at Invenire, told us the three main hurdles facing the sector were technology, regulation and consumer acceptance.

She said the project was about looking at the role of edible insects within an overall sustainable protein ecosystem. 

This meant going beyond insects alone and could see partnership with other sustainable protein sources like algae as well engagement with technology firms.  
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Insects as food and feed: European perspectives on recent research and future priorities (Forthcoming)

This paper discusses the current state and priorities of Europe-based research on insects as food and feed, based on presentations at a workshop held in December 2015, and discussions that followed. We divide research into studies that focus on farming, health and nutrition, and those that prioritise psychological, social and political concerns. Edible insects are not necessarily universally beneficial. However, certain food insects can convert organic waste material, and provide nutrient-rich protein for humans and animals. Recent research is not concordant when trying to identify social and psychological barriers to insects as food in Europe, indicating the complexity of the issue of consumer acceptance. Innovative means of marketing insects as food include 3D printing, scientific comics, and the promotion of rural food culture in an urban setting. Edible insects are intimately connected to strong cultural and regional values, and their increasing commercialisation may empower and/or disenfranchise those who hold such values. We conclude with a discussion about the future priorities of edible insect research in Europe. We acknowledge the political nature of the ‘entomophagy’ movement. With legislative change, the insect food industry potential presents an opportunity to challenge the dynamics of current food systems. We identify the following priorities for future research: the need to better understand environmental impacts of insect procurement on both a regional and global scale, to investigate factors affecting the safety and quality of insect foods, to acknowledge the complexity of consumer acceptance, and to monitor the social and economic impacts of this growing industry.
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Stamford museum holds “Insect Extravaganza”

Stamford museum holds “Insect Extravaganza” | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The event, “Insect Extravaganza,” will take place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday at the 39 Scofieldtown Road center.
Participants will explore the world of six-legged creatures and other invertebrates and search for insects in the nature center’s stream, pond and forest. They will also have the chance to try some edible insects and enjoy insect-themed crafts.
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These Brothers Eat Crickets and They Think You Should Too

These Brothers Eat Crickets and They Think You Should Too | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Darren Goldin and his brothers had been farming crickets for reptile feed when a UN report on the future of food highlighted insect protein as a good way to feed growing the world’s growing population. Today, the brothers’ business Entomo Farms is producing ten million crickets a week, all for human consumption. (Video by Katherine Wells, Lucy Wells) (Source: Bloomberg)
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Edible Insects Market is predicted to display CAGR more than 40% by 2023

Edible Insects Market is predicted to display CAGR more than 40% by 2023 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Get a sample copy of this report @ https://goo.gl/1ASPOK
Shift in focus towards adopting bug consumption for both human and animal is likely to drive global edible insects market. Increase in bugs consumption owing to growing health concerns and avoiding unhealthy foods may favor product demand. Bugs finds applications animal feed mainly in poultry and fish.
It is estimated that one hectare of land could produce at least 150 tons of insect protein per year. Eatable bug production may increase over the due course, particularly in U.S., UK, China, and Brazil. Consumer awareness regarding health benefits and rising application in food industry has led to increase in edible insects market growth. Climate change has a major role over desired product farming.
Edible Insects Market size was over USD 33 million in 2015 with global industry gains expected at more than 40% CAGR up to 2023.

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Aussie tastebugs: the unlikely business success of breeding edible insects - Business Research and Insights

Aussie tastebugs: the unlikely business success of breeding edible insects - Business Research and Insights | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Skye Blackburn, founder of the Edible Bug Shop, is easing mainstream Australians through the “ick factor” of entomophagy – eating bugs. Partnering with celebrity chefs such as René Redzepi, Matt Stone and Kylie Kwong, she ships 400 kilograms of insects a week and is in discussions about supplying health food stores and major supermarket chains.
Ana C. Day's insight:

As far as business opportunities go, edible insects wouldn’t seem to be a winner, at least in Australia. After all, when is the last time you saw anyone based in this part of the world nibbling some salted, roasted ants?

So, it’s no surprise to learn that for a long time Australia had no edible insect industry at all. What most people would find astonishing is that a young female entrepreneur is singlehandedly creating one.

Skye Blackburn has been fascinated with insects since she was a child and studied entomology at university. Suspecting she would find it hard to make a living in entomology, she also studied food science.”

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Bugs & Bubbly!

Bugs & Bubbly! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
We all know the traditional food pairings with Champagne. Arthur Lambert, a student at the Ecole de Design in Troyes, decided to use a still unusual one for a project but it’s not for the fainthearted.

Les Champagnes de Vignerons had the idea for a competitive exam. They wanted a new promotional accessory for their members Champagne. This challenge was given to 18 second year students at the design school. They worked on their different projects for two months.

Less than half were then chosen to present them to a jury in Epernay earlier in June. These included a plastic Champagne carrier corks with confetti inside them and a board game. The jury tried Champagne ice cream and were also given something quite different to eat.
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I Ate Crickets for 5 Days: Here's What Happened

I Ate Crickets for 5 Days: Here's What Happened | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
I Ate Crickets for 5 Days: Here's What HappenedTwo billion people eat insects regularly. Here’s why you should consider joining them—and what happened when our writer dined on insects for five straight days.
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Edible insect industry primed for growth

Edible insect industry primed for growth | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Ever since New Hope editor Todd Runestad wrote about cricket bars in 2013, the edible insect industry has exploded. While in 2014 just one insect protein product exhibited at Expo West (Chapul), now dozens of companies have hatched business plans focused on entomophagy. From cricket chips to mealworm protein to bitters infused with toasted crickets, now swarms of products feature winged, six-legged critters.
“The industry is less than five years old, but it’s astounding how many companies brought products to market and received significant investments,” says Robert Nathan Allen, president of the 2013-founded educational nonprofit Little Herds.
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We made the food of the future: wormy flapjacks | The Memo

We made the food of the future: wormy flapjacks | The Memo | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The Memo tries insects. They don't taste like you'd imagine.

Not too long ago, food futurologist Dr Morgaine Gaye told us how in the future we’ll all be eating insects.

But even now there are a number of British companies that already sell edible insects – and products made from them.

“Insects are already eaten and enjoyed around the world,” the co-founder of Eat Grub told The Memo.
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This new business is bringing the nutritional value of edible insects to the British public | Business Advice

This new business is bringing the nutritional value of edible insects to the British public | Business Advice | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
From French origins to a foray into the British market, edible insects business JIMINI’S is tapping into modern food trends to produce an offering already attracting the interests of Selfridges and Fortnum & Mason.

(1) Who are you and what’s your business?

JIMINI’S is a French startup designing and making delicious products with insects. Our goal is quite simple: we want to make people change their mind about edible insects so they can enjoy the high nutritional value of this food and lower the environmental impact of our occidental diets.

We make protein bars and seasoned insects in our own factory near Paris, France. My name is Constance Deseine and I am in charge to develop the UK market, I am also the very first employee of the team.
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Are insects the future crop for the vertical farmer?

Are insects the future crop for the vertical farmer? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
While some of us see vertical farms as the solution to produce our food in the future, most vertical growth operations currently still mainly produce a small selection of herbs and leafy greens. At the annual summit of the Association of Vertical Farming in Amsterdam last month, participants were inspired by speakers to think about including alternative crops that provide more nutritious value too. One of these were insects; with a creepy enthusiasm Peter Bickerton tried to convince us that bugs are the food of the future.
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Why we love to eat bugs and why you should too | Roberto Flore & Afton Halloran | TEDxLUISS

Published on Jun 23, 2016
During recent years, insects have been defined the food of the future. Roberto Flore and Afton Halloran explain why it is so: insects are not only a true delicacy but they also represent an opportunity to produce food in a sustainable way and to fight social problems due to a poor diet and malnutrition. What you are about to hear is a real food revolution.


Roberto Flore is Head Chef of the Nordic Food Lab and a Sardinian explorer of the Great North. Roberto’s gastronomic path started in Seneghe, a small village in Sardinia, at the age of 4. He encountered the Nordic Food Lab, where he is currently the Head Chef and leading the gastronomic research of this vibrant organization. One of Roberto’s main activities at the Lab has been working with edible insects.

Afton Halloran is a Canadian PhD Fellow at the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen. She is a part of the GREEiNSECT research group, a group of public and private institutions investigating how insects can be utilized for food and feed in Kenya. Her research focuses on the socio-economic, nutritional, and environmental impacts of cricket farming in Thailand and Kenya. She formerly worked as a consultant with the Insects for Food and Feed Programme at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in Rome. She is a co-author on the FAO’s most popular publication Edible insects: future prospects for food and feed security.
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Winners of Biomimicry, Forward Food Competitions Tackle Food Waste, Behavior Change Challenges | Sustainable Brands

Winners of Biomimicry, Forward Food Competitions Tackle Food Waste, Behavior Change Challenges | Sustainable Brands | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
One Hop Kitchen was the second runner-up and offers a line of products made with textured insect protein, using either mealworms or crickets. A serving of the company’s Bolognese pasta sauce contains five grams of protein per serving and saves 80 gallons of water, compared to the traditional beef option. It also contains half the saturated fat and a third of the cholesterol of standard meat-based pasta sauces. The products are gluten, dairy, soy and preservative-free but according to the founder: loaded with flavor. Participants in the blind taste test reported satisfaction with the sauce and did not suspect that it was made from insect protein.
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Bugs, here to solve world hunger - Journal of the San Juan Islands

Bugs, here to solve world hunger - Journal of the San Juan Islands | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
He has been called a champion of the obscure, and David George Gordon, writer of Eat-A-Bug Cook Book, as well as books on slugs, snails, tarantulas and cockroaches, admits that is a fair description of himself.

"It's easy to get people excited about orcas and eagles, but it's more satisfying for me to write and talk about natures underdogs too," said Gordon, shown right.

Gordon will be coming to the San Juan Islands on June 27, for his lecture, "Adventures in Entomophagy—Waiter, There's No Fly in My Soup!" at 7 p.m., at the San Juan Island Library. The talk will include free samples of edible insect snacks.
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Yummy or...? 5 creepy and delicious insects every Nigerian should try before they die (photos) ▷ NAIJ.COM

Would you ever eat a plate full of insects? Sure, most people would say ‘NO’ and even shake their heads in disgust.

Insects are considered as a good source of protein by some people and many Nigerians eat it.

Insects are plentiful and many are safe to eat but a few of them are dangerous.

Though they look creepy and poisonous, insects are healthy, nutritious, as well as delicious.

Edible insects have long been a part of the human diet and are consumed by a good number of people. They often contain high-quality protein, vitamins, minerals and amino acids for humans.

Some Nigerians are very adventurous with food and they eat insects which they consider a delicacy.
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