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A Taste Of The Future Of Food

Transcript CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST: Unless you've been hiding under a burger bun for the past week, you've probably heard the story about the lab
Ana C. Day's insight:

"

HEADLEE: One of the other things that's just coming up recently is the idea of insects as food. And, in fact, you can actually do searches on the Internet and find restaurants that feature either ground-up insects or insects whole.

(LAUGHTER)

HEADLEE: Could we be seeing more and more insects creeping into our food?

GAYE: It's already quite popular in a few European countries, especially the Netherlands where they're, year on year, growing and selling many more insects. But also, there are countries like Australia where they've decided to call locusts flying prawns or flying shrimp, and they found that people eat them much more readily if they have a different name. But also, ground-up grasshoppers ground into bars such as muesli bars with fruits and nuts, using a cricket flower. People actually don't know it's insects at all.

So, I think when we grind them up and we make insect patties - mixed with vegetables and onions - people don't really know any different.

HEADLEE: Have you eaten them?

GAYE: I have eaten them. Actually pretty good and they all taste quite differently; some are quite cheesy, others are a bit like lemon, and some are sort of nutty. And I think that's it really is just about the way we're socialized around animals and insects where we think, ew, creepy crawlies or bugs or they're dirty. But the way in which they're bred is actually incredibly hygienic. They love to be bred in captivity in small spaces."

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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Current State of Legislation For Insects As Food - 4ento

Current State of Legislation For Insects As Food - 4ento | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Is selling Insects as Food legal? Find out what the current state of legislation is for edible insects and what the future holds for this rising trend.
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Watch a Documentary That Will Change Your Views on the Future of Food

Watch a Documentary That Will Change Your Views on the Future of Food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

In 'America's Shrinking Farms,' Charlet Duboc travels across the US to see how innovators are working towards a healthier, more secure global food supply. If we don't change the way we eat and farm, we're looking at the potential devastation of our planet. In search of alternatives, we traveled across the US to meet with the innovative pioneers working to change that shit for the better. Find out what we might be eating in 20 years--and the unlikely places our food

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Trend watch: buggin' out?

Trend watch: buggin' out? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Imagine sitting down to eat in a restaurant and being served a plate of locusts...
Whilst this may sound like the stuff of nightmares to some, insects are being touted as an up and coming, healthy option and beginning to feature on menus across the country.

But the practice of eating bugs, otherwise known as entomophagy, has been around for a long time.

In fact, insects have been considered a nutritious delicacy in certain parts of the world including China, Vietnam, Mexico, Columbia, New Guinea and several parts of Africa for thousands of years.

Perhaps westerners are just habitually squeamish when it comes to trying new things? After all, the benefits of eating bugs are highly convincing. Firstly, insects are full of protein and contain a fraction of the fat found in a standard cut of meat.
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Shailene Woodley Eats Bugs, Thinks the "Future of Food Is in Insects"

Shailene Woodley Eats Bugs, Thinks the "Future of Food Is in Insects" | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Shailene Woodley revealed that she's eaten bugs and specified which types of insects she's consumed -- find out whether she liked the experience 

"I’ve eaten ants and that was great," the New Age-y star noted. "And June bugs, that was great. I think the future of food is in insects, so we’ll see what happens."

Luckily, she's not an insect herself — although she said she wouldn't mind flying. "If I could," Woodley mused, "I would grow a pair of wings and fly."


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▶ Next Millennium Farms - Insect Farming, Cricket Farming making Insect Protein and Cricket Flour - YouTube

https://youtu.be/NvEJxnpC7Uw
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How about some Guam Beetlemania

How about some Guam Beetlemania | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

I can already see the signs in my head: 'Roasted Rhino Beetles! $3 each! Such could be the case if Guam ever got a taste for entomophagy, the practice of eating insects.'

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Infographic: Is Insect Farming the New Ag Frontier? - Hobby Farms

Infographic: Is Insect Farming the New Ag Frontier? - Hobby Farms | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Since the 4th century B.C.—and perhaps even earlier—people have relied on insects as a dietary protein source. With no Piggly Wiggly down the street, early Greeks and Romans turned to cicadas, locusts and grasshoppers for dinner. Today, many Asian, African, and Central and South American cultures still feature insects on their menus. More Western culinarians are even turning their attention to edible insects, as well, as both a foodie trend and a more sustainable protein source for a growing world population.

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Cricket flour is high in protein - Victoria Advocate

Cricket flour is high in protein - Victoria Advocate | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

I recently came across cricket flour, touted as a high protein flour, and I was wondering if you are familiar with this and if you could share your insight into this product. Also, are crickets kosher and would you suggest purchasing organic cricket flour?

Did you know the consumption of insects as food is known as entomophagy? 

Now, a bit of cricket history: Crickets have long been the symbol of good luck in many cultures, including the Chinese culture.

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Why Meat Free Week won't work

Why Meat Free Week won't work | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
It’s hard to fault the idealism of Meat Free Week – but a die-hard meat eater is a hard nut to crack. Better to drop the ethical propaganda and big up the positives of vegetables as a sexy, modern alternative
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Upmarket bug snacks creeping into stores

Upmarket bug snacks creeping into stores | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Street vendors selling deep-fried insects as snacks are a familiar sight in Bangkok, but a Thai entrepreneur is trying to give edible bugs a more upmarket appeal.
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‘Edible aquatic insects of Loktak lake are at the verge of extinction’ - Imphal Times - A Daily Eveninger

‘Edible aquatic insects of Loktak lake are at the verge of extinction’ - Imphal Times - A Daily Eveninger | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

By: WAHENGBAM RORRKYCHANDSince immemorial the people of Manipur considered some of the insects as consumable. For these people of Manipur edible aquatic insects is considered as the cheapest sources of animal protein. However, due to the degrading biodiversity of Loktak lake which produce around 60 percent of these insects, some of the species are already extinct and some are at the verge of extinction.
The most productive ecosystem, Loktak lake is home to more than 230 species of macrophytes, 425 species of animal ansd thousand of avifaunal species.

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Cricket Protein Bars - eXo Cricket Flour Protein - YouTube

http://healthyinsect.com for Cricket Protein Bars. It is also your source for information on Insect protein, insect flour, cricket protein, and cricket flour...
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Shailene Woodley, a Doctor and an Entrepreneur All Have This Gross Thing in Common

Shailene Woodley, a Doctor and an Entrepreneur All Have This Gross Thing in Common | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Shailene Woodley believes in bugs. Or rather, she believes that we should be eating them. The 23-year-old star of “Divergent” recently confessed to Nylon:

“The strangest thing I’ve ever eaten … I’ve eaten ants and that was great, uh, and june bugs that was great. I think the future of food is in insects, so we’ll see what happens.”
Woodley makes a bold claim since I always thought the food of the future would be Gogurt or maybe protein-packed Pop-Tarts. Never would I have predicted a backward return to bugs.
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Weak Oversight Is Holding Back Edible Insects

Weak Oversight Is Holding Back Edible Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Industry leaders say they can’t ramp up their cricket powder sales because of vague regulations. A Florida native, Dr. Aaron T. Dossey is one of the main suppliers fueling a burgeoning insect boom. That powder, his latest product, was made for Exo, an insect protein bar company. His company, All Things Bugs, has also supplied cricket protein bar company Chapul, as well as Six Foods’s cricket chips.

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Edible insects challenge

Mise en place d'une application fonctionnant de paire avec un bracelet pour répondre à la problématique : comment faire de l'entomophage un nouveau modèle alimentaire ?
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That’s Not Gross—That’s Sustainable Protein

That’s Not Gross—That’s Sustainable Protein | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Don’t say “eww” just yet. Keep your eyes—and mind—open as Jonas Pedersen and Josh Evans of Nordic Food Lab dabble in what many would see as the dregs of the food chain but some view as the future of sustainable dining.

From bugs to guts, nothing here is too taboo for the table. It’s just a matter of preparation, balancing flavors and textures, and pursuing creative visions of what’s possible.


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Crickets could be coming soon to the University of Winnipeg cafeteria

Crickets could be coming soon to the University of Winnipeg cafeteria | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Ben Kramer, executive chef of Diversity Food Services Inc., says the insects are tasty.

The introduction of crickets falls in line with the company’s drive for sustainability, environmental awareness and focus on using local suppliers, Mr. Kramer said.

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Edible Insects: The Next Protein Trend? | Vitacost.com Blog

Edible Insects: The Next Protein Trend? | Vitacost.com Blog | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Are you grossed out by the thought of chomping on crawly critters like caterpillars and crickets? Probably, but it turns out they’re a terrific source of
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Could squirmy livestock dent Africa’s protein deficit? - Nelson Institute | News

Could squirmy livestock dent Africa’s protein deficit? - Nelson Institute | News | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
As a cheap and easy source of protein for humans, it might be hard to beat the mighty mealworm. Graduate students Rachel Bergmans and Valerie Stull are researching the use of mealworms as an inexpensive microlivestock.
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Are insects the next big green food?

Are insects the next big green food? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Author of iDisrupted predicts that super scaleable, high protein insects could be a major contributor to the world food supply.

London, UK (March 25, 2015) iDisrupted - Are insects the meat of the future? John Straw, co-author of the new book iDisrupted thinks so, and here he explains why…

According to the United Nations, livestock uses around 30% of the world’s ice-free land mass and produces 14.5% of all greenhouse-gas emissions. Making meat also requires supplying animals with vast amounts of water and food. For example, in the United States producing 1kg of live animal weight typically requires 10kg of feed for beef, 5kg for pork and 2.5kg for poultry. Insects on the otherhand are much easier to raise; they produce less waste and the world has a huge supply.

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Even Neil DeGrasse Tyson Is Now Munching On Bugs

Even Neil DeGrasse Tyson Is Now Munching On Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

At an event to honor the modern-day science hero, $15,000 worth of edible insects were on the menu. So Tyson was willing — if not exactly eager — to explore the delicacies on offer. For science. Guest of honor Neil deGrasse Tyson, in a formal vest with gold celestial shapes, picked up a Cambodian cricket rumaki canape, looking at it skeptically before taking a bite.

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Insects As Food? - YouTube

Insect-based edibles, such as cricket flour and energy bars, are already abuzz in the U.S. food industry. Daniella Martin, author of a book on the subject, s...
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A bug's life: Protein bar made out of crickets launches crowdfunding campaign

A bug's life: Protein bar made out of crickets launches crowdfunding campaign | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A Kickstarter campaign aims to fund a health-conscious protein bar made out of cricket powder.
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Des insectes à goûter à Paul Sabatier

Des insectes à goûter à Paul Sabatier | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Ce mercredi à 17 heures à l'Université Paul Sabatier de Toulouse se tiendra une conférence sur l'entomophagie, autrement dit la pratique qui consiste à manger des insectes. Une dégustation sera proposée à la fin de l'intervention. «Ce n'est pas ...
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