Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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House dust mite (Derp 10) and crustacean allergic patients may be at risk when consuming food containing mealworm proteins


Via Jacques Mignon
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Jacques Mignon's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:27 AM

From :

http://www.allergique.org/spip.php?breve928&lang=fr

 

"L’étude met en évidence une réactivité croisée avec l’extrait protéique de ténébrions. Qui plus est, cette réactivité croisée est fonctionnelle car les tests d’activation des basophiles de ces sujets sont positifs vis-à-vis de l’extrait protéique de ténébrions. La stabilité des allergènes est étudiée dans un modèle de digestion in vitro : ils sont assez stables."

 

 

Jacques Mignon's comment, October 4, 2013 3:28 AM
See also : http://www.google.be/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CEAQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.tno.nl%2Fdownloads%2FTNO-poster%2520mealworm-risk%2520allergenicity-2013.pdf&ei=b2xOUu-1BYHJ0AWr8oDYBQ&usg=AFQjCNGLJiSwzjplLKR8UO8yaGmNsFPqOQ&sig2=ov3cAmDkrF8o1mFUg76Cag&bvm=bv.53537100,d.d2k
Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Is FAO turning its back on Edible Insects?: FAO’s Senior Forestry Officer Paul Vantomme retires! - 4ento

Is FAO turning its back on Edible Insects?: FAO’s Senior Forestry Officer Paul Vantomme retires! - 4ento | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Who doesn´t know Paul? The man behind Edible Insects to whom we look for advise and support! A personality in his own right, who has managed to create an amalgam between industry and academia, always making sure the sector will get to move forward. Well, after 25 years of FAO service, our guiding star takes his well-deserved retirement February 1st and I want to invite you to take two minutes to let him know how much his support and knowledge meant to you and your business or project over these years !! Thanks Paul for your #edibleinsect knowledge and support[...]
Ana C. Day's insight:

WHO IS GOING TO REPLACE Mr. Vantomme? Who will be our Ento-Godfather, our glue?

It is my understanding that, so far, nobody has been nominated by his director, Eva Muller (eva.muller@fao.org), to replace him. Is his post at FAO being abolished? In any case, who will look out for the maintenance of any of his previous activities now that he is gone? What about further updates on the webpage Directory, legal studies, networking, projects, meetings and so on?? And it gets worse…! The word INSECTS does not even appear in the official FAO workplans for the years 2016/17 !

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Raymond WM Fung's curator insight, April 3, 12:02 AM

WHO IS GOING TO REPLACE Mr. Vantomme? Who will be our Ento-Godfather, our glue?

It is my understanding that, so far, nobody has been nominated by his director, Eva Muller (eva.muller@fao.org), to replace him. Is his post at FAO being abolished? In any case, who will look out for the maintenance of any of his previous activities now that he is gone? What about further updates on the webpage Directory, legal studies, networking, projects, meetings and so on?? And it gets worse…! The word INSECTS does not even appear in the official FAO workplans for the years 2016/17 !

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Edible Insects Market - Global Industry Size, Trends, Analysis, and Forecast 2016 - 2024.

Edible Insects Market - Global Industry Size, Trends, Analysis, and Forecast 2016 - 2024. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Albany, NY -- (SBWIRE) -- 05/17/2016 -- Insect are often considered as pest for animals and crops. However they are fundamental part of nature and are a source of food at low cost. Insects are not merely famine food eaten at times of scarcity or situation when harvesting of conventional food becomes difficult. Edible insect as food and feed has emerged as agile issue due to rising cost of animal protein, food and feed insecurity, growing population and rising demand for protein among the middle class. The consumption of insects or entomophagy contributes to positive health and livelihood.

The edible insect market can be segmented by type as- Mealworm, Grasshoppers, Locusts, Caterpillar, Termites, Beetles and Others. Moreover it can also be segmented by application type such as- Human food, Animal feed (Poultry and Aquaculture) and Others. Geographically the market can be segmented as- North America, APAC, Europe and Rest of the World (RoW) regions.
Ana C. Day's insight:

Download Free exclusive Sample of this report: http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/sample/sample.php?flag=B&rep_id=10892

"Palatability of insect and presence of edible insects in local food culture are the driving forces which are shaping the global edible insects market. Moreover insects are rich source of protein and are low cost substitute for animal proteins. Lack of legal framework governing the insect consumption and deficit of networking and distribution channel among producers are the restraining factors hindering the growth of edible insects market. Moreover consumer awareness and negative perception about insect consumption is another growth barrier.

Asia- Pacific region has shown growth in edible insects sector. Countries such as China, Bangladesh, India, Malaysia and Sri Lanka contribute to this growth along with Africa (Rest of the World (RoW)). The global edible insect market is expected to grow over next six years with a significant growth rate."

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Edible worms, pingpong bots: Startups find mecca in Shenzhen

Edible worms, pingpong bots: Startups find mecca in Shenzhen | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
SHENZHEN, China (AP) — Shenzhen is the world's electronics manufacturing capital, so what better place to be for entrepreneurs with ideas they want to turn into actual devices?
Ana C. Day's insight:

BUGGED

"Grow your own insects at home with a desktop hive, and then eat them. Livin Farms' Austrian founder Katharina Unger says mealworms are a healthy, sustainable alternative to modern, industrialized food production, delicious roasted and salted, as a minced meat substitute or ground into flour for bread or tortillas. The company topped its $100,000 crowdfunding goal by half after a Hax session last autumn. Unger says being based in Shenzhen enables the company to ensure its factory subcontractor treats staff well and manufactures sustainably."

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London Future Food Festival: Cocktail confectionary, VR pints & a robot vodka luge

London Future Food Festival: Cocktail confectionary, VR pints & a robot vodka luge | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
London Future Food Festival: A free foodie festival is coming to London to showcase where taste and technology meet.
Ana C. Day's insight:
Chipper creepy crawly snacks

"We’ve already been told by futurologist Dr Morgaine Gaye that counter-top insect farms will be a staple in our future kitchens.

So perhaps it’s unsurprising that guests attending this weekend’s Future of Food Festival will get to chomp down on some creepy crawly goodies, courtesy of Chipper."

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‘Helping consumers to catch the edible insects bug’

‘Helping consumers to catch the edible insects bug’ | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
While edible insects and insect-based products have seen an unprecedented surge in popular media coverage over the last few years, it’s mind-blowing to think that for all intents and purposes, this industry is less than a decade old. Maybe it seems strange or disgusting to you that somebody would eat insects, but that’s okay! Most people raised in a culture where insects are treated like pests instead of dinner have a hard time getting past the mental hurdle. I had a tough go of it myself when I had my first cricket four years ago, but I now know that the only reason I was squeamish was because of the social norms I was raised with. “Crawfish and shrimp? Sign me up!” “Bugs…that’s gross”. Funny that an insect that looks so similar to shellfish is met with such an obstinate response.

Why should we even consider eating something that our food culture deems appalling, gross or disgusting? I became interested in this untapped resource in 2012. That year, the United Nations predicted by 2050 we would have 9 billion people on the planet (that’s around 2 billion more people than the global population in 2012). By 2015 that projection had risen to 9.7 billion people by 2050. The numbers are daunting, especially when considering how overstretched and exploited our fisheries and arable land already are today, but it is interesting to note that areas like Latin America (Mexico and Brazil), Central and Southeast Asia (India, China, Indonesia) and Africa (28 countries including the fastest growing population, Nigeria) are expected to contribute the majority of this population growth.
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Want to turn pasta into a superfood? Just add crickets.

Want to turn pasta into a superfood? Just add crickets. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
But things are changing.  Over the past few years, interest in insect-based food has significantly increased, and companies trying to bring these products to the market have been popping up in Europe and the US.  Unfortunately, in Europe, the lack of legislation covering insects as food has prevented the import and sale of many commercial insect-based products.  Most countries in the EU still do not allow these types of products to be imported and sold. 
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Exo Wants Us to Crave Crickets, One Protein Bar at a Time

Exo Wants Us to Crave Crickets, One Protein Bar at a Time | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Exo wants you to eat crickets. Co-founders Gabi Lewis and Greg Sewitz ordered thousands of crickets to their dorm room at Brown and it wasn’t for a senior prank. While still at school, they tinkered with different uses of cricket protein and they landed on simple, flavorful fruit and nut packed bars that leave you guessing, “Are you sure there was a cricket in there?”

Exo is set to join our sister pub Edible Manhattan next month at Food Loves Tech: a first-of-its kind city scale expo showcasing the technologies shaping the future of food. Interest piqued? Join us June 10-12.
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Bugs: A strange case of amnesia

Bugs: A strange case of amnesia | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Add insects to familiar food products like cookies, pasta and chips, and you get a "disgust inhibitor”: this is the way to go, since the concept of edible insects makes total sense, though people rarely discuss this rationally. 

North America and Europe abandoned insects as food a long time ago, for reasons that do not exist anymore. For example, in the past, insects were associated with pests that destroyed crops. Think “Vegetable destroyers!” If this were a movie, the bugs would play the role of the bad guy for sure. 
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What’s the future of meat? (Infographic)

What’s the future of meat? (Infographic) | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
It’s getting harder to produce the volume of meat people want to consume, and the trend seems to be getting worse. So what can be done about it?

The planet can handle an awful lot of stress, yet sometimes an awful lot just won’t satisfy us. Too much industry puts pressure on the ice caps. Too much fishing leaves too little in reserve.
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Victoria restaurants putting bugs on the menu

Victoria restaurants putting bugs on the menu | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Crickets, cricket flour, and meal worms: it’s what’s for dinner!

At least, that’s the case at six Victoria restaurants this weekend. They’ve decided to help promote the release of a new documentary titled “Bugs on the Menu”.

“The ‘ick’ factor is the big one”, admits Ian Toews, the film’s director.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Nonetheless, the documentary aims to normalize the consumption of insects. Already a common practice outside North America, it not only offers a potential solution to food security issues, but also a healthy one.

“A lot of research now is proving that insects, particularly crickets and grasshoppers, are essentially sort of a superfood,” says Toews."

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The future of food: Will we all be eating insects and algae soon?

The future of food: Will we all be eating insects and algae soon? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The world’s food system might be at risk, experts claim in alarming reports that with a world population expected to reach at least 9 billion people by 205
Ana C. Day's insight:
Micronutris

"Based in Toulouse and founded in 2011, Micronutris is known as the first French farm to raise edible mealworms and crickets, a particularly good alternative source of protein. The concept of eating insects, or entomophagy, is already used in some Asian and South-American countries such as Thailand or Brazil. Moreover, Micronutris doesn’t just produce insects, they also craft fine products with them, such as pasta or chocolate, which they sell on their website. They’re also the first operational European farm in this segment, and the first one in the world with ISO 22000 certification, thanks to their expertise."

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Have the stomach for a bug soup or pasta for lunch? - Pulse by Maeil Business News Korea

Have the stomach for a bug soup or pasta for lunch? - Pulse by Maeil Business News Korea | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The soup will hit shop shelves toward the end of the year, said Woo Sang-hwan, Jeong Poong sales and marketing chief. And the taste? Woo claims it is actually tastier than typical soup made out of standard powder.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The company is already onto the next menu - pasta sauce using mealworm oil that can augment the flavor of olive oil-garlic Aglio e Olio pasta recipe. Insects are rich in protein as 100 grams of mealworm contains about 50 grams of protein, more than doubling 21 grams of protein contained in a beef slice of the same weight. The company plans to introduce ready-made food for patients using edible insects."

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Detroit Ento to host five-course dinner featuring edible insects

Detroit Ento to host five-course dinner featuring edible insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Detroit Ento, a sustainable protein R&D firm that focuses on locally reared insects, is offering a truly unique dining experience on May 26. 

Hosted by Salt and Cedar in Eastern Market, Detroit Ento describes the meal as "Detroit's first edible insect culinary event." The five-course dinner will consist of locally-farmed insects such as crickets and mealworms, "as well as other notable and unique species," according to the event notice.
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Entomoveproject, this is the end…

Entomoveproject, this is the end… | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Yes, you read well the title… This is the last post of my blog Entomoveproject. After 18 months, 100 articles in French and English, a lot of insects cooked, a large variety of products, some TV show and so many great people met: This is the end of Entomoveproject. Don’t be sad, it’s only the beginning of the real stuff!
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Has Food Tech Lost Its Flavor? Investors Dial Back On Funding Food-Focused Startups

Has Food Tech Lost Its Flavor? Investors Dial Back On Funding Food-Focused Startups | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Next-generation food development (like Soylent, Exo, Hampton Creek Foods, or Impossible Foods)
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Marseille : les insectes, on en fait tout un plat

Marseille : les insectes, on en fait tout un plat | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Contenu Soustitre: Chenilles, punaises, termites sont au menu du premier resto entomophage de Marseille, qui grouille de clients Résumé: Chenilles
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Contenu Soustitre: Chenilles, punaises, termites sont au menu du premier resto entomophage de Marseille, qui grouille de clients Résumé: Chenilles, punaises, termites sont au menu du premier resto entomophage de Marseille, qui grouille de clients Distinction: N/A Signature: Sophie Manelli On va prendre un verre, ce soir ? Plutôt un ver alors. Accompagné d'une assiette de chenilles, d'une poêlée de grillons, d'un assortiment de termites. Et en dessert, on commandera quelques scarabées grillés bien croustillants. Miam ! Eh oui : à Marseille aussi, voici venu venir le temps de l'entomoph..."

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We Tried Cricket Chocolate Chip Cookies So You Don’t Have To

We Tried Cricket Chocolate Chip Cookies So You Don’t Have To | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
CRICKET cookies. Yes, you read that right. Entomophagy is by no means a new practice to those of other countries, but the eating of insects is quickly gaining momentum in the Western world. They say it’s the future of low-fat, high-protein cooking. Plus, you eat the whole thing. Sustainable much?

Get this: Just 100 grams of cricket contains a whopping 12.9 grams of protein. Ounce for ounce, you get nearly twice the protein of beef. They’re also a complete protein, which means they contain all nine of the essential amino acids. It’s hard to argue with stats like that.

Still not convinced? We figured. We know these critter cookies aren’t for the faint of heart, so that’s why we gave them a try for you.
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You can snack on bugs this weekend at the Natural History Museum. But do you want to?

You can snack on bugs this weekend at the Natural History Museum. But do you want to? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
During Master Chef: Bug Edition, insects will be fried, scrambled and seared by David George Gordon and Zach Lemann, who are noted entomophagists (those who practice the consumption of insects as food—yeah, we had to look that one up). The chef's dishes will be judged by Alie Ward, a host of Tripping Out with Alie & Georgia on the Cooking Channel, along with entomologist Phil Torres. And yes, you'll be able to try Gordon and Lemann's snacks yourself. Who's in??

The bug cook-off will be held at the Otis Booth Pavilion G at 11am on both Saturday and Sunday. Admission to the Bug Fair is $12 for adults, $9 for seniors and students, and $5 for children (3-12); museum members and children under 2 are free. Tickets can be purchased here, but admission to Master Chef: Bug Edition is on a first-come, first-serve basis. One thing we don't know: are the bugs gluten-free? 
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You can soon eat mealworm pasta sauce in Toronto

You can soon eat mealworm pasta sauce in Toronto | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Toronto has gone cuckoo for crickets and other edible insects. The latest buzz-worthy product to fuel the craze comes from One Hop Kitchen in the form of bolognese sauce. The kicker, of course, is that this particular red sauce is made from mealworms. Well, that and crickets, if that's more up your alley.

Why the rage about bug-based foods? According to the company, the key is sustainability. One Hop claims that one jar of its bolognese saves 1500 litres of water compared to one made with beef. Alternative proteins, as they are sometimes referred to, are gaining in popularity, but still face significant stigma.

Toward that end, Toronto's Bevlab is hosting an upcoming workshop on the future of food and the place of insects as ingredients. One Hop's cricket bolognese will be one of a number of products on offer for attendees to try.
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Niki Bezzant: Wormicelli, anyone? - Lifestyle - NZ Herald News

Niki Bezzant: Wormicelli, anyone? - Lifestyle - NZ Herald News | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
How do you feel about eating bugs? Fancy cricket pasta in a tasty sauce - a bit of "buglonaise"?

Or how about crunchy barbecue-flavoured mealworms with that after-work drink?

As far-fetched as that sounds, insects could easily be part of our food future. In fact, it's happening now.

In the past month I have tried two edible insect products: cricket pasta and cricket flour. Crickets seem to be the "gateway bug" - an accessible route to the more challenging worms and grubs. Crickets are easy to farm, apparently, and they have potential as a protein source of the future.
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Mealworm Soup as an Appetizer?

Mealworm Soup as an Appetizer? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
SEOUL, May 12 (Korea Bizwire) – Although the idea seems disturbing to many, insects have long been part of human cuisine. So here is the latest update to Korean entomophagy: an insect-based soup will be launched, possibly by the year’s end.

JeongPoong, a Korean food enterprise, revealed that it came up with a new recipe for a mealworm soup. The company added protein concentrate extracted from mealworms to its existing recipe. The soup’s richness in protein makes it the perfect dish for children, seniors, and hospital patients. 
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3D food printing vending machines and customisable snacks

3D food printing vending machines and customisable snacks | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
3D food printing has the potential to revolutionise food production, according to a symposium at IFT15: Where Science Feeds Innovation.
Ana C. Day's insight:
Materials and ingredients

A"daptation of ingredients and recipes may also hold the key to the sustainable aspects of 3D food printing. Algae protein or insects could be used as an alternative to animal meat when it comes to 3D printed food. In an article in Popular Mechanics, Kjeld van Bommel, a researcher at the Dutch Organisation for Applied Scientific Research, described an experiment where his research group included mealworm in a shortbread 3D cookie recipe. He said: “The look [of the worms] put me off, but in the shape of a cookie I’ll eat it. You eat with your eyes”. He added: “I’d rather that instead of printing a steak from cow protein, you could make it from algae or insects.”

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Edible insects

Edible insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
NB Studio asks whether introducing bugs into mainstream eating could save the world
We’re heading towards a nutrition crisis. By 2050, we’ll have 9 billion mouths to feed. The livestock industry can’t cope. It’s swallowing up land and water, and farting out more greenhouse gases than all the planes, trains and automobiles combined. The answer is simple: eat more insects. It’s 20 times more efficient to farm cicadas than cows – and they taste of asparagus.
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Edible Insects, a West Village Block Party, and More Intel

Edible Insects, a West Village Block Party, and More Intel | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
EVENTWIRE — Wayne State University will host the nation's first-ever conference on edible insects May 26 through May 28 at the campus' Community Arts Auditorium. Multi-day event will feature speakers, vendors, and educational programming, as well as five-course meal at Salt & Cedar in Eastern Market featuring "a range of edible insects" with drink pairings. [EaterWire]
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Daesang to introduce ‘mealworm soups’

Daesang to introduce ‘mealworm soups’ | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Despite most people feeling uneasy about eating insects, one particular insect is scheduled to soon debut as a part of a protein-rich meal in South Korea.

Jeong Poong, an affiliate of the Korean general foods company Daesang Group, on Thursday said that it will introduce a series of readymade soups made with protein from mealworms this year
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The new soups are infused with high-concentrate protein extracted from mealworms, the larval form of the darkling beetle. Mealworms are widely considered nutritious insects that contain high levels of protein and low calories.

“We selected mealworms over other insects, given their superior protein levels and taste, not to mention the positive visual effect when mixed into the soup,” Woo Sang-hwan, general manager of sales at Jeong Poong told The Korea Herald."

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‘Insect sauces’ of locust, silkworm and grasshopper are surprise hits:The Asahi Shimbun

‘Insect sauces’ of locust, silkworm and grasshopper are surprise hits:The Asahi Shimbun | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
KINOKAWA, Wakayama Prefecture--Locusts, grasshoppers and silkworms may not usually be associated with Japanese food, but their new role in fermented sauces could become an unlikely pairing.

The unconventional condiments made an impression at a recent tasting event here attended by 11 people from in and outside the western prefecture of Wakayama.
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